Watch: Dario Saric not pleased with more water, then remembers to Trust the Friendship

Watch: Dario Saric not pleased with more water, then remembers to Trust the Friendship

We thought T.J. McConnell learned.

Remember? Pouring water on Dario Saric is not a good idea?

Yeah, thought that was clearly understood after one Sunday in January.

But McConnell was at it again on Friday night after his buddy Saric poured in a career-high 32 points during a 117-107 win over the Bulls. Just like last time, McConnell struck during Saric's postgame interview with CSN's Molly Sullivan.

And, just like last time, Saric looked like he wanted to destroy his point guard.

Look at it unfold ...

But Saric remembered his mantra: Trust the Friendship.

For the postgame moment, watch below. For highlights from Saric's career night and the full interview, watch the video above.

La Salle's B.J. Johnson declares for draft but could return for senior year

La Salle's B.J. Johnson declares for draft but could return for senior year

La Salle's B.J. Johnson has declared for the NBA draft but will not hire an agent, the junior forward announced Thursday.

Johnson (6-7/185) was the leading scorer (17.6) and rebounder (6.3) this past season for an Explorers team that went 15-15 and 9-9 in the Atlantic 10. It was his first year at La Salle after spending two seasons at Syracuse.

"My goal is to play the game I love professionally," Johnson said in a statement. "This decision will give me the opportunity to test myself, better myself and receive important feedback in pursuit of this goal."

Johnson's decision to declare for the NBA draft does not jeopardize his remaining college eligibility. 

Villanova's Josh Hart and Kris Jenkins did the same thing after winning the national championship as juniors. NCAA rules allow underclassmen to participate in the NBA scouting combine and one NBA tryout per year and then withdraw from draft consideration after the combine and return to college with full eligibility as long as they haven't hired an agent.

Pete Rose explains why Dallas Green's managerial style worked and still would today

Pete Rose explains why Dallas Green's managerial style worked and still would today

The stories have poured in since Dallas Green passed away Wednesday at 82, from the Phillies players he coached, the front office friends he made, the reporters he left a lasting impression on.

Pete Rose, who joined the Phillies in 1979, the same season Green took over for Danny Ozark late in the season, offered some thoughts of his own Thursday on 97.5 The Fanatic.

Green's managerial style
"I don't believe in pitchers becoming managers, I just don't," Rose told Rob Ellis and Harry Mayes.

"There haven't been many successful managers who were pitchers. But Dallas was a little different because Dallas understood all phases of the game of baseball. Most pitchers can throw a baseball and that's about it. But Dallas understood the hitting, the defense, and he certainly understood the bullpen.

"There's two guys that were really important in that (1980) World Championship besides Mike Schmidt and the rest of us and they were Dallas and Tug McGraw, and now they're both gone. They were two good horses to really ride and we rode the hell out of 'em."

Could Green's style work in today's game?
"Absolutely," Rose said.

"You have to know who to yell at and when to yell at them. One thing Dallas always had that I think is needed for any manager is support of the ownership. If you've got support of the ownership, it doesn't matter if a guy's making $25 million and you're making $1 million. What you say goes.

"Dallas had support of the ownership, plus another thing Dallas had is support of Schmidt. He had support of Steve Carlton. When you've got your star players in your corner, the rest of the guys are going to follow suit.

"If Schmidt or Steve didn't like Dallas, his job would have been a lot harder. But they had respect for Dallas because of the person he was and what he accomplished. I think Dallas could manage today. There's guys today that yell, that run the show."

A coincidental bit of trivia
"Dallas could chew you out but he chewed you out the right way," Rose said. "He didn't chew you out where you'd get pissed and didn't show up to the game. He chewed you out in a way where you got pissed but you wanted to show it. That's a big key right there, a big trait to have. Gene Mauch was kind of a disciplinarian and he played for Mauch.

"And I guess I can tell you that I hit one grand slam in my life and it was off Dallas Green (July 18, 1964).

"I used to joke with Dallas, 'Man, that ball would've been out of Yellowstone I hit it so good.' And he'd say, 'That ball barely scraped the fence, there's paint on the fence.'"

Rose on Mike Schmidt
"When I got there to Philadelphia, I thought Mike Schmidt was the best player in the league three or four days a week. When I got there -- and I didn't do anything I didn't do in Cincinnati or in high school -- Mike Schmidt became the best player in the league seven days a week. Because I made Mike understand you're not going to hit a home run every day. You can lead with your glove, you can lead with your base running. You can lead with your leadership.

"That's what Mike Schmidt did. He became back-to-back MVP and the best third baseman in the history of baseball."