Motivation not lacking for Sixers' Carter-Williams

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Motivation not lacking for Sixers' Carter-Williams

Sam Hinkie made quite a splash in his first draft calling the shots for the 76ers. By trading the team’s All-Star and captain in Jrue Holiday, the Sixers got two lottery picks in the 2013 draft and received New Orleans’ first-round pick for the 2014 draft, a league source confirmed (see story).

But when it came to the original, No. 11 overall pick, Hinkie played it straight.

“We were pleasantly surprised that Michael Carter-Williams fell to us,” Hinkie said. “We looked at many options to move up to get him and he fell to us at 11 and we were relieved.”

That’s where the Sixers took Carter-Williams, a guard out of Syracuse University and St. Andrews High School in Barrington, R.I. At 6-foot-6 and 185 pounds, Carter-Williams averaged just 8.2 points per game in his two years at Syracuse, but set the school record with 111 steals last season.

Defense and passing is Carter-Williams’ forte. He said he sees himself strictly as a point guard in the NBA and with Holiday traded to New Orleans, Carter-Williams will be the only point guard on the roster.

“I’m strictly a one,” Carter-Williams said. “That’s my natural position.”

Interestingly, Carter-Williams and Nerlens Noel, the No. 6 overall pick the Sixers acquired for Holiday, were AAU teammates in 10th and 11th grade in Massachusetts. Carter-Williams said he and Noel were talking about living next door to one another in Philadelphia.

“We grew up together and we’re really good friends,” Carter-Williams said. “I just got here and he was like, ‘Yo, I can’t believe we’re going to be playing together.’ We were talking about living next door to each other. We’re excited.”

The trade for Noel can’t be announced until it receives NBA approval.

The glaring weakness in Carter-Williams’ game is his shooting. As a freshman, Carter-Williams shot just 7 for 18 from three-point range and followed that up with 35 for 120 (29.2 percent) during his last year at Syracuse.

Carter-Williams said he got in a shooting slump that he couldn’t shake.

“I’ve been working on that and my shot was good in the workouts and I switched some little things and it’s been fine,” Carter-Williams said.

“I think I got caught up in passing the ball and I wasn’t as aggressive as I should have been. I got into a slump and I couldn’t get out of it, but I’ve learned how to fix things.”

Based on all Carter-Williams has been through the past season, fixing a shot from the perimeter is the easy part. A fire destroyed his family’s home last March while Carter-Williams was playing in the NCAA tournament. 

Reportedly, the fire also destroyed a player evaluation that the guard kept above his desk that read Carter-Williams wasn’t good enough to play at a school like Syracuse.

The NBA? Forget it.

“He’s wonderfully competitive,” Hinkie said of the No. 11 pick.

When it comes to motivation, Carter-Williams has it covered.

“I think my game is ready and I think the mental part of it is ready,” Carter-Williams said. “I’ve been in a lot of situations and I’ve been in situations where I’ve been able to succeed, and I think I’m ready for the NBA right now.”

Sixers, Magic get glimpse into future with young talent on full display

Sixers, Magic get glimpse into future with young talent on full display

The Sixers' 105-88 loss to the Magic on Friday was not the game to watch for those looking for competitive basketball, as the Magic needed just three quarters to put the game out of reach (see Instant Replay).

What the game did have was some of the NBA’s top young talent.

Friday night featured six first-round picks from the 2014 NBA draft. Joel Embiid (No. 3), Aaron Gordon (No. 4), Nik Stauskas (No. 8), Elfrid Payton (No. 10) and Dario Saric (No. 12) were all lottery selections in 2014.

Add in Sixers center Jahlil Okafor and Magic guard Mario Hezonja, who were both top-five picks in 2015, and that’s seven top-12 picks from the last three draft classes, not even counting the injured Ben Simmons.

“Basketball’s a small world, you grow up playing these guys," Gordon said of the Sixers. "Those guys are talented. They have a young group of guys that are going to get better and better each time they play.”

Though he played only 27 minutes, Embiid finished the game with 25 points and 10 rebounds to go along with four assists for the Sixers (see story). Okafor had a double-double of his own, adding 16 points and 13 rebounds.

Gordon, who is averaging 9.9 points and 4.5 rebounds per game, led the Magic with 20 points and also added two rebounds.

“He did pretty good,” Embiid said of Gordon. “He shot the ball pretty well tonight.”

The other four lottery selections struggled a bit. Payton played 24 minutes and finished with two points and four assists, while Hezonja missed both of his shot attempts in just three minutes of playing time.

