Video: Phillies Fans Still Excited to Receive Hunter Pence Bobblehead Long After His Trade to San Fran

Video: Phillies Fans Still Excited to Receive Hunter Pence Bobblehead Long After His Trade to San Fran

"It's a bobblehead. Who's not excited about a bobblehead?"

That seemed to be the prevailing fan sentiment at Citizens Bank Park prior to Tuesday night's Phillies game against the Cincinnati Reds.

The scheduled giveaway for the evening was a bobble figurine of former Phillie and current San Francisco Giant Hunter Pence. Pence quickly became something of a fan favorite in Philadelphia, partly because of his quirky, powerful swing and "Let's Go Eat!" tagline, but also because of his athletic physique - at least that's what one particular lady told us. The giveaway was scheduled months ago, long before Pence was traded to the left coast, but as the team said, what else were they going to do with 45,000 bobbleheads other than give them away?

We set up shop along the first base gate to gauge fan reactions to receiving the piece of Pence paraphernalia. Were they still excited to get a Pence bobble even though he was traded? Had they long been planning to come to this game for the bobble alone? And finally, what did they plan on doing with it now that he's playing for the Giants?

We were kind of hoping for a few crazy answers at either end of the spectrum. Something like, "I plan to put it in the middle of my Hunter Pence shrine right next to my giant fork." Or on the flip side, someone throwing it in a trash can immediately after receiving it.

We didn't get either of those, but one lady (who didn't want to be filmed) did ask her friends if she should give it back because she didn't really want it.

For the most part, fans were excited to stash their little Hunter Pence figurine right in the middle of their existing bobble collection and said they'd remember Hunter's time in Philadelphia fondly.

Pence, playing right field for San Francisco tonight, would agree with that sentiment and attached a note to Phillies fans on each bobblehead:

"Thanks, Phillies fans, for the great memories. I'm glad my Bobble Figurine will still be given out oven though I'm no longer in Philadelphia. I hope it will serve as a lasting reminder of my time there. It was a year of my career that I will never forget."

Sevyn Streeter claims Sixers stopped her from singing national anthem

Sevyn Streeter claims Sixers stopped her from singing national anthem

Performing artist Sevyn Streeter was scheduled to sing the national anthem Wednesday night before the Sixers' season opener but says she was replaced because of the jersey she was wearing.

Jemila Worthy, a member of the Sixers' dance team, sang the anthem instead.

Streeter says change was made because she was wearing a jersey with the words "We Matter" displayed on the front.

"I'm at the 76ers game to sing the national anthem," she said in a video on Twitter, "and the organization is telling me that I can't because I'm wearing a 'We Matter' jersey."

The Sixers responded with the following statement:

"The Philadelphia 76ers organization encourages meaningful actions to drive social change. We use our games to bring people together, to build trust and to strengthen our communities. As we move from symbolic gestures to action, we will continue to leverage our platform to positively impact our community."

In the Sixers' preseason finale against the Heat in Miami, Denasia Lawrence performed the anthem while wearing a "Black Lives Matter" shirt and kneeling on one knee (see story). She said she did it to protest racial oppression.

Streeter is the latest to use the national anthem as a stage to protest racism and social injustice. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began the well-documented movement by refusing to stand during the anthem, and various other professional athletes have made their own statements.

In a protest planned by safety Malcolm Jenkins, a handful of Eagles raised their fists during the anthem before the team's Week 2 game against the Bears on Monday Night Football.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.