6 observations from Sixers-Pistons

6 observations from Sixers-Pistons

January 10, 2014, 9:45 pm
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One game after posting just four points in 17 minutes, Evan Turner dropped 19 on Detroit in 37 minutes. (AP)

BOX SCORE

The Sixers scored 63 points against the Pistons in the first half -- their second-best output in a single game before intermission this season. The Sixers were also up by 16 at one point.

And they blew it.

After a hot start, the Sixers cooled considerably and lost to the Pistons, 114-104, at the Wells Fargo Center on Friday (see Instant Replay). It was the Sixers' third straight defeat and their fifth loss in the last six meetings against Detroit. The win snapped a six-game losing streak for the Pistons.

Some observations from the game:

1. Thaddeus Young played just 21 minutes in the Sixers’ game against the Cavaliers in Cleveland on Tuesday. Part of that was because the Sixers got blown out, and part of it was owed to fatigue, according to Young.

Young looked better and played much more on Friday. He tied for a game-high 22 points to go with four rebounds and two assists in 40 minutes.

2. Evan Turner didn’t play much against Cleveland either, logging only 17 minutes. Against the Pistons, Turner had more points (8) in the first seven minutes than he did in the entire game against the Cavs (4). Turner finished with 19 points, five rebounds and a steal in 36 minutes against the Pistons.

3. Turner should probably think twice before trying to dunk on Andre Drummond again. In the second quarter, Turner went strong to the hoop and tried to throw down a two-handed dunk. Drummond blocked it with one hand, and without much trouble. The Detroit center is having an excellent season, and he’s averaging more than a block and a half per game. He is a man. And a monster. He’s a man-monster. For the game, the Pistons had an insane, almost-impossible 14 blocks. Drummond had six of them.

4. The Sixers aren’t good at stopping the three-pointer. You probably heard. They entered Friday allowing 10.3 threes per game (most in the NBA). The Pistons aren’t good at making threes. You might not have heard. Detroit came to Philly hitting just 6.1 threes per game (27th). But as it goes with most teams, the Pistons shot much better than usual against the Sixers. Detroit hit 11 of 30 from beyond the arc. At some point, the Sixers have to defend shots from distance -- don’t they? Or maybe they’ll just wait until next year for that.

5. The Sixers entered Friday evening as a slightly better rebounding team than the Pistons, averaging 0.7 more rebounds per game than Detroit. That was somewhat surprising considering the Pistons employ Drummond (12.7 rpg) and Greg Monroe (8.9 rpg), both of whom are in the top 20 in the league in rebounds per game. Detroit also has Josh Smith. And while Smith has been somewhat inconsistent this season, he went into the game averaging 6.8 rebounds.

Meanwhile, Spencer Hawes (8.6 rpg) is the only Sixer among the top 40 rebounders in the league. And with Lavoy Allen out with a right calf injury, it looked like the Pistons might dominate the Sixers on the glass. (OK, OK, Allen isn’t great, but he’s still a large human who occupies space under the basket.) That's what happened. The Pistons crushed the Sixers on the boards, out-rebounded their hosts by 20. The disparity was particularly ugly on the offensive glass, where there Pistons had a 25-13 advantage.

6. Friday was the first of a back-to-back for the Sixers, who play the Knicks at home on Saturday evening. It was also the first outing in a four-game homestand for the Sixers. The Sixers have lost five of their last six at home this season. They’re 7-10 overall at the Wells Fargo Center. The Sixers have had a winning record at home in 14 of the last 15 seasons. A year ago, they went 23-18 at the Wells Fargo Center.