NBA Notes: Tyson Chandler out about a week

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NBA Notes: Tyson Chandler out about a week

NEW YORK -- The New York Knicks say All-Star center Tyson Chandler is expected to miss about a week and Kurt Thomas will be sidelined for at least two as injuries continue to plague their frontcourt.

Chandler had an MRI exam of his spine Tuesday that revealed a bulging disc. An exam of Thomas' right foot revealed an acute stress reaction surrounding a chronic stress fracture. The team says he could miss as much as four weeks, potentially knocking him out for the rest of the regular season.

Carmelo Anthony has missed three straight games after having fluid drained from the back of his right knee. Key reserves Amare Stoudemire (knee) and Rasheed Wallace (foot) have already been lost to surgery for at least the rest of the regular season.

Waiters out at least a week
CLEVELAND -- Cavaliers rookie guard Dion Waiters will miss at least one week with a sore left knee and may need surgery.

The Cavs said an MRI taken Tuesday revealed a loose fragment in Waiters' left knee. He injured his knee in the first half of Monday's home loss to Indiana and did not return.

He will rest and have treatment over the next week, and the Cavs said it's possible the No. 4 overall pick in last year's draft may need an arthroscopic procedure.

The loss of Waiters is another blow to the Cavs, who are already missing All-Star guard Kyrie Irving and forward Anderson Varejao with injuries.

On Wednesday, the Cavs host the Miami Heat, who will attempt to extend their winning streak to 24.

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St. Joe's forward Isaiah Miles earns summer league invite from Dallas Maverick

St. Joe's forward Isaiah Miles earns summer league invite from Dallas Maverick

Undrafted St. Joe's forward Isaiah Miles will play for the Dallas Mavericks summer league team in Las Vegas, according to a source. 

Miles averaged 18.1 points, 8.1 rebounds and 1.0 blocks last season as a senior. He shot 52.3 percent from the field and 88.8 percent from the line, making 142 of 160 attempts. Miles was named the 2015-16 Most Improved Player for the Atlantic 10 and Big 5. 

Miles worked out for the Sixers during the draft process. Last month he left the pre-draft combine in Chicago to attend his graduation in Philadelphia, and then returned to the Windy City after the ceremony. He earned a bachelor's in criminal justice. 

"Getting a degree, at the end of the day, is the most important thing," Miles said after his Sixers' workout. "I just wanted to do it for my mom. Walking across the stage and seeing the smile on her face was huge."

Miles' college teammate DeAndre Bembry was drafted 21st by the Hawks on Thursday. 

Sixers sign Long
Lousiana-Layfayette big man Shawn Long has signed a deal with the Sixers. The 6-foot-9, 245 pound big man played all four years for the Ragin' Cajuns and was the teammate of former Sixers lottery pick Elfrid Payton (Payton was traded shortly after to the Magic for the rights to Dario Saric).

Long, the Sun Belt Player of the Year last season, worked out for the Sixers back in May and impressed. During his college career, Long averaged 17.3 points, 10.7 rebounds and 2 blocks per game.

Sixers have hurdles to clear with draft picks before summer league

Sixers have hurdles to clear with draft picks before summer league

Summer league action begins on July 4 and the Sixers are working through constructing their roster for both Utah and Las Vegas. 

The Sixers expect first overall pick Ben Simmons to participate, but formalities have to be taken care of first. First-round picks cannot sign their NBA contract until July 1. After the paperwork is finalized, he can take the court for his new team.

“We just need to work out all the details and try to get that all taken care of,” president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said Friday. “Once that is addressed and discussed and taken care of, there shouldn’t be anything that would hold that process up. We’ll get the ink on paper as soon as possible. I think it’ll be a clear path at that point.”

Simmons deferred to his agent, Rich Paul, when asked about his participation. 

“You would like for a guy to step in there, but obviously there are some things that, me personally, I’m going to have to protect him with,” Paul said. “If everything is good, then we look forward to it. Until then, we’ll see what happens.” 

Paul added, “I think we’ll be OK, but you just never know.”

The Sixers will compete in summer leagues in both Utah and Las Vegas. They will begin practicing in Utah on July 1 and play games July 4-7. The team will then travel to Las Vegas for the Samsung NBA Summer League, where their first game is July 9 against the Los Angeles Lakers and No. 2 pick Brandon Ingram. The summer league in Las Vegas is tournament-style, with the championship game on July 18. 

There is more work involved for the Sixers’ 24th pick, Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot, because of his international contract with Mega Leks in Serbia. 

