Dammit Spencer Hawes Stop Teasing Us Like This

Dammit Spencer Hawes Stop Teasing Us Like This

On March 3rd of this year, exactly four weeks ago to the day, Spencer
Hawes had the worst game of his career, and arguably one of the worst
games ever posted by a starting center in the National Basketball
Association, at home against the Golden State Warriors. In about 20
minutes of game action, he scored 0 points on stunning 0-9 shooting,
with four rebounds and two dimes, but also three turnovers and three
personal fouls. (Amazingly, the Sixers still won the game somehow.) It
was an absolutely embarrassing performance in an already disappointing
season that made you wonder if Doug Collins was going to gently,
tenderly asphyxiate him as he slept on the team plane that night,
putting him out of both of their misery.


Since that game, Spencer Hawes has basically been Marc Gasol.

OK,
that's not really true—Gasol has the defensive-anchor bonafides that
Spence, at his best, simply never will, as anyone who watched Hawes
whiff on blocked shot after blocked shot as a help defender in the last
two games against the likes of Kemba Walker and Shaun Livingston will
attest. But if you gave Spencer Hawes' stat line over the 16 games since
the Golden State humiliation to an impartial observer and asked them to
name the player responsible for it, Memphis' all-around beast of an an
All-Star center would be the most logical guess. I mean, look at this
thing:



That's 16 games for which Spence is averaging 15
and 10 a game, on 53.5% shooting along with 50% from three (!!!) and
even 84% from the foul line, to go with about four assists and two
blocks a game, and just two turnovers and 3.4 personal fouls in 32
minutes a night. Those aren't just All-Star numbers; if he had them for a
full season they'd be putting Spence in All-NBA discussion, better than
(or at least comparable to) the lines posted by the likes of Joakim
Noah, Tyson Chandler and (yes) Marc Gasol. Again, Spence will never have
the all-around defensive impact of those three stars, but when you're
getting statistical production of this caliber from your big man, it's
hard to be too critical.


This should be cause for excitement, right? After all, despite being
in his sixth NBA season, Spencer is still just a
young-and-impressionable 24 years old, not hitting the quarter-century
mark until late April. He's signed for another year with the Sixers for
an unexorbitant $6.5 million, and with no assurances for the future with
Andrew Bynum, to have a backup plan (for next year and after) like this
version of Spencer Hawes could give the team a ton of options when
figuring out where their team goes from here. And hell, he's helping
them win games—after losing their first five after the Golden State
game, the team has gone 7-4 since, including the team's first three-game
winning streak since early February, cemented with the team's most
recent victory over the Bobcats.


Unfortunately, Sixers fans have seen this movie before. At the
beginning of last year's lockout-shortened season, Spence looked like he
was going to fulfill Yahoo hoops writer Adrian Wojnarowski's prediction
of winning the year's Most Imrpoved Player honors. He averaged a
double-double over his first eight games, on league-leading 63%
shooting, with three assists and a couple blocks as well. Then injuries
slowed down his season, and when he came back, seemingly fully healthy,
he was back to the player he was the year before—bringing it some
nights, disappearing others, showing flashes of a blue-chip player but
never doing it with any degree of consistency.


And after three years as a Liberty Baller, that's what most of us
have taken to be the norm with Spencer—inconsistency. Like the Sixers'
other tease of a lottery pick, Evan Turner (who, incidentally, has also
come to life a bit lately, scoring 20 in back-to-back games for the
first time since January), it's impossible to trust that the Spence we
see when he's draining jumpers and finishing on putbacks and running our
offense from the high post is the same one we're going to see this time
next week, or next month, or next year. Seemingly at a moment's notice,
he can lose the range, let himself get pushed around inside, and try to
force passes as a distributor, turning into a liability on both ends of
the court.


In the eight games that preceded his recent hot streak—all Sixer
losses, besides the Golden State catastrophe—Spence averaged just nine
points sand seven rebounds on awful 32% shooting, with as many turnovers
and assists, just one block a game, and 0 three-point makes. Even if
this is his longest stretch of quality play—and 16 games is nothing to
sneeze at, certainly—there's simply no guarantee that his level of play
next year, or even for the rest of this season, will come anywhere near
this. Every game is a new opportunity for Spence's play to start
regressing back to the mean.