Stauskas went scoreless, going 0 for 6 from the floor, finishing with five assists and three turnovers, while Saric went 1 for 5 from the field and turned the ball over twice

“It’s just about being patient, really,” Stauskas said. “We know our time will come eventually. It’s just about being patient and continuing to work hard, whether it’s next year or the year after, eventually things are going to click and this team is going to become a legit playoff team in the East, it’s just a matter of time before it happens.”

Even with a plethora of top-round talent, the Magic have struggled over the past two seasons, much like the Sixers. Orlando hadn't won more than 25 games in a season since 2012-13 before going 35-47 last year.

Despite the abundance of talent, both teams are waiting for their players to develop. Both the Sixers and Magic entered Friday’s game among the bottom four teams in the Eastern Conference. If their draft choices pan out, it wouldn't be surprising to see the two teams closer to the top of the conference and right in the thick of the playoff race in a few years. 

“Eventually they’re going to get there,” Magic center Bismack Biyombo said of the Sixers. “Like all young teams, you go through struggles before you face success. That’s just how life is. They have to learn the hard way. We’ve all been through the process like that but you always have to stay patient and see a great future ahead. Obviously they have a lot of talented kids that sooner or later, they’ll know more about the league and establish themselves.”

Despite blowout loss, Sixers see potential in Joel Embiid, Jahlil Okafor playing together

Despite blowout loss, Sixers see potential in Joel Embiid, Jahlil Okafor playing together

BOX SCORE

Brett Brown was ready to do it Wednesday night. The matchup against the Kings presented an opportunity to experiment with playing Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor together. That pairing had to wait two days, though, after the Kings game was postponed

On Friday, Embiid and Okafor shared the court for just under 13 minutes in the Sixers' 105-88 loss to the Magic (see Instant Replay), who also rolled out a duo of bigs in Bismack Biyombo and Nikola Vucevic. 

“I thought we had our moments,” Embiid said. “We shared the ball, we made shots. Obviously we need to play more together and learn how to play with each other.”

Embiid and Okafor first played together for 5:29 in the second quarter. They scored all of the Sixers' 12 points during that time, including a pair of threes by Embiid. They also combined for five boards. The Sixers outscored the Magic, 12-9, with the bigs in together.

The benefits of the floor spacing was apparent. Oftentimes in the game, Okafor could be seen open at the basket with a hand up for the ball while Embiid was also getting looks from long range. 

“I liked our spacing, I liked the high-low stuff we were doing,” Brown said. “I think when you post Joel, that Jahlil is going to play sort of hide-and-seek on the other side of the floor, and work that low zone, and become — I hope — a potent offensive rebounder. When you post Jahlil, Joel has the ability to space to three.”

Brown turned to Embiid and Okafor again in the fourth. At that point, the Magic had a 23-point lead. Their next 7:25 together was a chance to give them a long run in live game action. They combined for another 12 points and four rebounds. All of their buckets were layups, dunks or free throws. Both teams scored 19 points with Embiid and Okafor in that segment.

Both Embiid and Okafor finished the game with double-doubles: 25 points, 10 rebounds and four assists for Embiid; 16 points, 13 rebounds and two blocks for Okafor. 

“I thought they played well together,” Vucevic said. “I thought it was tough to guard them because they’re both really good offensively.”

Okafor credited his friendship with Embiid, which dates back to high school, as a key to coexisting well on the court. Both emphasized their off-the-court relationship would help them in a game situation. 

“I think the communication piece went really well,” Okafor said. “He was talking to me, I was talking to him.”

Scoring and communication always seemed to be the easier parts of the pairing to tackle. Defense, though, was the challenge given that one of the centers would have to guard the four spot. Okafor noted their transition D as an area that needs improvement.

“We’re both used to going right to the rim,” Okafor said. “I think I had a couple easy buckets. That’s something we’ll be able to fix.” 

Brown had based his decision of when to play Embiid and Okafor together on the matchups. While the two could boast their own edge on the offensive end, Brown didn’t want to play them in a scenario in which they’d be at a huge defensive disadvantage. 

“It’s not offense to me, it’s defense. That’s the thing that is most challenging,” Brown said. “We want to play fast. We want to put points on the board. You don’t want to play in the 80s. You don’t want to do that, that’s not our sport anymore. So you want to make sure that you're capable of guarding the opposition.”

Vucevic noticed the challenge from an opposing perspective. He understands the necessary changes since playing alongside Biyombo.  

“It takes time for them to get adjusted, especially for the guy that will be playing the four defensively,” Vucevic said. “They’re not used to that because they always back down to the paint guarding the fives. It’s a different look. They have to work on it, communicate, and I think they’ll be fine.” 

On a night with few highlights in a 17-point blowout loss, Brown was able to take away a positive from this anticipated duo.

"I thought Jahlil and Joel did a really good job," he said.