Transcript: Doug Collins goes off on Sixers after loss

2-26-13-doug-collins-presser.jpg

Transcript: Doug Collins goes off on Sixers after loss

After the Sixers' 98-84 loss to the lowly Orlando Magic on Tuesday at the Wells Fargo Center (see story), a clearly frustrated Doug Collins held a memorable press conference. Here's the transcript:

On his team's lack of effort:

"Well I sure didn't see this effort coming. I thought we played incredibly hard against Miami. I thought we played incredibly hard in New York on Sunday. And this is mind-numbing to me. We went up 29-20, and from that point on, I couldn't even tell you what occurred.

"[Pat Summitt] is one of the all-time great coaches, and she spoke at my clinic when I was in Chicago, and she was incredible. And I'll never forget what she said. She said when she goes into young ladies' homes to recruit them, she said there are three things that you have to bring in my program: energy, effort and execution. And I'm in charge of one of them: execution."

On if they don't realize how desperate they should be playing? (Bob Cooney of Daily News)

"Bob, you know what man, I wish I knew. I wish I knew. I really do. I gotta tell you. I'm sitting there. I gave my body to this franchise. I was never booed as a player. Never. I ran through my sneakers."

On if it's a bad mix: (by John Gonzalez of CSNPhilly.com)

"I think the team that we've tried to put together, Gonzo, we've never seen. And so I think what happens is, when you take a huge piece away from it, your warts show."

On leaving the court before the buzzer:

"I thought the clock was going to wind down. I didn't realize they were going to take a shot clock violation."

Wasn't out of frustration?

"Oh no no no no no. I thought the clock was going to wind down. I didn't realize there was a differential. I've done that before."

On if his players have become comfortable losing:

"You would have to ask them that. I don't know. I do not know. The thing about it is, I can't speak for others. Damien Wilkins -- I mean he's been one of our best players since coming back from break. I told you, I did not think our guys prepared themselves during the break to come back to play."

On if there's anything he can do:

"Can I tell you something? If everybody looked inside themselves as much as I did, this world would be a CAT scan. OK? I mean, believe me, there's not two days go by that I don't to go Rod [Thorn], I don't go to Tony [DiLeo] -- what can I do? Can I do anything different? How can I be a better coach? How can I be a better leader? How can I help these guys? Sometimes you've gotta help yourself. You know? Sometimes you've gotta help yourself. Youth is a very blaming thing."

On if his players ever go to him and ask how they can get better:

"No. I usually go to them.

"And, you know what, after a while, the talk gets old. Man, it gets old. It just does.

"At some point and time, you just gotta play. I told them at halftime, the game's not about X's and O's. We went up 29-20 -- it wasn't about X's and O's. [The Magic] scored 14 out of 20 possessions going into half. We came out, we were going to be all fired up, and it was a 7-0 run before we could blink. It was almost identical to New York. We were down 12 and we gave them an 8-0 run.

"And it's incredibly frustrating, yes, it is. But my job is to not put that kind of product on the floor. I'm incredibly hard on myself. I love it when the fans start yelling at me -- I'm not playing. You didn't yell at me when I played. Why are you yelling at me when I'm coaching?

On whether he has leaders:

"I think we have some guys who have some capability. I say all the time ... they say it's a players' league, well then take ownership. Take ownership. That's all I'm asking: Take ownership of what you're putting out there.

"To me, I'm a day's work for a day's pay kind of guy. That all I've ever been taught. And the one thing I have to understand is -- from me staying up, working harder, not sleeping -- that's not going to help anything. There's nothing wrong with our preparation.

"I looked out there to start the game and three guys weren't even sweating when we started the game. They're going to ease themselves into the game. You've gotta get sweaty, you've gotta get ready to go. So we started out at the break, and we come over to the bench and we're 6-for-18 [shooting] to start the game.

Media relations official says only a couple more questions:

"Yeah, go ahead, I don't mind. Hey, I'm having fun. I feel like I'm at the State of the Union."

