Report: Red Sox Interested in Trade for Michael Young, Yankees a Fit

Report: Red Sox Interested in Trade for Michael Young, Yankees a Fit

As we get set to turn the calendar over to July, expect trade deadline discussion to intensify over the course of the next few weeks. The Phillies are still 7.5 games out of a playoff spot, and appear increasingly incapable of shifting out of neutral, losing again Saturday night 4-3 to the Dodgers.

One team that’s clearly looking to add at the deadline is the Red Sox. They’ve already been linked to Jonathan Papelbon, expensive closers being a luxury for sub-.500 ball clubs. Now the latest news has them in pursuit of Michael Young. According to George A. King III for the New York Post (via SB Nation), the Sox are “very interested” in the veteran infielder if he becomes available.

“They want him badly,’’ an industry source said of the Red Sox, who demoted the struggling Will Middlebrooks to the minors and are playing Jose Inglesias at third base.

Despite Boston’s seemingly high level of interest in Young, the story tends to focus on the Yankees, who also might be in the market for a third baseman. New York is mentioned here as a possible destination for Carlos Ruiz as well.

King says the Phillies had two scouts at Yankee Stadium last week, so it sure sounds like there could be some action there.

The Phillies acquired Young from Texas as a stopgap at third base after they declined to pick up Placido Polanco’s option. Young is a free agent at the end of the season, and the organization has prospects in the farm system – Cody Asche at Lehigh Valley and Maikel Franco at Reading.

In other words, if they aren’t making a run at the postseason he becomes expendable.

The Rangers agreed to pay all but $6 million of Young’s salary, so he’s attractive from a value standpoint. He does have a no-trade clause, but waived it once already to come to Philly.

What another general manager would be willing to part with to obtain the 36 year old is another matter. Kevin Cooney writes in today’s Courier Times that he may not fetch much in return. The Phillies sent relievers Josh Lindblom and Lisalverto Bonilla to Texas in the deal for Young.

Young has performed to about the level of expectations coming into this season. His .287 batting average is good for second in the clubhouse – one point behind Ben Revere – to go with five home runs and 21 runs batted in through 75 games. He is second in the National League with 16 groundout double plays however.

While GMs are leisurely pushing their shopping carts around the Phillies roster, much of what happens will be determined over the next few weeks. But once Ruben Amaro determines his team is out of contention, Michael Young should be high on the short list of players who can move.

>> Red Sox, Yankees eyeing Phillies’ Young [NY Post]
>> The Market Report: Will Phils wheel and deal? [Burbs]

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

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The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.