All-22: Analyzing Foles' poor decisions vs. Dallas

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All-22: Analyzing Foles' poor decisions vs. Dallas

To say Nick Foles made some bad throws against Dallas would be an understatement.

Nobody needs a film study to know that Foles frequently overthrew receivers when he wasn’t throwing behind them, that he missed a wide-open Brent Celek for a big gain on the left side, that his bomb to DeSean Jackson in the end zone lacked great placement and that his easy touchdown to Jason Avant somehow wasn’t so easy.

But the All-22 tape also shows that Foles lacked good field vision against the Cowboys, often forcing passes into coverage when other receivers were open. One of his strengths up until Sunday had been making his progressions and using his entire set of weapons, spreading the ball and finding checkdowns against the pass rush.

For whatever reason, those strengths eluded him Sunday, and the problems started early.

On the Eagles’ first possession, Foles faced 3rd-and-10 at his own 29-yard line. The Eagles came out in a three-wide, one-back formation designed to isolate running back LeSean McCoy on Cowboys linebacker Bruce Carter down the left sideline. The Chargers had success with wheel routes against Dallas, so the Eagles were copycatting the idea.

McCoy lines up next to Foles in the shotgun but releases down the left sideline, while slot wideout Avant runs an inside route to draw the coverage:



The play goes according to plan. Avant’s inside route frees up McCoy around the left side without a defender within five yards. A good lead pass by Foles to the outside shoulder could even be a touchdown, if McCoy can shake the deep safety. Foles even looks toward the left side:



For whatever reason, though, Foles decides to throw across the middle to Zach Ertz, and his pass is so high that it bounces off the tight end’s outstretched hand. You can see McCoy is behind every defensive back except the deep safety, who’s about 12 yards away:



In the second quarter, on 3rd-and-7 at the Eagles’ 29, Foles has a chance to capitalize on a Tampa-2 look by the Cowboys designed to ensure that they’re not beaten by Jackson or Riley Cooper for the first down. Avant will run an inside route that takes the nickelback and linebackers toward the middle:



The deep routes by Jackson and Cooper and crossing route by Avant force Dallas’ defense to give up the underneath. With just a four-man rush, Foles steps up in the pocket and surveys the field. He has McCoy and Celek open around the 30. Each has enough space to get the first down if Foles can get the ball out quickly. Avant is double-covered across the middle, a danger zone for the QB:



For whatever reason, Foles ignores his checkdowns and attempts that dangerous pass across the middle. Avant dives, but can’t make the catch:



Later in the second, on 1st-and-10, Foles again misses his checkdowns, this time with pressure coming at him.

The Cowboys again play their safeties deep with man coverage against the Eagles’ three wideouts. Jackson is lined up split right, with Cooper on the left side and Avant in the left slot. All three run deep routes, taking the coverage with them and leaving the underneath for Celek and McCoy:



As he steps up to avoid pressure from the front four, Foles has McCoy a few yards in front and Celek nearing the 40, with space to get more yards. He even has a shot at deep right, with Jackson getting an inside step and both safeties shading toward the opposite side of the field:



But instead of three options, Foles holds onto the ball and gets trampled for a six-yard sack:



On a 3rd-and-4 at his own 22 in the third, Foles again has several options, but tries to force a pass instead of making the smarter decision.

This time, the Eagles have all three wide receivers to the left side and Dallas crowds the box with seven, playing just one safety deep. The defensive look gives Foles room to make a play downfield if he can get the ball out in time. Cooper runs a dig at the 30, while Avant and Jackson each run about five yards and cut in opposite directions:



Cooper beats his man to the inside at the 30 and McCoy releases to the right flat, where he’s open at the 20. Jackson’s runs a quick-in at the 25, in front of two linebackers -- again, a danger zone:



Instead of going to Cooper or McCoy, Foles tries to force the ball into Jackson across the middle, where Cowboys linebacker Sean Lee (50) awaits. Foles’ pass is late and too far ahead of Jackson. Lee converges in time to break up the pass. It easily could have been a pick-six for the former Penn State star:

Now with Big3, Rashard Lewis praises Sixers' signing of former teammate JJ Redick

Now with Big3, Rashard Lewis praises Sixers' signing of former teammate JJ Redick

How time flies.

JJ Redick first played with Rashard Lewis on the Magic in 2007, Redick’s second season in the NBA. Ten years later, the 33-year-old Redick has signed a massive one-year, $23 million contract to be one of the Sixers’ leaders. Lewis, 37, is currently competing in the BIG3 league. 

Both Redick and Lewis are in different places in their careers than when they were teammates. Lewis sees Redick excelling in this new chapter. 

