Give and Go: Who are the real 76ers?

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Give and Go: Who are the real 76ers?

Each week we'll ask questions about the Sixers to our resident basketball enthusiasts and see what they have to say.

Running the Give and Go this week are CSNPhilly.com reporter John Finger, CSNPhilly.com columnist John Gonzalez and CSN producer Sean Kane. Let's get started:

What's the biggest key for the Sixers on their three-game road trip?

Finger: Aside from winning a game (or two) and getting home in one piece with no injuries, consistency will be important for the Sixers. Give the Sixers credit for competing every game. But from night to night, it's tough to know which team we'll see -- the one that got pounded by the Spurs or the one that beat the Heat, Wizards, Bulls and Rockets.

Gonzalez: Keeping Michael Carter-Williams healthy. The Sixers and their rookie point guard have been a pleasant surprise so far. But we all know the truth: Even if they're somewhere closer to average than awful on the win-loss spectrum, they're still not a good team. Good comes later -- next year and beyond -- if everything goes to plan. MCW shouldn't rush back. Sit and rest a while if that's what's needed. There's plenty of time for him and the Sixers to acquit themselves.

Kane: Playing with the same level of intensity on the road as they do at home. It's easy to compete and overcome fourth-quarter deficits with an enthusiastic home crowd cheering you on, especially for young guys only a year or two removed from college. But will that same effort manifest itself on the road? Time will tell. All three of these games are winnable. The Hawks have been mediocre, the Pelicans have been slow to mesh with all their new parts and the Mavericks have been up and down. I don't expect the Sixers to win all three games. Two out of three would be a huge accomplishment, but a more realistic goal is avoiding an 0-3 road trip.

Are the Sixers closer to the team that lost to the Spurs or beat the Rockets?

Finger:
Is in between the two an answer? The Sixers aren't as bad as the Spurs made them out to be on Monday and they aren't as good as they were in the OT victory over the Rockets. But they are very, very young and young teams pull off the Jekyll-and-Hyde bit frequently during the season.

That's not to diminish the loss or the win. The Sixers were hanging around against San Antonio before the Spurs put the pedal down. Unlike other teams, the Spurs are disciplined enough to keep teams like the Sixers from inching back into the game. Meanwhile, the Rockets got whatever shot they wanted against the Sixers. They took 41 three-pointers, 50 shots in the paint and five mid-range twos. Five! And they lost.

Gonzalez: The Sixers are exactly what they appear to be -- a team that can run and surprise you and beat the Rockets, and a team that can play terribly and get blown out against the Spurs. Depends on the night and the personnel. (It certainly doesn't hurt when a guy like James Harden is out with an injury.) At this point, we have to start considering a real possibility: What if the Sixers aren't awful? What if they're average?

Kane: They are somewhere in between. But over time they'll come to more closely resemble the team that beat the Rockets. If one thing has been made clear through the season's first nine games, it's that the Sixers are going to compete for 48 minutes (or in Wednesday's case: 53 minutes). That trait goes a long way in a league where teams put out varying levels of effort depending on the situation, and coaches like to make sure their stars are well-rested for the playoffs. If you play hard in the NBA, you're going to win some games, regardless of your talent level.

And that's where I tend to differ from the majority. There is talent on the Sixers' roster. Carter-Williams has been a revelation, Thaddeus Young is a consummate professional, Spencer Hawes is a skilled big man and James Anderson and Tony Wroten have proven they are NBA-caliber guards. That brings us to Evan Turner. This is my fourth year as president of the E.T. Fan Club. (It's been a rocky first term no doubt.) But I've long maintained that Turner can be an All-Star if he is put in the right situation. Watching Jrue Holiday dominate the offense, and having Doug Collins criticize his every move wasn't the right situation. We are now seeing what Turner can do when given the freedom to just play basketball and utilize his various talents.

Ben Simmons suffers fractured bone in right foot

Ben Simmons suffers fractured bone in right foot

As the Sixers get two bigs back from injury, another goes down.

First overall pick Ben Simmons suffered a fracture of the fifth metatarsal bone of his right foot on Friday. Simmons rolled his right ankle during the team’s final training camp scrimmage at Stockton University.

Simmons underwent an X-ray and MRI on his right foot and ankle. Sixers head physician Dr. Christopher Dodson and Sixers chief medical officer and co-chief of sports medicine orthopedics at New York's Mount Sinai Medical Center Dr. Jonathan Glashow reviewed the images.

Simmons’ timetable to return is to be determined. The Sixers are considering further medical evaluation and treatment options. 

Landing the No. 1 pick and selecting Simmons was the highlight of the Sixers’ next chapter. They were supposed to be healthy this time around as they entered a new phase following a 10-72 season. 

The news of the fracture adds to years of injury-related setbacks. Nerlens Noel missed his entire rookie season rehabbing from an ACL injury. After undergoing two foot injuries in as many years, the 2014 third overall pick Joel Embiid is slated to make his NBA debut Oct. 4 against the Celtics in preseason action. Jahlil Okafor is also expected to play next Tuesday for the first time since his season-ending knee surgery in March. 

The Sixers drafted Simmons to become a focal point of their system. At 6-foot-10, 250 pounds, he is a point-forward with the potential to change the look of a lineup. During training camp Brown experimented with multiple combinations, including playing Simmons at the point, shooting guard and small forward. 

Brown called the two-three combination of Simmons and Dario Saric “6-10, do-alls” (see story)

Simmons, 20, impressed his teammates during camp. In just four days of practices, it was easy for them to see how Simmons would improve the Sixers. 

“He’s really physical,” Joel Embiid said. “He’s just a big presence. When he pushes the ball, you can feel it. He makes you want to go with him. … He’s so fast and he’s so big.” 

Said Nerlens Noel, “He just plays basketball the right way. When your big man does that, it makes it a lot easier because he is very versatile being a point-forward type. That opens up a lot of things for him to be able to open up for his teammates."

The Sixers will be faced with filling a role they haven’t actually had yet. They had gameplans of how to utilize Simmons, but they were implemented only in training camp. The Sixers have a frontcourt logjam which will allow them to plug in other players at the power forward spot. They also can fill his experimented role on the wings with traditional shooters. But his absence will eliminate versatile lineups in which players are essentially “positionless,” a Warriors-style of play that causes mismatches of size and skills. 

Even though the Sixers have an abundance of bigs, Embiid and Okafor will be monitored for minutes at the start of the season. Throw in Simmons’ injury and this creates opportunities for other frontcourt players such as Richaun Holmes and Elton Brand. With Simmons absence, there also could be more minutes for Saric to play his natural position at power forward. 

Simmons wasn’t letting himself get too far ahead as he entered his first NBA season. He has been taking each day one at a time with an excitement of the newness of his rookie year.

“I think it’s still surreal for me,” Simmons said on Media Day. “I think it’ll finally hit me once I step on the court matched up against OKC the first game.”

Now it remains to be seen when Simmons will play his first game. 

Sixers Injury Update: Simmons rolls ankle, taken for precautionary imaging

Sixers Injury Update: Simmons rolls ankle, taken for precautionary imaging

GALLOWAY, N.J. -- Ben Simmons rolled his right ankle during a team scrimmage on the final day of training camp. He was taken for precautionary imaging. The results have not yet been completed.

Jerryd Bayless did not scrimmage because of a sore left wrist, which the team continues to monitor. He sat out of Thursday's scrimmage for the same reason.

Jahlil Okafor participated in Friday's scrimmage in accordance to his load management. The Sixers are being cautious with players as they return from injury. Okafor underwent right knee surgery last season.