Phillies Stay or Go: Antonio Bastardo

Phillies Stay or Go: Antonio Bastardo
October 10, 2013, 12:00 pm
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Antonio Bastardo finished the year with a 2.32 ERA in 48 appearances. (USA Today Images)

PHILLIES STAY OR GO?

Monday: Roy Halladay
Tuesday: Carlos Ruiz
Wednesday: Kevin Frandsen
Thursday: Antonio Bastardo
Friday: John Mayberry, Jr.

The Phillies' first losing season since 2002 is sure to bring wholesale changes in the offseason. But who should stay and who should go? Over the next two weeks, we're asking that very question and putting players under the microscope.

Wednesday, we examined Kevin Frandsen (see story), and today we take a look at a bullpen arm that let the team down in 2013:

Antonio Bastardo
Position: Left-handed relief pitcher
Status: Arbitration eligible; completed a one-year, $1.4 million deal in 2013

Signature game of 2013
Bastardo saved two games in 2013, but they were nothing special. Bastardo worked 10 games with no rest and didn’t bounce back too great, either. However, give Bastardo a day or two between outings and he was virtually unhittable. Opponents went 19 for 89 against the lefty when he worked with one or two days of rest, with a 2.10 ERA in 26 games.

Season as a whole
The numbers were not terrible — 3-2, two saves, 2.32 ERA, 47 strikeouts in 42 2/3 innings — but Bastardo’s season will be remembered for one event: the 50-game suspension for his role in baseball’s Biogenesis scandal. The suspension snuck up on the Phillies and left general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. and manager Charlie Manuel scrambling when the announcement came. If Bastardo knew something was coming, he didn’t clue in the Phillies or his teammates.

Otherwise, Bastardo was more efficient and threw more strikes than at any point in his career. He threw nearly 70 percent of his first pitches for strikes. He also allowed just two out of 15 inherited runners to score and was on a streak in which he did not allow a run in nine of 10 games before being suspended.

Stay or go
Typically, a reliever on pace to appear in 60-plus games for the third straight season is the type of pitcher a team needs and wants. A 28-year-old left-hander with that resume is even better. Bastardo is young and experienced and still moving into his prime.

But he really let the Phillies down over the last stretch of the season. Will he be dependable in the future? Carlos Ruiz, Freddy Galvis and Kevin Frandsen have served suspensions and come back to be model teammates. There is nothing to suggest that Bastardo will be a problem in the future, and for a bargain salary, he might be worth the risk.

What they're saying ...
“I talked with him the night before, and he said there may be something that goes on here. That was the only real heads-up I had. I don’t think the player has to tell us anything. He mentioned to me that something might be going on Sunday ... so I had an idea that something might be going on.”
--Ruben Amaro Jr. on Bastardo’s suspension, Aug. 5

“I was totally surprised. It caught me off guard. He plays a big role in our bullpen, but at the same time I go along with our organization. There’s rules and guidelines MLB has, and I think you have to abide by those. We’ll see where he is velocity-wise and command-wise in spring training, and he’ll probably get more innings than he usually gets. That will tell more about him.”
--Charlie Manuel on Bastardo’s suspension, Aug. 5

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