Phillies Need to Reverse First-Timers Curse vs. Cleveland Tonight

Phillies Need to Reverse First-Timers Curse vs. Cleveland Tonight

Guest post by Matt Hammond

Cleveland starter Zach McAllister has been perfectly average so far.

He’s is 1-3 with a 3.52 ERA in four starts. His record’s a product of
his shoddy run support: he’s surrendered no more than two runs in any
of his starts, but the Indians have plated three or fewer for him
in each. (Before you feel sorry for him: McAllister’s 3.50 RS/9 would be
the second-most on the Phillies, ahead of Roy Halladay (3.40), Cliff
Lee (3.20) and John Lannan (3.00), and behind Kyle Kendrick’s 4.40.)
Though his ERA, which ranks 57 of 109 qualifying starters, is mostly on him.

But tonight against the Phillies, McAllister enters with a distinct
edge if you consider the way the Phillies have fared in such situations
so far: he’s never seen them before.

Four times have the Phillies faced a starter who’d never before seen
them in their careers. They’ve worked a composite 2.05 ERA and .195
opponent batting average. In other words: never seeing the Phillies
before apparently makes you Adam Wainwright.

The Phillies are 1-3 in such games.

First-timer’s advantage isn’t only a Phillies problem.

Minor leaguers flooding the majors after September callups, for
instance, thrive off the fact that there’s (a) so many of them and (b)
so little film on them. Same goes for the beginnings of most seasons,
with many fresh off spring training victories for starting rotation
spots. Same for this one, too, the first of expanded interleague play.

The problem for the Phillies is that they should’ve shelled nearly all of these guys.

Wade Davis is basically a glorified reliever, having cracked the
rotation only after leaving Tampa for Kansas City via trade and posting a
4.22 ERA as a starter between 2009-11, which ranked 77th of 126
qualifying starters over the span.

To their credit, the Phillies touched him up for four runs in as many innings.

But he was the only one of the four they got to.

The rest? KC’s Luis Mendoza, Miami’s Jose Fernandez and Pittsburgh’s
Jeff Locke, who’ve allowed a whole one run in 18 combined innings, for a
0.50 ERA. This, despite the fact that they’ve had a combined 3.91 ERA
this year with two individuals north of 4.50.

Two of them, by the way, were righties. The only lefty, Locke,
entered with a .389/.450/.500 line against lefties, for the sixth-worst
lefty batting average in baseball. (Not surprisingly, Locke was behind
five righties in this category.) And yet Locke still tossed six
scoreless innings to effectively outduel Cole Hamels in a 2-0 loss on
Apr. 23.

On the year, Locke has a 4.50 ERA.

McAllister doesn’t seem like a push-over. He has a decent K% (19.8)
and doesn’t walk too many batters (7.9%) and throws five pitches with a
mildly quick 91.5 m.p.h. fastball.

He’s just got no business gassing the Phillies — as his first-timer peers have so far.

Jimmy Fallon gives out superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players

Jimmy Fallon gives out superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players

Jimmy Fallon, the host of the Tonight Show, handed out his superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players. 

Linebacker Jordan Hicks was named “the most likely to be one of the Rugrats all grown up,” and safety Rodney McLeod was named “most likely to have been told he’d get a lollipop after the photo was taken.”

Unfortunately, there was not a superlative given to Tony Romo for being named mostly likely to be crying on the ground after getting sacked. 

The Eagles and Cowboys will face off on Sunday Night Football, when we will see the first battle between rookie quarterbacks Carson Wentz and Dak Prescott.

Check out the video for yourself right here.

Phillies fans woke up Rays' players during 2008 World Series

Phillies fans woke up Rays' players during 2008 World Series

The lore of Philly sports fans continue to grow. 

And this time, nothing was thrown.

Current Cubs and former Rays manager Joe Maddon said that during the 2008 World Series, Phillies fans found the hotel his team was staying at, and honked car horns throughout the night, keeping the team up.

"The Philly fans, they knew we were there somehow," Maddon told reporters Wednesday. "Five o’clock in the morning they’re driving around the hotel blowing the horn, trying to wake everybody up at 5:00 in the morning, 6:00 in the morning…."

Maddon says the team had already checked out of their original hotel before Game 5, but because the game was suspended, the Rays had to book another hotel in the area.

Through some impressive detective work, fans found the team's hotel and did their best to wake up the Rays throughout the early morning.

Did it work?

It must have, because the Rays allowed a leadoff double to Geoff Jenkins (remember that guy?) to resume the game.

You have to be pretty exhausted to allow a hit to that guy.