Lavoy Allen on his preseason: 'Not too good'

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Lavoy Allen on his preseason: 'Not too good'

Lavoy Allen is averaging four rebounds in 17 minutes per game in the preseason. Spencer Hawes (6.8), Evan Turner (6.5) and Hollis Thompson (5.3) are all averaging more boards than the 6-foot-9 forward/center.

Allen hurt his knee early in training camp, but insists he is close to 100 percent healthy. The third-year veteran admitted his play has not been up to par.

“Not too good,” Allen said when asked to evaluate his play thus far in the preseason. “I could improve. I am trying to get my conditioning back. I sat out for awhile, it is more a conditioning thing than the knee.”

Allen started 37 games in his second NBA season, averaging 5.8 points and five rebounds in 21.1 minutes a night.

He won’t start for Brett Brown, but Allen could certainly contribute on a team that can use his experience and ability to rebound.

The problem is the former Temple product just hasn’t delivered.

“I am trying to help him be put in positions where he can do well,” Brown said. “I am trying to help him understand what we need from him defensively. It is really the same story I tell all of our guys, we have a long way to go defensively.”

The Sixers have two preseason games remaining. They face the Cavaliers in Columbus, Ohio on Oct. 21 and then host the Timberwolves on Oct. 23 at the Wells Fargo Center.

Report: Sixers' Ben Simmons will undergo surgery next week for foot injury

Report: Sixers' Ben Simmons will undergo surgery next week for foot injury

Ben Simmons will reportedly need surgery and the theory that his recent weight gain caused his injury looks to be false.

The Sixers believe Simmons suffered an "acute injury" not related to him adding over 30 pounds of muscle. The rookie will undergo surgery next week, according to ESPN's Marc Stein

Simmons played at LSU at 217 pounds and was up to 238 before the draft. On media day, he said he was up to 250.

The news of surgery is a little disappointing. As a guest on CSNPhilly's SportsNet Central, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mark Schwartz, who is not treating Simmons, gave some insight into what a fracture to the fifth metatarsal could mean. Surgery could mean a lengthy recovery, according to Schwartz. If it is the dreaded Jones fracture, it'll be tough to know Simmons' timetable.

"The prognosis is still good, but we know that Kevin Durant had a Jones fracture and he was out for an entire season because of it not healing," Schwartz said. "But the prognosis is good, however, the question is whether it's going to require surgery or not."

Per Stein, Simmons requires surgery. Schwartz said that surgery would involve inserting a screw to repair the fracture.

With how the Sixers have handled their prospects in the past and the way they've been cautious with the likes of second-year player Jahlil Okafor, they'll likely be conservative when assessing Simmons' possible return.

Orthopedist on Sixers' Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

Orthopedist on Sixers' Ben Simmons' injury: 'The prognosis is good'

On Friday, Sixers fans got some bad news when the team revealed that No. 1 overall pick Ben Simmons fractured the fifth metatarsal in his right foot.

The Sixers didn't give a timetable for his return, saying that they were reviewing treatment options for the 6-foot-10 point-forward.

As a guest on CSNPhilly's Sportsnet Central, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Mark Schwartz gave a little insight into Simmons' injury. Schwartz is not treating Simmons, but has dealt with similar injuries. Schwartz believes the prognosis is good for the Sixers' rookie.

"The big question is where the exact location of this fracture is," Schwartz said. "That will dictate the prognosis and the treatment. If it's at the base of the fifth metatarsal, it's usually a non-surgical treatment. It's usually a cast/boot for six to eight weeks and return to play somewhere around eight weeks."

That would be great news considering Sixers fans didn't get to see Nerlens Noel the year he was drafted and are still awaiting the debut of 2014 draft pick Joel Embiid. 

Schwartz warns that the injury could be something known as a Jones fracture, which would likely require surgery and the recovery could be three to four months. The prognosis would still be good, according to Schwartz, but other NBA players have had lengthy recoveries with a similar injury.

"The prognosis is still good, but we know that Kevin Durant had a Jones fracture and he was out for an entire season because of it not healing," Schwartz said. "But the prognosis is good, however, the question is whether it's going to require surgery or not."

For more from Schwartz on Simmons' injury and possible timetable, check out the video above.