Vance Refrigerates Cubs, as Offense Rolls to Eighth Consecutive Series Win

Vance Refrigerates Cubs, as Offense Rolls to Eighth Consecutive Series Win

The Philadelphia Phillies hammered the Chicago Cubs by a final score of 9 to 1 on an oppressively hot afternoon at Wrigley. Local temperatures hovered just shy of 100-degrees for the majority of the game, while Chicago heat indexes soared into the triple digits.

The Phillies, undaunted by the sweltering heat, gave Cubs' starting pitcher Ryan Dempster far more than he could handle during the early innings. A Ryan Howard single to left and a Shane Victorino groundout into a fielder's choice scored Michael Martinez and Chase Utley, respectively, to put the visiting Phils up 2-0 after the first.

Just one inning later, the flood gates would open.
With two down in the top of the second, pitcher Vance Worley cracked a double to reach base and extend what was assumed to be a closed inning. From there, the Phillies would tack on on three more runs thanks to a Jimmy Rollins double, Michael Martinez single, Michael Martinez stolen base and a Chase Utley double.
 
After surrendering five runs on 64 pitches through only two innings, Dempster would survive just one more frame. Thankfully, the Phils took that extra inning to tag Dempster for additional run thanks to a two-out double from Brian Schneider. By the time the book was closed on Dempster, he bore responsibility for 6 earned on 7 hits via a whopping 86 pitches in just 3 innings of work.

The Phillies would later add three more on the Cubs' bullpen thanks to Chase Utley's second double of the day and two Jimmy Rollins solo shots, each one batted from a different side of the plate.

To put it in perspective, only four times in Phillies history has a batter knocked two home runs in the same game batting from the right and left. With his performance today, Jimmy Rollins is responsible for two of those four occasions, a somewhat unsurprising fact. An infinitely more surprising fact, the last Phillie to complete such a feat besides Rollins—Tomás Orlando Pérez in 2001.

The obvious leaders of the offense this afternoon, Jimmy Rollins and Chase Utley finished the day a combined 5-8 with 5 RBIs and 5 runs scored.

Not to be lost in their impressive shuffle, however, was the play of the rapidly-improving Michael Martinez. Since July 1st, Martinez has failed to play in just three games while filling in for the injured Placido Polanco. Over that eleven game stretch, with today's game excluded from his monthly total, Martinez is batting a hefty .297 in July, consequently raising his season average an impressive .30 points. During today's game in Chicago, Martinez reached base twice, scored twice, stole a bag and knocked in a run.

Speaking of not getting lost in the shuffle, or getting buried at the bottom of the post, Vance Worley more than held up his end of the bargain. Despite the aforementioned temperatures, Worley gave up just one hit over his first six shutout innings. Though a rough start to the seventh would see Vance load the bases with no outs and ultimately give up a run, he would work his way out of the jam thanks to a nifty save by Jimmy Rollins and a timely Jimmy to Chase to Ryan double play. His final line in the sweltering Chicago heat: 8.0 IP, 4H, 1ER, 2BB, 7K, on 111 pitches.

From there, manager Charlie Manuel would opt to turn the ball over to Ryan Madson. In his third appearance since returning from the disabled list, Mad Dog needed just eight pitches to force three pop ups to end the ninth.

We hope you enjoyed our coverage from Chicago over the past few days. For today's game, E took advantage a well-deserved day off, drank a beer or two and watched the action from the stands. In honor of his decision, and Vance Worley's gem of an outing, we leave you with this clip from the Chicago-based Ferris Bueller's Day Off:

Eagles Stay or Go Part 6: Taylor Hart to Donnie Jones

Eagles Stay or Go Part 6: Taylor Hart to Donnie Jones

In the sixth of our 12-part offseason series examining the future of the Eagles, Reuben Frank and Dave Zangaro give their opinions on who will be and who won't be on the roster in 2017. We go alphabetically — Part 6 is Hart to Jones.

Taylor Hart

Roob: No matter how hard the Eagles try, they just can't get rid of Taylor Hart. Chip Kelly drafted Hart in the fifth round in 2014 and then Hart began last season with Kelly in San Francisco before reappearing here later in the season. Hart is going into his fourth NFL season and has 15 games, 12 tackles and no sacks to show for it. He turns 26 next month and has never shown any signs of being a guy who can contribute in a 4-3 defense. I’m going to say he goes, but don't be surprised if he finds his way back onto the roster at some point. 

Verdict: GOES

Dave: Hart was with the Eagles last training camp but cut him on Sept. 4 and he was claimed by the 49ers and Chip Kelly. Then when the Niners cut him, the Eagles claimed him back and he spent the rest of the season watching the Eagles play football. He was inactive in all but the last game and in that one he didn’t play. Hart is a former fifth-round pick who just fits better in a 3-4. The Eagles already played undrafted rookie Destiny Vaeao over him, so it’s time to set him free. 

