Competition to be wide open for in-shape Sixers

slideshow-sixers-brett-brown-ap.jpg

Competition to be wide open for in-shape Sixers

Hey, are you a basketball player looking to show off your skills? Can you shoot, run all day and play a little defense, too?

In that case, Sixers head coach Brett Brown might be looking for you …

OK, it’s not exactly a want ad or a Craigslist posting. But with the opening of NBA training camps coming in the next two days, the 76ers have an abundance of what many players are seeking and the team’s new coach thinks it can be a selling point to motivate his players.

“How would you like to be a young guy coming into the Sixers with an abundance of minutes available?” Brown said during Wednesday’s media availability. “Of course we need shooters, but they’re hard to find. We want people that compete.”

For the plethora of young players headed to camp with the Sixers this weekend, from high draft picks like Nerlens Noel and Michael Carter-Williams to the undrafted players trying to catch on with a team like Khalif Wyatt, Brown’s selling point sounds almost too good to be true.

If a player wants an opportunity to compete, the field is wide open.

“This year’s team is about development,” Brown said.

There will be some prerequisites, of course. To start with, players better show up in camp in shape because fitness and the ability to use that youthful exuberance will be the Sixers’ only means to compete this season. After all, the Sixers will be short on experience and talent, but they should be able to lead the league in youth and energy.

Brown’s predecessor, Doug Collins, was a stickler for fitness, routinely weighing players to see if they were getting sloppy -- or worn down -- as the season wore on. But Brown is making fitness his hallmark. It’s all about development, Brown says, and the young players are going to have to figure it out quickly.

“As a professional athlete, it’s your responsibility to get in great shape,” Brown said. “Your skin-fold test (measuring body fat) is this and your weight is this. That’s non-negotiable.”

Coming from San Antonio where Brown was an assistant coach under Gregg Popovich, the Sixers’ coach saw what focusing on fitness did for future Hall of Famer Tim Duncan. As he aged, Duncan’s weight climbed to a little more than 270 pounds. That weight mixed with his 6-foot-11 frame left Duncan ripe for injuries and ineffectiveness.

But when Duncan returned in 2012-13 at a svelte 240 pounds, it was as if he had found the fountain of youth and the Spurs were minutes away from winning another NBA championship.

So, for those young ballplayers looking for a chance to play and compete with an NBA team, get in shape. Brett Brown might have a spot for you.

Elton Brand on national anthem protests: Sixers working with NBA, having 'discussions internally'

Elton Brand on national anthem protests: Sixers working with NBA, having 'discussions internally'

CAMDEN, N.J. — Pockets of NBA players have increasingly started to speak up about what they believe to be racial and social injustices taking place in the United States.

With San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to kneel during the national anthem sparking protests from other players around the NFL and various sports, now the NBA as a whole is preparing for potential protests prior to games.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver and National Basketball Players Association union executive director Michele Roberts came together last week to formulate a joint letter to players to express how the two sides plan to take "meaningful action."

Whatever that action is, Sixers veteran Elton Brand is all for it and the overall discussion of issues going on around the country.

"There are e-mails and direct texts from the NBPA. We’re working with the NBA. They’re going to talk to us soon,” Brand said. “My thing is if you want to stand up for something, that’s a good thing. Especially in America, the tensions and the injustices that are going on right now. 

“Even in our locker room we’re discussing who feels like this, who feels like what and ways that we can display how we feel about things. I’m all for it. I stand behind it and stand with other athletes and people that want to stand for a cause. Whatever their cause is, they want to stand for a cause. Our cause may be different.”

The NBA is significantly more diverse than the NFL, and Brand even admitted it’s been an eye-opening experience having talks about issues affecting African Americans inside a locker room with players from around the globe.

“We have a lot of international players,” he said. “I’m looking around the room and there are seven people that aren’t from this country. So you talk about the flag, talk about the constitution and to them it’s like, ‘I represent America because I’m working here, but I’m pro-Spain and I have problems there, too.’ We’re all sorting it out. We’ve had discussions internally also. I’m looking forward to what the NBPA and the NBA have to offer."

What the league and players association come up with will likely serve as something other than protesting during the actual anthem. Unlike the NFL, the NBA has a rule in place that explicitly states players, coaches and trainers must stand on the foul line or sidelines in a dignified posture during the playing of national anthems.

If Sixers players do ultimately decide on some sort of protest before games, they will have the support of the organization to express their rights.

"We haven't been together collectively long enough to have a real robust discussion about it," Sixers president Bryan Colangelo said. "I think we just addressed it briefly this morning with the players in an opportunity to say the following. Basically, we as an organization are going to be supportive of the views of our players. As the league and the players association formulate perhaps an approach, they've already circulated some information to teams. Things are probably still at the discussion phase. I hope to think that's where things are with our players, that they're still at the discussion phase. 

"Once again, I'm assuming that there will be a desire to express an opinion or viewpoint. I've always been supportive of people in society having freedom to express a viewpoint. Again, going back to the league and the players association, in a positive way I think they've always been out in front of some of these social issues and if they can affect social change in a positive way they probably will. You can just anticipate that there's still some unknowns to this, but you can estimate that we will be supportive as an organization as to how our players want to express their views."

Joel Embiid expects to play in Sixers' preseason opener

Joel Embiid expects to play in Sixers' preseason opener

CAMDEN, N.J. — The long wait could be over next week.

Joel Embiid expects to play in the Sixers' first preseason game Oct. 4 at UMass-Amherst against the Celtics, he said Monday at media day.

“The first thing for me is just get back on the court,” Embiid said of his expectations this season. “It looks like in a couple days I’m going to have the chance to do that.”

Embiid has missed the past two seasons since being drafted third overall because of foot injuries. Even though he is taking his rookie year one step at a time, he has a positive long-term outlook given how healthy he feels. 

“I’m confident that I’m going to have a long, successful career,” he said. “From what it looks like right now, I’m going to have a 20-year career.”

Embiid has grown as a player and a person during his recovery. He noted had he been competing in an 82-game season, he would not have had as much time to dedicate on his development. As a result of the specialized workouts and the hours he has spent in an individual practice format, he has improved his shooting and gained strength and speed. 

“What I was two years ago, I’m not even close to what I am right now,” he said. “My game has gotten so much better ... I’m not the same guy. I’m different.”

Embiid has been following a well-mapped out rehab plan during which he has had to adhere to restrictions, and will continue to do so this season. He admits the restrictions have been frustrating, but he now understands they are being implemented for his best interest long term. The lengthy recovery has forced him to change his outlook on maintaining his health. 

“The main thing I learned about myself is, I could be patient,” Embiid said. “When I was first doing my rehab, going through that, the only thing I thought about was getting back on the court. I would try to get back on the court and play more than I was supposed to. After the doctor [said] you had to heal well and I needed the second surgery, that’s when I told myself be patient and do whatever I can and make sure I listen to what people have to say.”

Head coach Brett Brown wants Embiid to become the “crown jewel” of the defense. Embiid, who stands at a towering 7-foot-2, 275 pounds, is ready to embrace those expectations. He has studied tape of Tim Duncan, Hakeem Olajuwon and Patrick Ewing, among others. Embiid likes the game of Marc Gasol and appreciates how DeAndre Jordan communicates as a big man. 

“I love playing defense,” he said. “I hate when the other team scores.”

Embiid's debut will be the culmination of years of work. Now that the season is approaching, he is eager to count down the days. 

“I’m really excited,” Embiid said. “I’ve gone through a lot and it’s been two years. The fact that I’m healthy now and ready to get back on the court, I just can’t wait.”