“I believe Luwawu is subject to playing,” Colangelo said. “The only thing that would stop him from being available and able to sign a contract is that process of the three-party agreement, the buyout and the FIBA clearance before he can sign a contract.”

Furkan Korkmaz, the 26th overall pick, is not expected to play as he is participating with the Turkish national team. 

“I would just put that as a no, highly unlikely because of the circumstances,” Colangelo said. 

Dario Saric has until July 17 to notify his team in Turkey if he will play for them next season or join the Sixers. Even if Saric makes his decision during the summer league period, Colangelo said it would be “highly or not likely” that he participates because he recently completed his season. There is no new update on Saric’s impending decision. 

The Sixers will round out their summer league rosters with current players and free-agent signings. T.J. McConnell, Richaun Holmes and Christian Wood are expected to play. James Webb III, who participated in a pre-draft workout for the Sixers, signed a deal with the team following the draft and is expected to participate in summer league (see story)

'The Process' still reigns in Bryan Colangelo's first Sixers draft

'The Process' still reigns in Bryan Colangelo's first Sixers draft

If you didn’t know who was saying the words, if you simply closed your eyes and listened — absent any inflection or accent that might give away the speaker’s identity — the remarks would have sounded awfully consistent with other statements given in similar situations over the last few years. The words “patience” and “process” were employed, which is standard stuff considering the organization. And yet it was a bit jarring, because the man who uttered all those things this time around is decidedly different than the man who preceded him.

When the first round of the 2016 NBA draft was finished, Bryan Colangelo addressed the media assembly at PCOM. The Sixers took Ben Simmons with the first overall pick, as expected. But despite ceaseless reports and rumors, they did not unload Nerlens Noel or Jahlil Okafor to move back into the lottery, nor did they jettison the 24th or 26th picks. Those decisions were somewhat less expected. What followed was a rather remarkable explanation given the organization’s open desire to advance the rebuild and regain relevance in the league (or some semblance of it).

“This is a work in progress that will continue throughout the summer,” Colangelo said. “We have free agency on the horizon. There were numerous trade scenarios that we looked at. We didn’t feel like any of those trade scenarios would put us in a position where we want to be moving forward. So we took a patient approach. We passed on a few opportunities where we could have reached. We decided that, whether it was retaining assets, particularly future assets, future picks, we still feel like this was the right process to follow.”

Draft night could have gone sideways for the Sixers, and fast. An initial report had the Sixers offering Noel, Robert Covington and the 24th and 26th picks to the Celtics for the third pick, ostensibly so they could annex Kris Dunn. A subsequent report had the Sixers offering the same package to the Timberwolves for the fifth pick, ostensibly so they could annex Kris Dunn. None of it came to fruition, and afterward Colangelo called the trade rumors false and insisted that those rumors didn’t come from the Sixers. You can believe that or dismiss it as post-draft propaganda and damage control. Who leaked what for which purposes matters less than the ultimate outcome — the fact the Sixers, under new management, chose to keep building rather than pressing the detonation plunger on their still on-going construction project.

Whether the Sixers stay committed to the slow-and-steady, asset-accumulation approach is still very much in doubt. As everyone knows, and as Colangelo admitted, they have a clogged frontcourt that needs to be addressed. That’s tricky stuff. But while we wait to see how Colangelo solves that problem, he should be commended for not simply taking a sledgehammer to the issue. That’s what the Noel/Covington/24/26 deal would have been: a big blow to a situation that requires a more delicate solution. The Sixers must move either Noel or Okafor in time, but as Colangelo rightly pointed out, they shouldn’t do it just for the sake of it. Better to keep everyone in house, awkward fit and all, and retain valuable assets until a more useful resolution presents itself.

Beyond that, the Sixers made two fascinating picks at the end of the first round, taking French wing Timothe Luwawu 24th and Turkish guard Furkan Korkmaz 26th. Both guys are the kinds of young, raw players with future potential that might have been favored by the previous administration (and both got rave reviews from the Trust the Process/Rights to Ricky Sanchez crowd). It’s uncertain whether their respective buyouts will permit them to play for the Sixers this coming season or whether one or both will be stamped with draft-and-stash status. Either way, they were smart picks with upside that make sense for a team that wants to add as much talent as possible while avoiding moves that would rush the roster back to the NBA’s dreaded mediocre middle.

As Colangelo said, the roster is far from set. The Sixers have lots of decisions still to make. It’s possible they scrap the patience and process approach in the coming weeks/months and overreach in an attempt to supercharge the rebuild. But for now, what they did on draft night gets full marks. They resisted the urge to do something for the sake of it and at the expense of the future. That’s encouraging.