Verdict: GOES

Jordan Hicks
Cap hit: $796K

Roob: Whenever you blast Chip for getting rid of Shady, DeSean and Jeremy Maclin, you have to mention that he did draft Jordan Hicks in the third round. Hicks, in just 24 games, has become one of the most productive playmaking linebackers in Eagles history. With seven interceptions, he already has the 11th-most interceptions in franchise history by a linebacker, and he led all NFL linebackers with five INTs this past season. Only four linebackers in NFL history have had more interceptions in their first two seasons – Hall of Famer Jack Ham is one of them. But Hicks is more than a ballhawk. He’s a smart, heady linebacker who is stout at the point of attack and is already developing into a terrific locker room leader as well. The future is certainly bright for Hicks.

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: He just finished his second year in the NFL, but Hicks is quickly becoming one of the biggest playmaking linebackers in the league. Through the first 24 games of his career, he has seven interceptions. In his first two years, he has 7 INTs, 4 FRs, 1 FF. He’s the fifth player in NFL history to do that in his first two seasons and he’s the only linebacker. That said, Hicks needs to get better against the run and he knows it. Now that he won’t have an injury to heal from this offseason, he plans on hitting the weight room to get stronger and better at stopping the run. He looks like a cornerstone of the franchise. 

Verdict: STAYS

Malcolm Jenkins
Cap hit: $7.5M

Roob: Jenkins had another good year in his third season with the Eagles, although not quite up to his Pro Bowl level of 2015. Jenkins, who turns 30 late next season, is on the books for another four years with some pretty high cap figures — $7.5 million in 2017, then $10 million, $9.75 million and $9.25 million. But as long as Jenkins continues to play at a high level, I don’t see him going anywhere until after the 2018 season at the earliest, when he would count just $3 million in dead money if he’s released. But Jenkins is a guy you'd like to see finish his career in Philly. Hope that happens. 

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: It’s hard to quantify just how much Jenkins means to the Eagles or how much he’s worth. But it’s a lot. The last two seasons have been the best of his career and he’s shown no signs of slowing down. The best Jenkins stat is this: He’s missed just eight defensive snaps since arriving in 2013. Unreal. If the Eagles chose to play him at cornerback last year, he would have probably been their best one. 

Verdict: STAYS

Lane Johnson
Cap hit: $10M

Roob: If he goes, it’ll be because of a third positive drug test. Johnson’s play in the six games he was available to the Eagles was at an All-Pro level. But after two positive tests for banned substances and suspensions of four games in 2014 and 10 games in 2016, he’s now one positive test away from a two-year ban that would essentially end his Eagles career. My gut feeling is Johnson has learned his lesson and won’t take any more chances. That he understands what’s at stake here and isn’t going to risk his career by taking a supplement that hasn’t been pre-tested and cleared. Obviously there are other reasons the Eagles were 5-1 when Johnson played. Those five wins included games against the hapless Browns and Bears and a win against a Cowboys team that wasn’t trying to win. But that said, Johnson’s value is clear. He's a beast. It’s up to Johnson whether he becomes a Pro Bowl offensive tackle or a casualty of the NFL’s substance abuse regulations. I can’t imagine he’ll make the same mistake again.

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: A lot was made about Johnson’s suspension voiding the guaranteed portion of his contract. And for a week or so, a bunch of fans were calling into talk radio saying the Eagles should cut him. That was laughable. Johnson is still the Eagles’ best offensive player and as long as he stays on the field and plays the way he did in 2016, he’s going to make most of the money in his contract. He obviously deserves plenty of blame for the way last season went, but he’s a big piece of the future. One more suspension and his career is basically over, so the Eagles just have to hope he doesn’t ruin everything.  

Verdict: STAYS

Marcus Johnson

Roob: Johnson is an interesting guy. Ran a 4.37 so he has wheels, but he didn’t have much of a career at Texas. Then again, Texas didn’t have a legit quarterback while he was there so maybe there’s a lot of untapped potential. The Eagles are so desperate for help at wide receiver they’ll take a good long look at everybody on the roster, even a guy who bounced off and on the practice squad last year. This Longhorn is a longshot to make the roster, but then again, if he catches the football consistently in training camp he’ll give himself a fighting chance.

Verdict: GOES

Dave: The receiver was with the Eagles during training camp and flashed some before getting hurt. He joined the practice squad during the season and was there at season’s end. He’ll be brought to camp but is a longshot to make the roster. 

Verdict: GOES

Donnie Jones
Cap hit: $1.25M

Roob: At 36 years old, the greatest punter in Eagles history (sorry Mat McBriar) showed no signs of slowing down. In his 13th NFL season, Jones averaged 45.8 yards per punt with a 40.7 net – both above his career highs. The most amazing thing about Jones is his knack for dropping punts inside the 20 without hitting very many touchbacks. He had 21 inside the 20 this year with just six touchbacks, and in four seasons with the Eagles he has 117 inside the 20 with just 26 touchbacks. When you don’t have an explosive offense, field position is critical, and Jones is a human field position flipping machine. The Eagles signed him to a three-year extension this year, and he’s now under contract through 2019.

Verdict: STAYS

Dave: At times during the last two seasons, Jones has looked like the offense’s best weapon. That’s not a good sign for the offense, but it is for Jones. He’s already the best punter in team history. He’ll be 37 by the time the 2017 season starts, but he just signed a contract and will be the team’s punter for at least a couple more years if everything goes to plan. 

Verdict: STAYS