Sixers player evaluation: Jason Richardson

Sixers player evaluation: Jason Richardson

April 29, 2013, 9:00 am
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Jason Richardson

Position: Guard

Status:
Signed through 2014-15 for $12.8 million

Signature game of 2012-13
As part of the trade that brought Andrew Bynum to the Sixers, Jason Richardson’s biggest contribution was veteran leadership and experience. And then every once in a while, the savvy guard showed why he is 13th all-time in three-point shooting.

In a 99-93 victory over the Utah Jazz at the Wells Fargo Center on Nov. 16, Richardson scored 20 points on 7-for-12 shooting and 5-for-7 from three-point range. He also grabbed eight rebounds and a pair of steals in 36 minutes.

Richardson made at least three three-pointers in seven games and topped 20 points four times.

Richardson in 2012-13
It was a rough season for the 13-year veteran, one filled with injuries, shooting slumps and then surgery. Actually, the trouble started early for Richardson and seemingly never subsided.

Minutes into the second game of the season at Madison Square Garden, Richardson stepped on a courtside cameraman and sprained his ankle. A few weeks later, Richardson sprained the ankle again and missed more action.

When he got back, he struggled with his shooting. Though he performed well during the early part of the season, Richardson made just 27.4 percent (17 for 62) of his three-pointers in December. That percentage dipped to 23.5 percent (8 for 34) in January before Richardson was lost for the year with torn cartilage behind his knee.

Prospectus
Richardson underwent surgery in February in which cartilage was grafted to his knee. He is expected to miss 9-12 months in order to recover, but at age 32, Richardson’s road back will be arduous.

“I would have tried to play, but if I just got it cleaned or scoped to get the loose cartilage out, because of the size of the hole, it would have just kept on grinding down, and next thing you know it would have been bone on bone,” Richardson said, before having surgery in February. “I have too much life to live after basketball. I have kids I want to be able to play with and stuff like that. I didn’t want to take that chance of getting it cleaned and end up being bone on bone.”

On Jason Richardson …
“I don't want J-Rich's career to end being a salary cap throw-in for four or five teams, where all of a sudden you get traded to four or five teams because your money works. I want him to end his career with dignity. He's a guy that plays hard every single night. He's a winner. I love the way he plays the game. I'm going to need more from him as we continue to move forward. And not just playing-wise, but leadership.”

--Doug Collins, Jan. 12, 2013