Joe West Comments on Replay Controversy

Joe West Comments on Replay Controversy

Umpire Joe West is claiming that Phillies' manager Charlie Manuel argued prior to the review that Pence's hit was a home run. From

Manuel and Jack McKeon came out of their respective dugouts to argue
the initial ruling, and crew chief Joe West said that led to the review.

had two managers on the field," West said. "One of them was arguing
that they wanted an out, and the other was arguing that he wanted a home
run. Because they wanted me to go look because they wanted a home run, I
got to judge whether it went over the fence or not.

umpire Chad Fairchild] already thought it was spectator interference.
So now we go look at the replay, and we have to take all the evidence
that we get from the replay and that's why we came up with the rule,
which is the correct ruling."

If true, Charlie's original
dispute could potentially jeopardize the team's protest.

Still, even if Charlie did ask for the review, video replay isn't supposed to be used to determine fan interference unrelated to a boundary dispute.

If anything, the team could still argue that regardless of the interference or Manuel's request, that West was justified in checking for the home run, but then violated the rules in calling Pence "out." Under this interpretation of the rules, West would only have had the authority to rule Pence's hit a home run and nothing further. If the replay did not show the ball over the fence, which it did not, then regardless of the interference, Pence should have been allowed to stay at second. While that may have resulted in the "wrong call," the Phillies could argue that by the time the review began, West lacked the authority under the rules to retroactively make "the right call" without a genuine boundary dispute.

Contrary to that argument, we are hearing reports that once umpires are under the hood, they may enforce all rules they see fit to make what they deem the right call. This would prove a more expansive authorization of video replay than was previously assumed to exist. If this is true and if Charlie did ask for the review, then the Phillies protest doesn't stand a chance. And since, as far as we can tell, Major League Baseball failed to include the language governing instant replay in their latest rulebook, we cannot comment on which interpretation of the rules, if either, is correct.

As for the rest
of the article from, at no point does Manuel mention whether or not he ever
appealed the play as a home run, though he does maintain his objection
to the replay and ruling.

Now, CSNPhilly's Jim Salisbury is reporting that West did not speak to Manuel until after the review was finished, directly contradicting West's justification for review. Regardless, Salisbury does not believe that an appeal would hold up even if the Phillies were to complete the necessary paperwork and officially file protest with the league.

>>Phillies lose in 14, Protest over Controversial Replay
>>Ricky Bottalico Tired of your Shoddy Umpiring
>>Phillies Fan Interferes with Potential Home Run in Ninth Against Cubs

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Doug Pederson not afraid to get agressive with play-calling

Talk to Doug Pederson and he comes across … what’s a nice way to put it … dry?

Very nice guy. Very friendly. Very down to Earth. But not the most dynamic personality in public.

Which is why his personality on gameday has been so surprising.

Pederson is a risk taker as a playcaller. Aggressive and fearless.

Whether it’s going for it on fourth down with the lead, going for two after a successful PAT or throwing deep in a situation that doesn’t necessarily call for it, Pederson has proven to be the proverbial riverboat gambler that Chip Kelly was expected to be but never became.

“My personality is probably a little more conservative by nature, I think,” Pederson said Monday. “You'd probably agree with that.”

Pederson got a laugh with that comment because his public persona is exactly the opposite of his gameday demeanor.

It only took one day before we all got a taste of Pederson’s fearlessness.

In the season opener against the Browns, with the Eagles clinging to a 15-10 lead and a rookie quarterback making his first NFL appearance and a 4th-and-4 at the Browns’ 40--yard-line, he kept the offense on the field.

Carson Wentz responded by connecting with Zach Ertz on a five-yard gain to move the chains, and one play later, the Eagles took command on Wentz’s 35-yard TD pass to Nelson Agholor.

Six weeks in, the Eagles are 5 for 5 on fourth down. Only the Falcons have converted more fourth downs in the NFL this year, and they’re 6 for 10.

In the win over the Bears, the Eagles were 3 for 3 on fourth down, their best fourth-down conversion day in nine years.

This is the first time in 14 years the Eagles have converted five or more fourth downs through six games.

According to Pro Football Reference, the Eagles are one of only seven teams in NFL history to attempt five or more fourth down plays through six games and still be at 100 percent. The Lions are also 5 for 5 this year.

Pederson said analytics are a big part of his decision-making process, but he also trusts his instincts.

“I think it's both,” Pederson said. “But I trust our guys and I trust our offensive line and I think it sends a great message to the rest of the team, to the defense and special teams, that, ‘Hey, if we can convert this and stay on the field,’ it sends a good message.

“And on the other side of that, if you do convert, (it’s about) the message you send to the other team and the fact that you're going to stay aggressive.”

The Eagles are 29th-best in the NFL on third down at just 34 percent. But they’re one of only three teams that’s at 100 percent on fourth down.

“It's kind of a crazy deal when you're not great on third down, but you can be 5 for 5 on fourth down and convert them,” Pederson said. “It's a weird deal. But credit to the guys for the execution.

“I'm going to continue to look at it. I don't ever want to be in a position that I'm going to jeopardize the team at the time (by being too aggressive). Looking at the five fourth-down decisions this year, I don’t think they put us in any harm at that time.”

Wentz is 3 for 3 for 21 yards on fourth down, with the four-yard completion to Ertz, a seven-yard first down to Jordan Matthews in the Bears game and a nine-yard to Dorial Green-Beckham, also in the win in Chicago.

He also rushed six yards for a first down on a 4th-and-2 Sunday in the win over the Vikings. The Eagles’ other fourth-down conversion this year was Ryan Mathews’ one-yard TD on a 4th-and-goal against Chicago.

Pederson said as an assistant coach under Andy Reid, he always found himself asking himself whether he would be conservative or aggressive in crucial situations.

We’re all learning the answer now.

“Yeah, you definitely put yourself in those situations, as a coordinator and a position coach,” he said. “Putting yourself in those spots, it's a lot easier when you're not making the decision obviously to go, ‘Oh, yeah, I would have not gone for it there or not gone for it there.’

“Now, being in this position, it's my tail on the line if we don't convert.”

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

6 months later, Cubs' Kyle Schwarber returns for World Series Game 1

CLEVELAND — Chicago Cubs slugger Kyle Schwarber's rehab finished just in time for the World Series.

Schwarber will bat fifth and be the designated hitter for the National League champions in Game 1 on Tuesday night against Cleveland's Corey Kluber. Schwarber hasn't played in the majors since tearing ligaments in his left knee on April 7 in a collision with teammate Dexter Fowler.

Dallas Cowboys orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Cooper operated 12 days later to repair torn anterior cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments. He was expected to miss the rest of the season but was cleared to return on Oct. 17.

Schwarber played a pair of games in the Arizona Fall League, going 1 for 6 with a double and two walks, and flew to Cleveland on Monday.