Phillies Stay or Go: John Mayberry Jr.

Phillies Stay or Go: John Mayberry Jr.
October 11, 2013, 9:00 am
Share This Post

John Mayberry Jr. hit .227 with 11 home runs and 39 RBIs in 2013. (AP)

PHILLIES STAY OR GO?

Monday: Roy Halladay
Tuesday: Carlos Ruiz
Wednesday: Kevin Frandsen
Thursday: Antonio Bastardo
Friday: John Mayberry, Jr.
Saturday: Kyle Kendrick

The Phillies' first losing season since 2002 is sure to bring wholesale changes in the offseason. But who should stay and who should go? Over the next two weeks, we're asking that very question and putting players under the microscope.

Today we take a look at a long-time bench piece with a high ceiling that's never quite been reached:

John Mayberry, Jr.
Position: Outfielder
Status: First-year arbitration eligible; made $517K in 2013

Signature games of 2013
Mayberry had exactly one signature game in 2013, and it was a big one.

June 4 vs. Miami. Originally entering the game as a pinch-hitter for Laynce Nix, he struck out in the seventh but stayed in the game to play right field. In his second at-bat, with the Phillies down 3-2 in the 10th, Mayberry smacked a solo homer to left-center to tie the game. Up again with the bases loaded and two outs in the 11th, he launched a walk-off grand slam — his first career salami.

Not only was it the Phillies' first walk-off grand slam since 1991 (Dale Murphy), it was the first time in major-league history a player hit the tying and game-winning homers in extra innings.

Season as a whole
Unfortunately for Mayberry and the Phillies, his incredible extra-innings heroics were merely a drop in the bucket of a pretty lousy season. His third full year as a pro was also his worst, with career lows in batting average (.227), homers (11), RBIs (39), on-base percentage (.286) and slugging (.391).

Mayberry couldn't solve his futility against right-handed pitchers, batting .221 and slugging .364 against them. His platoon splits against left-handers weren't much better (.240/.296/.460). He struck out 90 times in 384 at-bats (or once every 4.3). We could bash you over the head with endless numbers showcasing Mayberry's ineffectiveness at the plate, but we'll spare you.

Stay or go?
Mayberry has been asked to do more for the Phillies than he's capable of. He's not an everyday player and probably shouldn't even be their first outfield bench option. His defense is adequate but nothing special. He has some speed but has stolen only 14 bases in his career.

But still, what does Mayberry bring to a club? His numbers have consistently declined as he's failed to adjust to major-league pitching, and he's proven that he can't even hit opposite-handed pitching on a consistent basis.

This is an easy one. Mayberry's time in Philly is up. It's pretty safe to say the former first-round pick, who will turn 30 in December, never lived up to his potential.

What they're saying ...
"That was definitely one to remember. It feels good. I'm not going to lie to you."
--John Mayberry, Jr. on his walk-off grand slam, June 4

"Sometimes with John, if you can get him with certain pitchers, that's when he becomes much better. Sometimes, when he comes off the bench — I wouldn't call him a great pinch-hitter — but when he goes into the game, and he gets some time in the game, the next at-bat he becomes much better. He kind of runs in spurts, and tonight, well, tonight he put some good swings on the ball."
--Then-manager Charlie Manuel on Mayberry's heroics, June 4