On why Andrew Bynum wasn't on the bench:

"Does he sit out there all the time? I don't know. I mean, I don't even know. A lot of times he sits back there and gets treatment. I know he's going to talk to you guys tomorrow.

"You know guys, it's been hard. I think there's a part of this group wondering, 'Are you gonna play? Aren't you gonna play?' And it's been a tough year.

On why he had four starters on the bench early in the fourth quarter:

"Hey, you know what? They weren't getting it done. What were we down, 17? We went from seven to 17. And I go back to [coach Hank Iba], that voice I always here, 'Hey son, if you don't want to play, your substitute does. Give somebody else a chance.' We did and we cut it to five. It wasn't anything other than getting some stops, push the ball, play with some aggression. Basketball is a simple sport. The game is usually going to go to the aggressor. That's just the way it is.

"I'm disappointed. I really, really am, because there was so much this season that we were looking forward to. And it just seems like every time we turn around it's been something else.

On how much injuries have dragged down this team:

“We made a huge deal and we have nobody playing a part of that deal. How many teams can give up Andre Iguodala, Moe Harkless and Nikola Vucevic and have nothing in return playing? That’s tough to overcome. That’s just the facts. I’m not looking for any outs. That’s a fact. Nik Vucevic had 19 rebounds tonight. Spencer [Hawes] had one, I think Lavoy [Allen] had two.”

On playing better before Thad got hurt:

“We are a team, I told you, that least little change affects us. You know, all of a sudden the starting lineup changes again. We have guys that don’t deal well with that. We’re not a team that rolls with that easily. We had Thad, we’re use to him. I thought Thad didn’t have the energy tonight that he had in New York. Sometimes that’s what happens, second game back. You know, the first game, running on adrenalin and that second game you just don’t have the juice. I just didn’t see that pop with Thad tonight but he had been out three weeks.

"We put so much on Jrue and Thad, if those two guys play well we have a chance. We got a chance because we’ll find three or four guys during the course of the game, but those two guys are critical for us. Thad gives us that speed and what he brings with the glue and Jrue is our all-star. I just don’t want you to think I’m up here blaming. I don’t want you to think I’m making excuses. That’s not what this is about. I’m not a blamer; I’m not an excuse kind of guy. No one takes this harder than I do. Nobody and I am a guy who, when I have coached, I’ve always been able to find some answers and I’ve not been able to find answers.

"And from my standpoint that is very disappointing because I’m paid to do that. I want you to know, that in no way am I casting dispersions on somebody else’s fault. We’re all in this together, but there cannot be a game that you just don’t go out and put your heart and soul into the game. Can’t do that. Had an off day, we’ve been on the all-star break. There’s no reason for that. None.”

On where do you go from here/is this a bottoming out:

“I sure hope so. I sure hope it can’t get any worse than this, but I mean, if you look at our schedule, 12 of our last 14 are on the road and look at the home games we’re playing: Atlanta, Golden State. Every one of them is a playoff team. But it’s interesting, the one thing my team has really never done is. I’ve always said ‘Beat the team you’re supposed to beat and let’s see where you are against the others.’ And it seems like for us we’ve laid some eggs in here against some teams we’ve had a chance to beat and then we’ve played pretty well -- San Antonio, Memphis, Miami -- played well, but they were still better than us and beat us, and that’s what you can’t do.”

Adjusting to new home, Ben Simmons plays role model at Sixers Camp

Adjusting to new home, Ben Simmons plays role model at Sixers Camp

WAYNE, Pa. — Three steps. 

That’s all it takes before Ben Simmons is recognized walking through the streets of Philadelphia. 

This year’s No. 1 pick has been in the spotlight long before the Sixers drafted him in June, and now he's experiencing what it's like to be known as an NBA player in his new city. 

“I’ve been enjoying walking around South Street, getting some Ishkabibble's,” Simmons said Tuesday after a special appearance at the Sixers' Camp at Valley Forge Military Academy. 

At 6-foot-10, Simmons towers above most on the court, let alone on the sidewalk. Fans have been eager to welcome him to Philadelphia for a new chapter of the organization after three years of struggle. 

