Give and Go: Who do you want taking final shot?

Give and Go: Who do you want taking final shot?
January 18, 2014, 12:00 pm

Each week, we'll ask questions about the Sixers to our resident basketball analysts and see what they have to say.

Running the Give and Go this week are CSNPhilly.com columnist John Gonzalez, CSNPhilly.com reporter John Finger and CSN anchor/reporter Marshall Harris.

Which Sixer would you want to take a last-second shot?

Gonzalez
You saw it the other night: Thad Young. He hit the game-winner against the Bobcats after not making a three-pointer in the game until that moment. He's hitting a career-best percentage from long-range this season, and he still has the ability to put the ball on the floor and drive to the basket or post up in the paint and get a shot from there. Spencer Hawes might be a better shooter, and Evan Turner might be a better driver, but Young has both skill sets and is better overall.

Finger
Shoot it? That's a tough one. However, the player I want with the ball is Michael Carter-Williams. Obviously, the point guard can set up guys for a shot, or drive to the hoop, create a shot for himself or get fouled. MCW simply gives the team the best chance to get a bucket. Better yet, in the clutch when the game is within five points in the final three minutes of a quarter, Carter-Williams has committed just two turnovers in nine games. He also is shooting 85.7 percent from the foul line in those situations. So, yes, I'm going with MCW.

Harris
It’s not even about which Sixer takes the last shot, but rather which Sixer has the ball in his hands in the waning seconds with the game on the line. Think Michael Jordan giving it up to John Paxson or Steve Kerr for the game-winner. I want Carter-Williams to be that guy. As we saw when they beat the Bobcats, Carter-Williams has the best court vision on the floor and can also get into the lane with ease to get his own shot off in the paint. No, his jumper isn’t scaring anybody, but that should come. I just think, even as a rookie, his approach is more even keel than to think -- as others might -- that he has to do it himself with no help.