Give and Go: Who suffered most in Sixers' skid?

Give and Go: Who suffered most in Sixers' skid?

Brown: 'I've learned the city does have patience'

March 30, 2014, 2:00 pm
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Each week, we'll ask questions about the Sixers to our resident basketball analysts and see what they have to say.

Running the Give and Go this week are CSNPhilly.com columnist John Gonzalez, CSNPhilly.com producer/reporter John Finger and CSNPhilly.com producer/reporter Matt Haughton

Who suffered the most during the Sixers' losing skid: Players, Brett Brown or fans?

Gonzalez
Yes. Choice D. All of the above. When a team ties the NBA record for losing, there's plenty of suffering to go around. Many of the players on the roster are probably thankful to have NBA jobs, but that might not fully mitigate the sting associated with getting your basketball teeth kicked in on television each night.

Brown signed up for this, but he couldn't have known the tank effort would be historic.

As for the fans, they've been asked to hang in there and wait for a brighter tomorrow. And tomorrow will be brighter. It must. Because, comparatively speaking, that's the only possibility.

Finger
The players come and go. In fact, the there will be very few players that were part of this historical season back next year. Michael Carter-Williams and Thad Young will return. So will Tony Wroten. Nerlens Noel also will be ready to play, but the streak has nothing to do with him.

This is all on Sam Hinkie. He's the architect. So as far as the suffering goes, it gets piled on Brown. It's his name that will be tagged next to the records and he had very little to do with putting together the roster.

Sure, Brown gets it. He understands the plan and what the organization is trying to do. But in 50 years when everyone has forgotten about what happened in 2013-14, Brown will still be the coach of a team that matched the NBA record for losses in a row. It doesn't seem fair to Brown or his legacy.

Haughton
Let's be clear: All parties involved have suffered to an extent. But with a contingent of fans rooting for a better spot in the draft lottery and Brown continuously saying this is what he signed up for, the players took the skid the hardest.

After all, the players were the ones on the court taking those bumps and bruises while suffering one loss after another. They knew that going into each game they would be at a disadvantage talent-wise but still had to put forth maximum effort and catch some breaks just to be competitive.

Tanking or not, when people look back on that 26-game skid years from now, all the talk will be about the players on this season's team and how they let such a thing happen.