MLB Notes: Cards, Angels swap Freese, Bourjos

MLB Notes: Cards, Angels swap Freese, Bourjos
November 22, 2013, 3:45 pm
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The Cardinals on Friday completed a four-player trade with the Angels that will send David Freese to Anaheim and Peter Bourjos to St. Louis. (USA Today Images)

ST. LOUIS -- The St. Louis Cardinals have traded former World Series MVP David Freese to the Los Angeles Angels in a four-player deal.

The Cardinals also sent reliever Fernando Salas to the Angels on Friday in exchange for outfielder Peter Bourjos and prospect Randal Grichuk.

The 30-year-old Freese was the MVP of the 2011 NLCS and the World Series, setting a major-league record with 21 postseason RBIs. He injured his back chasing a foul ball into the stands during spring training and never hit his stride last season.

He batted .262 with nine homers and 60 RBIs, drop-offs from 2012 when he hit 20 homers with 79 RBIs and batted .293.

The 26-year-old Bourjos is a career .251 hitter with speed, stealing 41 bases in 54 attempts. The 22-year-old Grichuk was an Angels first-round draft pick in 2009 and starred at Double-A Arkansas last season (see full story).

A-Rod hearing ends, decision expected in January
NEW YORK -- Now the waiting begins for Alex Rodriguez and Major League Baseball.

A-Rod's grievance hearing to overturn his 211-game suspension ended Thursday when both sides rested their cases, a day after the New York Yankees third baseman angrily walked out and decided not to testify in his own defense.

The sides set a schedule to file briefs by Dec. 11 and reply briefs by Dec. 21, which will close the record and submit the matter to arbitrator Fredric Horowitz.

His decision on whether to uphold or alter the discipline for the three-time AL MVP likely will be made in January, a person familiar with the proceedings told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.

Rodriguez's lawyers already are vowing to challenge the ruling in federal court, where judges usually are reticent to overturn an arbitration decision unless there is a finding the arbitrator was biased, exceeded his authority or failed to comply with the rules agreed to by the parties.

The timing of the case could complicate planning for the Yankees, who don't know if they will have to pay Rodriguez his $25 million salary and are unsure whether they will need a different starting third baseman (see full story).