Carter-Williams' leeway with Sixers paying off

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Carter-Williams' leeway with Sixers paying off

The Sixers are just 15 games into the 82-game season, but some things are clearly taking shape, starting with a strong Rookie of the Year candidate.

Michael Carter-Williams is averaging 17.3 points, 5.7 rebounds, 7.4 assists and three steals in 36.2 minutes a night.

All of those numbers lead their respective categories among rookies.

There is only one other rookie averaging double-figure points, and that's Orlando’s Victor Oladipo (12.7). Only eight first-year players average at least 20 minutes.

Carter-Williams is on the fast track to being the first Sixers rookie since Allen Iverson to be named Rookie of the Year. Since Iverson won the award in the 1996-97 season, the lowest selected player in the draft to earn Rookie of the Year was Amar'e Stoudemire, whom the Suns drafted with the ninth overall pick in the 2002 draft.

Carter-Williams came to the Sixers last June at pick No. 11.

“I think there is nothing like opportunity. Let’s start there,” Brett Brown said of Carter-Williams' early success. “He is getting big minutes. He has a green light and a freedom to play and at times make mistakes, and I think that counts for a lot.

“But once he has had that situation, his talent and his skill level is far greater than I imagined. The thing that I still stand by is there is a toughness and a leadership emerging in him that he projects out, and I get excited. He has a far greater intellect as a point guard than I also would have guessed.”

“I came to a great situation,” Carter-Williams said. “I was fortunate and lucky to play and have an opportunity. That is a big part of it, but you also have to perform.”

One could argue that Carter-Williams is putting up All-Star numbers. He and Chris Paul are the only two guards in the league averaging at least 15 points, 6.0 assists and 5.0 rebounds per game.

If you take away the rebounding category, there are 12 guards averaging a minimum of 15 points and 6.0 assists, but just four play in the Eastern Conference. In addition to MCW, the guards from the East include Jeff Teague, Brandon Jennings and Kyrie Irving.

All-Star appearances seem to go hand-in-hand with paying dues, but it can happen for a rookie.

Carter-Williams has shown no lingering effects from the bruised arch he suffered in his left foot that sidelined him for four games. He declared the injury “completely fine.”

MCW feels he is getting the hang of the NBA, but like all players finds answering the bell on a consistent basis to be a work in progress.

“Maintaining every single day,” Carter-Williams said was the hardest adjustment from college to the pros. “Just going out there and performing every day whether it is at a practice or in a game.”

It is interesting to see the identity of the Sixers transforming with Brown pacing the sidelines and Carter-Williams running the on-court show.

Two years ago, their leading scorer, Lou Williams, came off the bench and averaged 14.9 points -- fewest among leading scorers on any NBA team.

Now the Sixers are one of three teams in the league that boast three players averaging 16.7 points or more with Carter-Williams, Evan Turner and Spencer Hawes.

Golden State has the scoring trio of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and David Lee, while Portland has LaMarcus Aldridge, Damian Lillard and Wesley Matthews.

With the Warriors becoming a true threat out West and the Blazers riding an 11-game win streak, the Sixers hope their future is just as bright.

Report: Nerlens Noel upset with Sixers' situation at center

Report: Nerlens Noel upset with Sixers' situation at center

After being in the middle of trade rumors over the last few months, Nerlens Noel appears to frustrated with his situation with the Sixers, according to the Inquirer's Keith Pompey.

The Sixers have three starting-caliber centers — Noel, Jahlil Okafor and Joel Embiid, who's now healthy — heading into this season.

"I think it's just silly," Noel told Pompey. "With the departure of [former general manager and president] Sam Hinkie, I would have figured that management would be able to set something done this summer.

"Don't get me wrong. We all get along great on the court and off the court. But at the end of the day, it's like having three starting quarterbacks. It doesn't make any sense.

"And it's just not going to work to anybody's advantage having that on the same team. That's how I'm looking at it. I'm not opposed to anything, but things need to be situated."

The Sixers flirted with having two big men on the court at the same time last season, with Noel and Okafor but with no real success. 

He has a point, and the team knows it.

During the summer, reports swirled saying the Sixers were looking to trade either Noel or Okafor for backcourt help.

Noel, who's in the final year of his rookie contract, doesn't appear to believe the current situation will work.

"I think something needs to happen," he said.

Bryan Colangelo: 'Never a period of discomfort' with Sixers' bigs

Bryan Colangelo: 'Never a period of discomfort' with Sixers' bigs

CAMDEN, N.J. — The Sixers on Friday unveiled their brand new, state-of-the-art practice facility in Camden, New Jersey (see story).

Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo, while speaking to media members at the ribbon-cutting ceremony, touched on a variety of topics. That included the team's surplus of big men, an issue that has been years in the making.  

One of the major questions surrounding the Sixers this offseason is how the team plans to utilize all three of its talented young big men in Nerlens Noel, Jahlil Okafor and Joel Embiid. With Embiid finally healthy and on track to play this season, the Sixers have some tough decisions when it comes to balancing playing time as well as maximizing each player's potential.  

There have been rumors throughout the summer that Colangelo has been actively trying to shop either Noel or Okafor because of his discomfort with having three big men on the roster. His comments on Friday cleared up the situation. 

"We're excited for the season. We’re excited to have three, talented young players that can play that position," Colangelo said. "I said something this summer that was somewhat tongue and cheek that was taken so seriously and everybody hung on that one word that I would be uncomfortable going into the season or absolutely uncomfortable, it was literally overstated so many different times. It was never a period of discomfort, in fact, it's actually comfortable knowing we have that much talent there.

"The discomfort comes in trying to manage and maintain the happiness of three talented young players and that’s something that I think will work itself out."

This offseason has been one of transition for the Sixers. The days of "The Process" are long gone, and the Sixers seem poised to finally become a competitive franchise again after years of tanking.

During their summer overhaul, the Sixers brought in nine new players in hopes of forming a roster that features actual NBA-caliber players that could compete on a nightly basis. 

The team now not only features a surplus of bigs, but for the first time in a long time, a healthy balance of talent at each position. 

"The availability of those players is going to be an experiment all season long, not just with the bigs but with this entire team," Colangelo said. "We’ve got a good mix of talent and there's going to be a lot of competition at every position."

Colagelo expressed that under the former regime ran by Sam Hinkie, the Sixers lacked any sort of competitive drive and identity, something that he emphasized greatly when first put in charge. 

"We really have brought some things to this team that I think was sorely lacking," Colangelo said. "One was veteran leadership, whether it's Gerald Henderson, Jerryd Bayless or bringing Elton Brand back. Playmaking ability between Jerryd Bayless, Sergio Rodriquez, Dario Saric coming into the mix, Ben Simmons — these are playmakers as much as they are good basketball players and scorers.

"So we’ve got a good mix of talent, but what we actually have will play itself out on the court in the coming months."