Sixers don't want leaky defense to impact offense

Sixers don't want leaky defense to impact offense

Solutions for the Sixers' lack of depth

January 14, 2014, 9:00 am
Share This Post

Michael Carter-Williams took just six shots in the Sixers' loss to the Knicks on Saturday. (USA Today Images)

The Sixers continue to allow the most points in the NBA at an astronomical 110.9 per game.

The problem during their current four-game losing streak has been that their poor defense has impacted the other end of the court as well. The Sixers have failed to reach 100 points in three of those four defeats.

"When we have good ball movement I think it is contagious and we play better defense," Michael Carter-Williams said. "The first quarter I thought we did a great job moving the ball but, in that second quarter it got stagnant and we didn't get as many stops. We are better when we share the ball."

Carter-Williams was referring to the Sixers' 102-92 loss to the Knicks on Saturday in which they built a 28-20 lead after one quarter and then produced just 12 points in the second quarter while allowing 32.

After resting Sunday, the Sixers got back to work Monday at PCOM. Brett Brown's message to the team was pretty clear: Defense, defense and more defense.

"We have young guys who can get through it. They need to get through it and get some level of toughness," Brown said. "We need to play better defense. We can say all this stuff but we have to play better defense. It stops and starts there and it always will."

Carter-Williams is one of those young guys Brown was talking about. The leading Rookie of the Year candidate had 11 points, seven rebounds and seven assists in the Sixers' loss to the Knicks. However, MCW only took six shots in the game, a far cry from the 15.5 attempts he averages a night.

"Look at how many shots Michael got, six, and two of them were not good and one was an airball," Brown said. "They want to please, they want to do the right thing and they are trying. I hope I am giving them good advice.

"I know it is a team game. I know they must share the ball, but it can’t get misconstrued. It is always born out of attack. You have to attack and feel good about yourself. You have to force the defense and then kick it."

There's a delicate balance between trusting your teammates and trying to do things on your own that young players must learn. The Sixers do in fact share the ball quite well. They average 22.9 assists per game, which ranks ninth in the NBA. However, they still have moments when they fall behind and they take turns trying to dent the deficit with one-on-one play.

Carter-Williams knows the Sixers' ability to consistently swing the ball starts with him and the point guard believes he is getting closer to making that happen.

"I think I have become a better leader out there," Carter-Williams said. "I think I am pretty consistent at the defensive end and I am just trying to figure things out on offense and adjust because defenses are starting to change, so I am working on that."

1h
1h
16h