Did the Phillies Fleece the Twins on the Ben Revere Trade?

Did the Phillies Fleece the Twins on the Ben Revere Trade?

The Phillies gave up two players – an 11-game winner and a prospect – to acquire Ben Revere, a shaky centerfielder with a .304 on-base percentage and zero power. Apparently in Minnesota that’s considered stealing.

Tom Powers, columnist for the St. Paul Pioneer Press, admits it’s a tad premature to pass final judgment on the swap that sent Revere to Philly in exchange for Vance Worley and prospects, but so far it looks like the Twins had their pockets picked. Worley has since sunk back to the minors, and Trevor May is still at Double A.

At least the Phillies are getting a lot of innings out of Revere, whose four-hit night against his former team on Thursday helped prevent the Fightins from being swept in that series. As of right now, the Twins have nothing to show for the move, nor the one that sent Denard Span to the Nationals for that matter.

Powers grieves:

Now it's possible, maybe even likely, that [Alex] Meyer and May become solid major league starters. And [Eric] Hicks could develop into an exceptional player. If, perchance, maybe, perhaps. But we have to be fair and give it time. However, it is fair to make short-term appraisals as long as we keep an eye on the long term. And, again, my short-term appraisal is: dreadful.

This wouldn't be so hard to take if Worley hadn't been such a disaster. The Opening Day starter, and touted as the linchpin of the rotation, Worley's earned-run average had ballooned to 7.21 before he got the boot to Rochester. Worley and May came over for Revere. Meyer was straight up for Span.

Worley could regain his form in the minors. We'll add him to the list of ifs and maybes. At some glorious juncture, all these guys could be up with the big club and making a splash.

But as it stands right now, and as short term as it may be, these trades rate a big "yuck." Of course, we'll check back later.

Unless Worley – 1-3 with a 4.74 ERA at Triple A this year – is never making it back to the Majors, Phillies fans might find it hard to describe the deal as a fleece job. Revere hasn’t been a disaster, but he’s a leadoff hitter who doesn’t get on base enough, an outfielder who misjudges fly balls and doesn’t have the arm to compensate.

He’s not exactly making folks forget about Shane Victorino.

That said, the Phils are definitely coming out on the winning end of the trade so far. Revere is still prone to defensive miscues, but his speed is a weapon for the starting lineup. Worley looks like a shell of the pitcher who was the second runner-up for NL Rookie of the Year in 2011, while May is an afterthought.

I suppose congratulations are in order for Ruben Amaro. It appears he may have successfully got one over on another GM – for now anyway.

>> Twins getting fleeced on offseason moves [Pioneer Press]

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Trout had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”