“Positive things,” Simmons said of the comments he receives. “I think a lot of people are excited, so I’ve been looking forward to it.”

Simmons understands the impact a professional athlete can have on young fans, and was excited to be at camp Tuesday.

Growing up in Australia, he never had the opportunity to hear from NBA players when he attended basketball camps. Now that he's in that position, the 20-year-old was glad to provide that memory to the 240 campers. 

“That would mean a lot if I was able to experience that,” Simmons said. 

Simmons demonstrated skill drills, such as passing fundamentals, interacted in a Q&A session and signed autographs for each camper. He also took individual photos for those who traveled internationally, including from Nigeria, Italy and Greece. 

“I’m just like them, but older,” Simmons said. “I’m just trying to be a good role model to them.”

Simmons plans to spend most of the offseason in Philadelphia as he gets settled into the city. He still has to move into his new home, but at least he knows where to get a cheesesteak in the meantime. 

NBA Notes: Dion Waiters signs 1-year deal with Heat

NBA Notes: Dion Waiters signs 1-year deal with Heat

Two people with knowledge of the situation tell The Associated Press that the Miami Heat have agreed to terms on a one-year deal with free agent guard Dion Waiters.

The two sides came to agreement on Monday. Waiters will make $2.9 million. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the team has not announced the deal.

Waiters averaged 9.8 points for the Oklahoma City Thunder last year, but had several big games in the playoffs. He played particularly well against Dallas and San Antonio in the playoffs before his role was reduced in the seven-game loss to the Golden State Warriors in the Western Conference finals.

Waiters will give the Heat another scorer off the bench (see full story).

Blazers: C.J. McCullom inked to four-year extension
PORTLAND, Ore. -- A person familiar with the deal confirms that guard CJ McCollum has agreed to a four-year, $106 million contract extension with the Portland Trail Blazers.

The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity on Monday because the deal hadn't been formally announced by the team. It was first reported by Yahoo Sports.

McCollum, who was named the NBA's Most Improved Player, averaged 20.8 points, 3.2 rebounds and 4.3 assists for the Blazers during the regular season. He raised his scoring average by more than 14 points over the previous season.

As the 10th overall pick for the Blazers in the 2013 draft, McCollum bided his time on the bench for his first two seasons. He became a starter in the backcourt with Damian Lillard last season after four of the team's starters departed in the offseason (see full story).

Michael Jordan donates $2 million to ease racial tensions
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Michael Jordan is trying to help ease tension between African-Americans and law enforcement.

The NBA great and Charlotte Hornets owner said Monday he's giving $1 million to the Institute for Community-Police Relations and $1 million to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The aim is to help build trust following several shootings around the country.

Jordan says in a statement to The Associated Press on Monday that "as a proud American, a father who lost his own dad in a senseless act of violence, and a black man, I have been deeply troubled by the deaths of African-Americans at the hands of law enforcement and angered by the cowardly and hateful targeting and killing of police officers," (see full story).

Sixers officially sign guard Brandon Paul

Sixers officially sign guard Brandon Paul

The Sixers continued to add to their roster Monday, announcing the signing of guard Brandon Paul. 

Paul participated on the Sixers' summer league squad in Las Vegas, where he averaged 10.7 points, 3.2 rebounds and 0.7 assists in 19.5 minutes. He also played for the Hornets in Utah. 

The 25-year-old went undrafted out Illinois in 2013 and has been playing overseas and in the D-League since then. Last season, he led FIATC Joventut (Spain) in scoring with 13.2 points per game. Paul also has been a member of the Canton Charge (D-League) and Nizhny Novgorod (Russia). 

Next season he could play for the Sixers' Development League affiliate, the Delaware 87ers. 

Paul is one of several offseason additions for the Sixers. The team has signed Ben Simmons, Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot, Dario Saric, Jerryd Bayless, Gerald Henderson, Sergio Rodriguez, James Webb III and Shawn Long. The Sixers also have reportedly agreed to a deal with Cat Barber.