Sixers-Wizards: 5 things you need to know

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Sixers-Wizards: 5 things you need to know

The Sixers (13-27) will attempt to end their two-game skid when they continue their road trip against the Washington Wizards (19-20).

Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. (TCN) at the Verizon Center.

Let’s take a closer look at the matchup:

1. Moving on
It was ugly. You know it. They know it. Everyone knows it.

The rebuilding Sixers have had their share of brutal defeats this season, but Saturday night’s loss to the Chicago Bulls was certainly one of the worst. The Sixers were held to a season-low 78 points, shot 35.1 percent from the field and a dismal 10.5 percent from three-point range.

To make matters worse, Tony Wroten, James Anderson and Brandon Davies all suffered injuries.

The Sixers will try to put that nightmare behind them in a Martin Luther King Day matinee against a Wizards team that has been consistently inconsistent all season.

The Wizards appeared to be hitting their stride recently, winning a season-high three straight games before a hiccup against the Detroit Pistons on Saturday. That loss to the Pistons prevented the Wiz from getting over the .500 mark, a place the franchise hasn’t been since going 2-1 to start the 2009-10 season.

2. Wall ball
John Wall flat out gets up to play the Sixers.

Whether he merely sees a chance to attack mismatches or the fact that the No. 1 overall pick from the 2010 draft gets to face the team of the No. 2 pick that June, Evan Turner, the lightning-quick point guard has had his way against the Sixers.

Wall has averaged 19.2 points, 7.9 assists and 1.7 steals per game against the Sixers throughout his career. That point total has increased in recent matchups, with Wall averaging 24.7 points over the last three meetings.

The Wizards definitely go as Wall goes. When he scores at least 15 points, the Wizards are 18-10 this season. They are just 1-10 when he doesn’t reach that total.

The Sixers need to cut off Wall’s drives through the lane early in the game. That’s how Wall likes to get himself going, which gives him more confidence with the rest of his all-around game.

3. Slipping away
While the Sixers’ defensive focus should start with Wall, their offensive attention needs to be on taking care of the basketball.

The Sixers turned it over 17 more times against the Bulls to give them a whopping 64 turnovers in the last three games and push their league-worst average to 17.4 a night. The Sixers haven’t had under 15 turnovers since they had 10 against the Cleveland Cavaliers on Jan. 7.

Their tendency to give the ball away could certainly cost them in Monday’s matchup at “The Phone Booth.” The Wizards force 15.2 turnovers a game, tied for sixth in the NBA.

The Wiz don’t just force errors but they also capitalize on them. They are tied with the Sixers for seventh in the NBA in points off turnovers with 17.8 a game. The Wizards are also tied for seventh in fast-break points at 16.1 a game.

All numbers a team that turns it over as much as the Sixers don’t want to hear.

4. Injuries
Wroten (ankle), Anderson (back), Davies (finger) and Arnett Moultrie (ankle) are all day to day.

Nerlens Noel (knee) and Jason Richardson (knee) are out.

Trevor Booker (ankle) is day to day for the Wizards.

Al Harrington (knee) and Glen Rice, Jr. (wrist) are out.

5. This and that
• The Sixers have 11 straight road losses to Eastern Conference teams since beating the Wizards back on Nov. 1.

• The Wizards are 6-14 when allowing 100 points or more this season.

• Thaddeus Young is averaging just 11.0 points per game over the last three.

With T.J. McConnell, Hawks say Sixers have 'identity' worth respecting

With T.J. McConnell, Hawks say Sixers have 'identity' worth respecting

ATLANTA – The final score was a little lopsided and the game was sloppy at times, but after beating Philadelphia, 110-93, Saturday night, the Hawks said they see promise in the rising young Sixers.

The Sixers didn’t have the legs on the tail end of back-to-back games to keep up with another hot team, and Joel Embiid did not play, as Atlanta (26-18) won for the 11th time in 13 games to move within a half game of Boston for the No. 3 spot in the East.

Yet if not for the Sixers' 21 turnovers and a second quarter where Atlanta seemed to make every shot, the Sixers (15-27) looked enough like the team that had won eight of 10 games before arriving in Philips Arena that the Hawks see differences.

The biggest change in the Sixers between Saturday and the first two meetings of the season between these two teams — one played with Embiid and one without — is T.J. McConnell starting at point guard rather than Sergio Rodriguez.

McConnell had a game-high 11 assists against the Hawks in addition to his eight points, and the Sixers had 27 assists on a night where they hit 12 of 29 three-pointers.

“They have an identity,” said Atlanta forward Kent Bazemore, who scored 16. “McConnell is playing really well, putting pressure on the defense and their floor spacing is very good. Very disciplined group.

“Guys are in the right spots, if a guy drives, they have a plethora of options: a guy in the corner, a guy on the jumper, a guy on the wing. They kept us honest for a chunk of the game.”

Ersan Ilyasova scored 21 points on 15 shots and Robert Covington added 15 points and 10 rebounds, but the Sixers were gassed in the second quarter, as the Hawks hit 16 of 23 shots in a 37-point period.

