5 observations from Sixers-Wizards

5 observations from Sixers-Wizards

November 1, 2013, 10:00 pm

Michael Carter-Williams 14 points, five assists and three rebounds in the Sixers' win over the Wizards. (USA Today Images)

WASHINGTON -- The Sixers followed up their stunning opening night win over the Miami Heat with another improbable victory on Friday night against the Washington Wizards.

Trailing by as many as 14 points throughout the first three quarters, the Sixers rallied to tie the game after three before surging to a 109-102 victory (see Instant Replay).

The Sixers are 2-0 for the first time since the 2006-07 season when they began the year 3-0.

Here are a few items that caught our attention in Friday’s game:

1. Before the game, Sixers head coach Brett Brown talked about how the Sixers can best contain John Wall.

“Get back! Run as fast as you can and get back! It really is that simple,” Brown said.

Or was it. Wall, perhaps the fastest player in the league in terms of raw speed, was a monster in the open court. Though the Sixers were able to get back on Wall, the guard either slipped past with a quick move or was able to draw contact.

Before the game, Brown talked about Wall finishing his drives to the hoop with contact.

“You have to give him some cushion. You don’t want to be static, you don’t want to be stuck, so you have to give some cushion,” Brown said. “When someone is moving that fast you’ll have to absorb some of that and it’s much easier to talk about than to do it.

“I saw it for years with Tony Parker. He just loved finishing into people’s bodies. He'd run right at him and get up and go at them, so you have to avoid being static. You have to keep moving.”

Like Brown said, easier said than done. Wall scored 15 points in the first quarter and had 23 at the half.

But in the second half Wall had just three points, as the Sixers were able to get back on defense and cut off the drives to the basket.

2. The Sixers’ half-court offense still needs some help. In the early part of the game, the lack of movement hurt the Sixers’ shot selection and they often settled for three-pointers when a better shot might have been available.

The Sixers went 0 for 9 from three-point range and ran just one pick-and-roll play. And guess what? Lavoy Allen and Tony Wroten ran the play well enough to get a layup.

3. Though the Sixers were down by as many as 14 points from the first quarter into the third quarter, they were able to whittle away at the Wizards’ lead by forcing bad shots.

The Wizards attempted nine long two-pointers during the third quarter after attempting nine during the entire first half. Meanwhile, the Sixers continued to get shots in the paint. They also hit a few three-pointers, too. After the 0 for 9 in the first quarter, the Sixers went 6 for 14 the rest of the way.

4. Give Michael Carter-Williams some credit for showing some grit. Despite committing two turnovers in the first two minutes of the game, the rookie didn’t commit another for the rest of the game.

He didn’t back off his game either. After shooting 1 for 6 in the first half, MCW went 5 for 9 in the second half.

5. Spencer Hawes (16 points, 14 rebounds) could be the Sixers’ best three-point threat. He shot 3 for 6 from deep on Friday and because of his ability to hit the long ball, he was able to make passes from the high post to teammates cutting to the hoop.