Add Victorino and Blanton to the DL Pile, Dom Brown Won't Be Called Up

Add Victorino and Blanton to the DL Pile, Dom Brown Won't Be Called Up

Aside from the putridity of a 7-1 home loss that featured three home runs off the bat of Jason Giambi, the already short-handed Phillies are expected to lose a few more bodies to the DL. Joe Blanton was scratched from the start just prior to the game with a flare up of the elbow issues that have followed him since spring training, and Shane Victorino's hamstring finally told him it was time to shut it down.

Naturally, fans are wondering a few things today—particularly why Vic and Blanton weren't shut down sooner, as well as who will take their places and when this offensive downturn will right itself.

Blanton was allowed to pitch in Florida with a "cranky" elbow. Victorino didn't get an MRI right away, and was asked to pinch hit to lay down a successful sacrifice bunt on Wednesday night. The bunt was a key part of a 2-1 Phillies win, but while it likely didn't harm his hamstring any, it restarted the clock on when Victorino can return from the DL. Rather than having his stint end on May 30th if all goes well, he won't be eligible until June 3rd. It's not the end of the world (that starts tomorrow, fyi), but it's kinda wtf. 

Free Dom?

The best excuse for the Phillies' offensive woes—and it is a legit one—is that they've been fielding a MASH unit, with lineups half-full of should-be minor leaguers and bench players. With Victorino set to miss the next two weeks, we will see more of the same. What we won't see, for the time being anyway, is Domonic Brown. 

Ruben told reporters after the game that Brown isn't ready. And maybe he just means, right this second, he's not ready. Brown missed some time with a bum finger and could need some time getting back on track before joining the big club. Or, they just may not think he's ready in a big-picture sense. Or, maybe they're not ready to start his service time for the season. 

I won't begin to pretend I have the first clue what's best for Brown in the short or long term. I'm relatively confident the Phillies do, but it's hard not to wonder. Looking up and down the lineup and around the rest of the outfield, it's also hard to find the guys who are keeping Brown in the minors, so there are bound to be questions into the Phillies thinking on the kid until the offense comes around or Dom is in South Philly.  

Add those to the injury questions, and the only solace there is today is a look at the starting pitchers, where Roy Halladay's name is listed. 

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

ap-wells-fargo-center-flyers.jpg
The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.