Jerry Stackhouse's next goal: Help the NBPA

040913_jerry-stackhouse.jpg

Jerry Stackhouse's next goal: Help the NBPA

Jerry Stackhouse is looking ahead.

Life without playing basketball has arrived for the one-time Sixer, and he already knows what that life will be: time spent securing the future for current and former NBA players.

The Brooklyn Nets swingman mentioned recently that he would likely retire after this season to focus more on his role as first vice president with the troubled NBA Players Association.

Stackhouse made his goal clear. He wants changes. He wants communication. He wants full disclosure. He wants to be informed so that the next time the players come face to face with NBA owners to discuss a new collective bargaining agreement, the players will be better equipped.

Why does he feel this way? Simple: He sat back and watched as players went clueless as to what officials inside the NBAPA were doing. The back door dealings. The lack of communication. The lack of information. The misleading.

"I've always been in tune with the union," Stackhouse told CSNPhilly.com last month when the Nets visited the Sixers. "But I wasn't in tune with some of their ways of dealing with things in the past."

Some of those dealings allegedly led to the ousting of executive director Billy Hunter, who was fired unanimously by the NBA player representatives during All-Star Weekend in February.

Stackhouse wouldn't place any blame on Hunter but agreed a change was needed.

"We can easily sit here and point the finger at the executive committee that we voted on and say, 'They didn't do this or they didn't do that.' But as a whole, as a general body, our interest wasn't enough until [there] was a lockout," he said.

With Hunter relieved of his duties, players elected a new executive committee, which includes Stackhouse, former Sixers Andre Iguodala and Willie Green, James Jones, Roger Mason Jr., Chris Paul and Stephen Curry.

"The guys thought that I would be a pretty good fit to help take things in a different direction," Stackhouse said. "I was nominated and I accepted it.

"I take a lot of pride in making some decisions that can help us over these next 15 to 20 years. I think we've made a lot of mistakes over the last 10 to 15 years. We just didn't take enough interest as a body."

The 38-year-old Stackhouse mentioned the 2011 NBA lockout as the turning point. He said that lockout wasn't really a lockout because the season was not lost. Players didn't miss paychecks, but the deal, he feels, could have been better.

"Our strategy, at the particular time, wasn't the best that it could be," Stackhouse said. "We're seeing some of the results of that now, but that's why we're trying to correct it going forward. What's happened has happened, but hopefully the next time we come to the bargaining table we'll come with a little more understanding of not only what's for the best interest of the players, but the best interest of the game."

For that to happen, Stackhouse had to come to an understanding with union president Derek Fisher. Days before Hunter was outed, Stackhouse told The Detroit News, that Fisher "has to go too."

"I just think there wasn't enough, in my mind, disclosure of ideas and thoughts with the player reps, which in turn could try and get some feedback from the general body," Stackhouse said. "That's important to me -- not enough communication.

"Some of those things needed to be shared and we may not have had to go down that track."

The two have since spoken.

"I respect his decisions now that we've talked," Stackhouse said, "but at the same time I feel I probably would've handle things a little differently. And being in the position that I am now, I'll see to it [that] things will be handled differently than they were handled before."

Stackhouse said he intends to focus on retired players more than the superstars and younger players. In his mind, the LeBron Jameses, Kobe Bryants and Kevin Durants of the league will always be taken care of. The younger players, well, "They have their whole future ahead of them."

"It's a cultural shock stepping back into society after playing this game," he said. "I think we want to put some mechanisms in place to be able to educate guys, once they leave the league, how to kind of integrate themselves back into society. Some of the former players who are down or in some tough situations -- put in some programs to try and help them."

Best of NBA: Rockets overcome Russell Westbrook's 7th straight triple-double

Best of NBA: Rockets overcome Russell Westbrook's 7th straight triple-double

OKLAHOMA CITY -- James Harden scored 21 points, and the Houston Rockets overcame Russell Westbrook's seventh consecutive triple-double to beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 102-99 on Friday night.

Harden also had 12 assists and nine rebounds to help the Rockets win their fifth straight. Houston withstood Harden's 6-for-23 shooting effort.

Westbrook finished with 27 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists. He has the longest triple-double streak since Michael Jordan had seven straight in 1989. The most in a row is nine by Philadelphia's Wilt Chamberlain in March 1968.

It was Westbrook's 12th triple-double this season and the 49th of his career. He is the NBA's active leader in the category and ranks sixth all-time.

The Thunder had won the previous six games during Westbrook's triple-double binge (see full story).

James moves into 9th on scoring list as Cavs top Heat
CLEVELAND -- LeBron James scored 27 points to move into ninth place on the NBA scoring list, and the Cleveland Cavaliers defeated the Miami Heat 114-84 on Friday night.

James passed Elvin Hayes on a driving layup with 6:58 remaining and has 27,315 career points. The four-time MVP was removed about a minute later and received a loud ovation from the Cleveland crowd.

Kevin Love, a game-time decision because of back spasms, scored a team-high 28 points and had 15 rebounds for the Cavaliers. He missed the morning shootaround but was in the lineup after warming up on the court about an hour before tip-off.

Kyrie Irving added 23 points for the Cavs, who have won three straight after losing three in a row.

Derrick Williams scored 17 points to lead the short-handed Heat, who have lost four straight (see full story). 

Schroder has career-high 33, Hawks rally past Bucks
MILWAUKEE -- Dennis Schroder scored a career-high 33 points and the Atlanta Hawks rallied from 20 down in the second half to defeat the Milwaukee Bucks 114-110 on Friday night.

Paul Millsap had 23 points and 14 rebounds for Atlanta. Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 18.

The Hawks, who ended a seven-game losing streak Wednesday with a win over Miami, trailed by 20 at halftime. A 40-point third quarter put them back in the game.

Jabari Parker scored 27 for Milwaukee. Giannis Antetokounmpo, in foul trouble throughout the game, had 14.

Atlanta pulled ahead 105-103 on Kyle Korver's jumper with 3:15 remaining, giving the Hawks their first lead since early in the game (see full story). 

Joel Embiid 'shoots the ball with the touch of like Steph Curry'

Joel Embiid 'shoots the ball with the touch of like Steph Curry'

NEW ORLEANS -- Of all the players Joel Embiid could be compared to, a similarity between a 7-foot-2, 270-something-pound center and a 6-foot-3, 190-pound point guard wouldn’t seem like a match.

That’s exactly what Pelicans head coach Alvin Gentry sees, however, when looking at Embiid and reigning MVP Steph Curry.

“He’s different than anybody that’s been in this league in a long, long time,” Gentry said Thursday before the Sixers win over the Pelicans. “He’s a tremendous talent, he really is. I’ve never seen a guy that size, and with that kind of strength, that’s got such a soft touch. He shoots the ball with the touch of like Steph Curry. It’s so soft when it leaves his hand.”

Curry is shooting 48.9 percent from the field and 40.1 percent from three. Embiid is 45.8 percent from the floor is 44.2 percent from long range.

Embiid flashed a big smile and paused to react when hearing of Gentry’s praise. He had been feeling hard on himself after going 0 for 5 beyond the arc against the Pelicans (see story).

“Steph is probably one of the best shooters in the league right now," Embiid said. "So that compliment means a lot."