AT&T National: Adam Scott Cards 66, Military Parks Tank on Course

AT&T National: Adam Scott Cards 66, Military Parks Tank on Course

We're officially off and running at the AT&T National. Two men, Adam Scott and Hunter Haas, are tied for the 18-hole lead at 4-under-par, while a whole host of others are in contention and in red numbers. Unfortunately for those pulling for local favorites Sean O'Hair and Jim Furyk, neither man would find himself on the low-side of par after day one. The two currently reside at a combined thirteen-over-par.

Comments from co-leader Adam Scott and our picks for the best spots to camp out on the course after the jump...
Though Aussie Adam Scott may not have the local ties or, let's say, a membership at Aronimink (I'm looking at you, O'Hair), he is nonetheless familiar with the golf course. After draining a fifteen-footer for birdie on 18, Scott made his way to the media tent to discuss his own relationship with 83-year-old Donald Ross design. A participant in the 1997 U.S. Junior Amateur, an event also held on the grounds of Aronimink, Scott fondly recalled his experience as a seventeen-year-old in unfamiliar territory.

"I didn't know much at all about the style of golf courses in the Northeast of America back then. So, coming here to play was a real treat...I remember [it was] a lot more tree-lined back then. There were a lot of trees, I believe, taken out since...It was a good course back then, too. It was probably the toughest course I had seen at that point. The USGA...it's like going to a U.S. Open that Junior Amateur with the way they set it up. It was pretty tough. It still is. [Laughs] I think I lost pretty early back then."

If his memory of the course didn't help him to a share of the lead Thursday, perhaps it was his caddie. Steve Williams, the usual bag man for Tiger Woods, has been hanging with Scott the past few week as Woods' continues rehabilitation on his knee and Achilles tendon. To the benefit of those in attendance, particularly those in the photography business, "Stevie" doesn't seem nearly as hostile when he isn't with Woods. Scott and co-leader Hunter Hass tee off Friday morning at 8:15 a.m. and 8:37 a.m., respectively.

Should you be out there to take in their opening tee balls, we've put together a list of some of the better spots to hang out during the day at Aronimink. Sadly, the view from one of our favorite spots in 2010—the white fence behind the 9th tee—has been somewhat obstructed in 2011. Where before you could see both the par-5 9th and par-3 17th, members of the gallery now get a view of a massive freaking tank. It's been parked in that location so it may reside next to the Lockheed Martin chalet, a special tent for members of the military to take in the action. Is the tank cool? Yes. Is it in the way? Yes.

Rather than continue on about the tank, we'll simply do our best to pitch back into the fairway and make a four. In no particular order, here's our recommendations for the best spots camp out on the course. Many of the locations below represent the most convenient sites for accessing the greatest number holes in the shortest amount of time. Naturally, as the tournament progresses and the crowds increase, so will the traffic in many of these locales. As such, we've tried to mix a few gems that were left untouched from last year.

(1) The double-greens at 8 and 10. The green complexes of the par-3 8th and par-4 10th back right up against one another and are only separated by a small patch of fairway. The trees to the left of the 8th provide some shade while you get to watch the pros take aim from the top of a hill more than 240-yards away. Likewise, over on 10, the hole's front left pond makes for an entertaining moment or two. This is one of the most popular spots on the course and is usually the busiest area throughout each round.

(2) The bleacher seats behind the 17th green. The par-3 17th is one of, if not the best hole on the golf course. At 215-yards, the players are forced to either bail out to the right side of the green or flirt with a massive lake that drowns every golf ball short or left. This is, without question, the number-one spot to lock down come Sunday.

(3) The bleacher seats behind 18. Consider the rationale for sitting on 17, and then make the connection that the tournament ends on 18. Both spots are obviously prime, and that much harder to secure as the week progresses. Fortunately, you shouldn't have much trouble getting in either during the opening rounds.