“He’s the veteran player here, but when I played with him in Orlando he was a young fella,” Lewis said. “He’s learned a lot playing with Orlando as well as the Clippers. I’m sure he’ll share a lot of his knowledge with these guys because they’ve got a very young team.”

Redick’s NBA insight came from doing a lot of observing early on. He didn’t start off as a main offensive option. Instead, he was a student of the game in his early days with the Magic while Lewis was one of the go-to players. 

Redick only averaged 6.0 points as a rookie and 4.1 points in 8.1 minutes per game during his second season. He clocked a total of 10 minutes during a 2008 postseason in which the Magic reached the Eastern Conference Semifinals. The following season in 2009, though, Redick averaged over 20 minutes per game in their NBA Finals run. The Magic also made it to the Eastern Conference Finals the next year.

“The chemistry we had was great,” Lewis said. “I think he’s going to bring that here to Philly.”

Over time, Redick developed into one of the best long-range threats in the league. He holds a 41.5 percent career three-point shooting percentage, sixth among all active players. The Sixers have been in need of go-to scorers, especially from beyond the arc. 

“He’s going to help this team,” Lewis said. “He’s going to open it up because he’s a shooter.”

The Sixers are entering an important phase this coming season. They finally have a foundation in place and a core to build upon for years down the road, not just the time being. The younger players will benefit from listening to Redick during practices, games, team flights, and all the other scenarios in which they can soak up his experiences. That could include the playoffs, too, in the suddenly wide-open Eastern Conference. 

“The way he played the game, he’s not only a good shooter but he’s a smart player,” Lewis said. “He has a high basketball IQ. That’s why he’s still playing in the league. A lot of teams have a lot of respect for him.”

Jordan Spieth avoids another major meltdown to win British Open

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Jordan Spieth avoids another major meltdown to win British Open

SOUTHPORT, England -- Jordan Spieth is the British Open champion, just like expected, though not like anyone could have imagined.

On the verge of another meltdown in a major, so wild off the tee that he played one shot from the driving range at Royal Birkdale and lost the lead for the first time all weekend, Spieth bounced back with a collection of clutch shots, delivering a rally that ranks among the best.

A near ace. A 50-foot eagle putt. A 30-foot birdie putt.

Spieth played the final five holes in 5 under and closed with a 1-under 69 for a three-shot victory over Matt Kuchar, giving him the third leg of the career Grand Slam and a chance to be the youngest to win them all next month at the PGA Championship.

Spieth joined Jack Nicklaus as the only players to win three different majors at age 23, and even the Golden Bear was impressed.

"Is Jordan Spieth something else?" Nicklaus tweeted during a wild back nine.

Spieth missed four putts inside 8 feet on the front nine and lost his three-shot lead. Then, he looked certain to lose the British Open -- and the reputation he craves as a reliable closer -- when his tee shot on the par-4 13th was some 75 yards right of the fairway, buried in grass on a dune so steep he could barely stand up.

He took a penalty shot for an unplayable lie, and when he realized the practice range was in play, headed back on a line so far that he was behind the equipment trucks. He still had a blind shot with a 3-iron over the dunes to a fairway littered with pot bunkers, stopping just short of one of them near the green.

Kuchar, who had to wait 20 minutes for Spieth to get his situation sorted, missed his 15-foot birdie putt. Spieth pitched over the bunker to 7 feet and made the putt to escape with bogey, falling behind for the first time.

And that's when the show began.

Spieth hit a 6-iron that plopped down in front of the pin at the par-3 14th and came within inches of a hole-in-one. He rolled in a 4-foot birdie putt and tied Kuchar. Given new life, he holed a 50-foot eagle putt and turned to caddie Michael Greller and said, "Go get that!"

Emotions rolling, Spieth followed with a 30-foot birdie at the 16th and was ahead by two. And after Kuchar holed a 20-foot birdie putt on the par-5 17th, Spieth assured himself a two-shot margin up the final hole by pouring in yet another birdie.

From the driving range to the claret jug, Spieth put himself in hallowed territory just days before his 24th birthday. Nicklaus was about six months younger than Spieth when he won the 1963 PGA Championship for the third leg of the Grand Slam.

Spieth goes to Quail Hollow in North Carolina next month with a chance to get that final portion of the Grand Slam.

Kuchar closed with a 69 and did nothing wrong. He just had no answers for Spieth's final blitz. Kuchar had a one-shot lead leaving the 13th green. He played the next four holes with two pars and two birdies and was two shots behind.

Li Haotong of China shot a 63 and finished third.