Mike Schmidt thinks MLB should use the force, not human umpires, to call balls and strikes

Mike Schmidt thinks MLB should use the force, not human umpires, to call balls and strikes

Michael Jack Schmidt was a guest on 97.5 the Fanatic on Thursday to talk about his new gig calling Sunday Phillies games alongside Tom McCarthy and either Jamie Moyer or Matt Stairs on the television broadcast. He hints that the broadcast may be a little different with some story telling be a welcomed addition.

He talks briefly about the skin cancer he's been dealing with over the past few months and adds that the prognosis is fantastic and that they caught it early. It'll be a battle he fights the rest of his life.

One of the more interesting things Schmidty talks about is the need for more technology in calling balls and strikes. Speed things up and make it more consistent.

“I think the umpire at home plate should not call balls and strikes," Schmidt said. "I think they should have a force field over home plate and if the pitcher throws and the ball touches the force field a little bell goes off and it’s a strike. That would expand the strike zone to the point where  the hitters would now have to swing the bat more often, which would shorten the games. The umpire needs to be at home plate for the safe and out calls at home plate and foul balls and fair balls and basically to run the game but we’re going to see at some time – my guess is within the next 10 years – that you’ll see the balls and strikes being treated just like they treat the line calls in tennis. It sounds crazy. You’d think it would be something very easy to do with what they can do electronically in our world today.”

Do force fields really exist? I always thought that was some Star Wars type stuff.

Listen to the whole Schmidt interview here.

Sixers sign Chasson Randle to second 10-day contract

Sixers sign Chasson Randle to second 10-day contract

It looks like point guard Chasson Randle has earned himself some more time in Philadelphia. 

The Sixers on Friday announced that they signed Randle to a second 10-day contract. 

Randle was first signed by the Sixers on Jan. 9 and has appeared in two games, thanks in large part to a wrist injury that forced starter T.J. McConnell to msis some time and pushed backup point guard Sergio Rodriguez into the starting lineup. 

Randle scored a career-high 10 points in 16 minutes in Monday's win over the Bucks, shooting 50 percent from the field (3 for 6) and beyond the arc (2 for 4), while also adding two rebounds and an assist. 

He played in 19 games this season for the Westchester Knicks of the NBA D-League before signing with the Sixers, leading the team in scoring with 21 points per game, including back-to-back games of 38 and 36 points in December. 

Randle went undrafted in 2015 after a four-year career at Stanford. 

Source: Sixers claim, then waive Mo Williams

Source: Sixers claim, then waive Mo Williams

Updated: 6:13 p.m.

Mo Williams was barely a Sixer.

The Sixers on Friday claimed the 34-year-old point guard, then waived him, a league source confirmed to CSNPhilly.com's Jessica Camerato. The Sixers followed it with the re-signing of guard Chasson Randle to a second 10-day contract.

ESPN's Marc Stein first reported the news of the Sixers' claiming Williams.

Per the report, the Sixers made the claim in order to get $2.2 million closer to the salary floor while preventing the Nuggets from doing so after Denver acquired Williams in a trade with the Hawks.

It's been a whirlwind two weeks for Williams, who was traded from the Cavaliers to the Hawks as part of the Kyle Korver deal. Williams was then shipped to the Nuggets, who then waived him.

Now he's been claimed and waived by the Sixers in the same day.

Williams, a veteran of 13 NBA seasons, last played for 2015-16 championship-winning Cleveland, where he played 41 regular-season contests and averaged 8.2 points and 2.4 assists per game.