At this point in the season, when it's too late for an improved
Spencer to do anything for us but cost us ping-pong balls in the
lottery, it's hard not to be a little angry at this guy for teasing us
once again. We'd finally contented ourselves that the Big GOPper was
just never gonna be that good, that his miserable defense would always
outweigh his sporadically inspired offense, that his pedigree and
potential was always gonna come with too many caveats to be worth
investing in. But now here we are again, wondering "Well, maybe this
time it's for real?" And maybe it is—possibly maybe—but given Spence's
past history, you'd have to be described with a "G" word that you can't
find in the dictionary to believe it with any seriousness.


At the very least, Sixers fans should be thankful that Spence is
under contract with the team for another season, since it means there's
no chance (less of a chance, anyway) that the Sixers will reward his
recent hot play with a short-sighted, long-term-damaging multi-year
contract extension, as you know they're just itching to do. Do it for a
whole season, Spencer—next season, perhaps, if you're so inclined—and
then we'll have some degree of faith that you're the real deal. Until
then, we wish you'd stop strutting around all coy and peacock-like on
the court when we know it's all just gonna end in frustration and
disappointment.

Flyers' Legion of Doom line to reunite on ice at Hall of Fame Legends Classic

Flyers' Legion of Doom line to reunite on ice at Hall of Fame Legends Classic

One of the most beloved lines in Philadelphia Flyers history will skate again.

Eric Lindros confirmed on Friday afternoon that he will reunite with former teammates John LeClair and Mikael Renberg to bring back the Legion of Doom and will play in the Legends Classic at the Hockey Hall of Fame in November in Toronto.

The news comes courtesy of the Big E on Twitter.

Team Lindros, which will be made up of NHL greats, will take on Team Salming, which will be made up of Toronto Maple Leafs greats and led by Borje Salming.

The Legion of Doom was hoping to see a reunion back when the Winter Classic alumni game was held in Philadelphia at Citizens Bank Park on Dec. 31, 2011, but Renberg was unable to attend.

The Legends Classic will take place on the same weekend Lindros will be inducted into the Hall of Fame alongside Sergei Makarov, Rogie Vachon, and Pat Quinn.

NFL Notes: Dolphins' Dion Jordan reinstated by NFL after sitting out 2015

NFL Notes: Dolphins' Dion Jordan reinstated by NFL after sitting out 2015

DAVIE, Fla. -- Miami Dolphins defensive end Dion Jordan has been reinstated by the NFL after sitting out last season for his latest violation of the league's substance abuse policy.

Jordan applied to the league in May for reinstatement, and he was cleared to return Friday as the Dolphins held their first training camp practice.

The overall No. 3 selection in the 2013 draft out of Oregon, Jordan has contributed little so far in his career. He's coming back from his second suspension under the NFL substance abuse policy.

Jordan has played in only 26 games with one start, totaling 46 tackles and three sacks. The Miami group that drafted Jordan is gone, and he returns to a new coaching staff led by head coach Adam Gase.

JAGUARS: Lee sidelined with hamstring injury
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Oft-injured receiver Marqise Lee stayed healthy for one day in training camp.

The Jacksonville Jaguars held Lee out of practice Friday with a left hamstring injury, the latest setback for a third-year pro who can't seem to stay on the field.

Lee has missed significant time with ankle, hamstring and knee injuries. He practiced so little last summer that offensive coordinator Greg Olson said Lee was "like the albino tiger at the zoo. If you get there and you're lucky enough to get him to come out of the cave and see him, it's a good day."

Lee embraced the nickname, but had hoped to make it part of his past and not a pattern. Now, he's back on the sideline.

Running back T.J. Yeldon (right ankle) also was held out.

SAINTS: Nicks joins camp roster
WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Former New York Giants receiver Hakeem Nicks has joined the New Orleans Saints at training camp.

Nicks, who practiced with New Orleans for the first time on Friday, is taking a spot on the 90-man preseason roster that opened up when the Saints placed Vincent Brown on injured reserve.