(4) The shaded area behind the 14th green. This is particularly clutch. Not only are you under the cover of more than 100-year-old oaks, but you're within steps of both the 15th tee and 16th green. Previously, you could have also used this location to run over to the aforementioned fence behind 9. Now...there's a tank. Hooray!

(5) The rough behind the 15th green. Considering that its just paces from the 12th green and 13th and 16th tee boxes, you might ask, "why the hell is no one here?" Well, because it's kind of far and people are lazy. If you're up for the trek, it's a solid spot.

(6) The hill to the right of the 7th green. The steep hill makes for a semi-stadium effect, with each spectator clearly seeing over anyone below. Plus, the view from the 8th tee box, just a few paces to the right, is absolutely spectacular. This, like the whole golf course quite frankly, is crowded come Sunday.

(7) The driving range. It's, uh, pretty boss.

There are obviously more areas we could have included, but we'll let you find those of your own. We'll be back tomorrow with a rundown of the insane prices in the merchandise tent and other notes from the course. 'Til then.

The Rockies Twitter account tweeted whole game in 'Rocky' quotes

The Rockies Twitter account tweeted whole game in 'Rocky' quotes

If you watched Monday night's Phillies loss at the hands of the Colorado Rockies, you probably weren't very entertained -- unless you're a Rockies fan.

But if you followed the game on Twitter and happen to follow the Rockies' account, you may have been slightly more entertained.

Slightly.

They tried something we haven't seen from an opposing team just yet. They tweeted throughout the game using only quotes from the Rocky movie franchise.

Now, you can debate how successful of a move this was but you have to at least give them some points for creativity. And it's not like this was a playoff game with high stakes. This was a relatively boring Monday night game in the middle of May.

You can read our recap of the Phillies' 8-1 loss right here. Or here's how the night transpired on Twitter:

Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Sixers

Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Sixers

All week on Philly Sports Talk on CSN, we examine how our teams got to this point and where they are in the rebuilding process. 

On Tuesday, Sixers Insider Jessica Camerato takes a look at the state of the Sixers

How did we get here?
By now, you all know about “The Process.” The Sixers last competitive season was five years ago when they reached the Eastern Conference Semifinals in 2012. They began dismantling that group, and the following year, went 34-48 under Doug Collins. 

The Sixers then entered a three-year period of dismal basketball with a revolving door of players coached by Brett Brown that culminated in a 47-199 record. During that time, they stockpiled injured players, draft-and-stash prospects and a handful of future picks through transactions made by then-general manager Sam Hinkie.

Hinkie stepped down from his role with a memorable 13-page resignation letter last April. The Sixers hired Bryan Colangelo as president of basketball operations, marking a new chapter in the organization. 

The 2016-17 season was the first glimpse into the potential of “The Process.” They finished 28-54, including a 10-5 month of January. Joel Embiid made his NBA debut after two years. While he was limited to 31 games because of (another) injury, he quickly proved he can dominate when healthy. Dario Saric came to the NBA two years after being drafted in 2014 and emerged as a Rookie-of-the-Year candidate after Embiid was shut down for the season. The Sixers landed the number one pick in the 2016 draft and are waiting on the debut of Ben Simmons, who suffered a Jones fracture in training camp. This season, the Sixers established legitimate pieces for their future, rather than players who could be on the summer league team. 

Are the Sixers on the right path back to prosperity?
The Sixers are on the right path back to prosperity, and it starts this offseason. They have the third pick in the 2017 draft, with the possibilities of adding another young talent or packaging the pick to land a more established player. The Sixers have flexibility with plenty of cap space — which they could use to acquire a key free agent. The team has maintained they will not rush into making a trade just for the sake of it  — Jahlil Okafor’s future with the Sixers is still uncertain — or spending money just because it’s available. The Sixers showed flashes of potential last season. If they gather the right pieces this summer and — a big “and” — they stay healthy, the Sixers will continue to move toward an upward trend of rebuilding with the longer-term goals (this isn't happening overnight) of becoming a contender again. 

Coming Wednesday: A look at the Phillies' rebuild