Atlanta stretched a 62-54 halftime lead to 18 points late in the third quarter, but the Sixers cut the deficit to 94-87 with 6:46 left in the game on a pair of free throws by rookie Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot.

The Sixers whipped the Hawks, 20-11, in fast break points.

“They were getting some threes in transition,” said Hawks head coach Mike Budenholzer, who was on the Spurs' staff for years with Sixers head coach Brett Brown. “Right now, they’re pushing the pace.

“T.J. McConnell does a great job of getting outlets, getting up the court and finding shooters quickly and they’re letting it fly. Covington and Ilyasova and those guys are collapsing us early and shooting early threes.”

The Sixers had problems on the boards in Atlanta, where Dwight Howard grabbed 15 and Paul Millsap added 10 as the Hawks built a 48-38 rebounding edge. Those numbers were every bit as important as Millsap’s 21 points and the 13 added by Howard.

That disparity on the boards and the Sixers' collective loose handle did in the visitors. Atlanta scored 17 points off the Sixers’ 21 turnovers.

Embiid was scheduled to rest Saturday anyway. It’s unclear whether he’ll play Tuesday against the Clippers, who will be without guard Chris Paul and forward Blake Griffin, or Wednesday at Milwaukee.

Embiid suffered a knee contusion in Friday night’s 93-92 win over the Trail Blazers and Brown said he’d be further evaluated Sunday.

Get him back in the mix, and The Sixers have a shot at starting another winning streak.

“We did a good shot of holding them to one shot,” Howard said after the Hawks outscored the Sixers, 14-0, in second-chance points. “They play really hard. They play aggressive. They play good team basketball. They share the ball and find the open man. They have a good group of young guys.

“It wasn’t as easy as people expect out of Philly teams. You have to respect them.”

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich blasts President Trump

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich blasts President Trump

CLEVELAND — Gregg Popovich would bench President Donald Trump.

San Antonio's longtime coach, who has been highly critical of Trump in the past, went on a lengthy rant about the new president on Saturday night, calling him a bully and saying he hopes he can change while in office.

While meeting with reporters before the Spurs played the NBA champion Cavaliers, Popovich didn't hold back in offering his disdain for Trump and members of his administration.

Popovich initially was asked about his views on the women's marches in Washington and around the world before he unloaded on Trump.

"Their message is obvious," the five-time champion coach said of the protesters. "Our president comes in with the lowest (approval) rating of anybody whoever came into the office. And there's a majority of people out there, since Hillary (Clinton) won the popular vote, that don't buy his act. And I just wish that he was more -- had the ability to be more -- mature enough to do something that really is inclusive rather than just talking and saying, `I'm going to include everybody.'

"He could talk to the groups that he disrespected and maligned during the primary and really make somebody believe it. But so far, we've got (to) a point where you really can't believe anything that comes out of his mouth. You really can't."

As he said following Trump's election in November, Popovich wants Trump to succeed but believes he will do so only if he changes.

Popovich pointed out that Trump visited CIA headquarters on his first official day in office, but used the occasion to talk about himself.

"Instead of honoring the 117 people behind him where he was speaking, he talked about the size of the crowd," Popovich said. "That's worrisome. I'd just feel better if somebody was in that position that showed the maturity and psychological and emotional level of somebody that was his age. It's dangerous and it doesn't do us any good. I hope he does a great job, but there's a difference between respecting the office of the presidency and who occupies it.

"And that respect has to be earned."

Popovich was also critical of those who don't hold Trump accountable for his words.

"It's hard to be respectful of someone when we all have kids and we're watching him be misogynistic and xenophobic and racist and make fun of handicapped people. And what really bothers me are the people around him: the Sean Spicers, the Kellyanne Conways, the Reince Priebuses that know who he is and actually have the cynical approach and disingenuous attitude to really defend him and try to make it look like he didn't say what he said.

"And so when he's mad at the media for them reporting what he said, that just boggles my mind."

Popovich said others would have been punished for some of the things Trump has said in the past, including when he mocked a reporter with a disability.

"If our children would've said it, we would have grounded him for six months," he said. "Without a doubt. But we ignore all that because, because why? That says something about all of us and that's what's dangerous, or that's what scares the hell out of me to this day. It makes me uneasy."

Popovich concluded his rant about Trump by decrying his inability to handle media criticism.

"It does boggle the mind how somebody can be so thin skinned," he said. "It's all obvious, it's about him. If anything affects him, if it's `Saturday Night Live' or `Hamilton,' or she got 3 more million votes than you. `They're illegal.' It doesn't matter what it is, there's a pattern there. And that's dangerous. I'd like to have someone with gravitas, but he got there through the electoral college, which is part of our system, and I hope he does some good things.

"There was a young lady on today who said, `I just wished he had gone up there and said something like, and I know I said certain things, or you know I would really like to bring the people who don't feel, or I know some of you are scared.' But he can't do that because bullies don't do that. That's why."