The 28-year-old Nicks, who posted 1,000-yard seasons in 2010 and 2011, has been far less productive since and likely will need to demonstrate the promise of a significant resurgence to make the regular season roster.

Last season, he played in only six games with the Giants, catching seven passes for 54 yards and no touchdowns.

Now he'll try to carve out a role on a New Orleans receiver corps led by Brandin Cooks, Willie Snead, Brandon Coleman and rookie Michael Thomas.

DOLPHINS: Team confident stadium renovations will be completed on time
DAVIE, Fla. -- The Miami Dolphins say their $500 million stadium renovation will be completed as scheduled and in time for the team's final exhibition game Sept. 1.

Work continues 24 hours a day on upgrades that include a canopy. Dolphins owner Stephen Ross said Friday the stadium will be ready for the preseason finale against the Tennessee Titans.

The Dolphins say the Miami Hurricanes will open their season at the stadium as scheduled Sept. 3 against Florida A&M.

Ross says the Dolphins' 2015 and 2016 seasons left an eight-month window for the renovation, which normally would have taken about 12 months.

He says there's no backup plan for a Dolphins game site if the stadium isn't ready on time.

Jason Peters: 'So long as I'm healthy, I'm going to be a dominant force'

Jason Peters: 'So long as I'm healthy, I'm going to be a dominant force'

Jason Peters long has been the foundation of the Eagles' offense, so much so its success seems to be tied to his play. At least, it's probably no coincidence the club's last two losing seasons -- 2012 and 2015 -- corresponded with injuries to the left tackle.

To the extent quad and back injuries hurt Peters' performance last year, or how much of his decline can be traced to the fact that he turned 34 in January, nobody can say for sure. Either way, there's plenty of skepticism as to whether he's still reliable, much less if he can return to his All-Pro form.

For what it's worth, Peters doesn't sound like he shares those concerns. He arrived at training camp feeling rejuvenated and believes he has some good years left.

"I feel like I have gas in the tank," said Peters following Thursday's first full-team practice. "Before I got hurt, I wasn't even getting beat. At the same time, we were 1 on 1 on every play. Those guys get paid too, so you're gonna win some, you're gonna lose some."

Peters described himself as being at 75 percent for much of last season, adding that he doesn't need any extra motivation or feel as though he has anything to prove.

"No, I'm in Philly," said Peters. "Y'all get on me every year. I've been here since '09, and I've had a chip on my shoulder ever since I [came into the league] in '04, so I just come to play. The fans deserve championships and division titles, so that's what I'm striving for."

The eight-time Pro Bowler used the Eagles' Week 17 finale against the New York Giants -- a game in which he kept veteran defensive end Robert Ayers (now with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers) at bay -- as evidence he can still play.

"I show them every year," Peters says of his critics. "I got banged up last year, and then we finished with a win against the Giants. If you put the tape on, Ayers was trying to beat me. He was a free agent and he's a good rusher.

"So as long as I'm healthy, I'm going to be a dominant force."

Strong words, but Peters has reasons to feel confident beyond recovering from injuries.

Last season, he showed up for camp at a reduced weight, a decision offensive linemen often make in an effort to prolong their careers. While it's worked for others, Peters now believes it wasn't the right move for him.

"I tapered down last year and I felt like it took away from some of my game a little bit. This year I put on about 10 to 12 (pounds) and I feel real good. I feel stronger and I'm ready to go," said Peters, adding that he's back back to his preferred playing weight of 345.

But perhaps the aspect Peters is most optimistic for in 2016 is the head coaching change to Doug Pederson and how that equates to a return to a familiar offensive system and approach.

Peters is incredibly versatile and could've played in any scheme, at least he could in his prime. Based on some of the other comments he made however, clearly he did not find Chip Kelly's methods to be ideal (see story). More specifically, he made no secret of his affinity for Pederson's mentor and long-time Eagles head coach Andy Reid.

"Just getting back into this, the ground and pound, the old Andy Reid offense, I'm excited," said Peters.

"I can adjust to any offense, you've seen that," Peters continued. "From (offensive line coaches) Howard Mudd to (Jeff Stoutland) to (Juan Castillo), they all teach different schemes and different techniques, and it really doesn't matter. I'm happy to have the Andy Reid era back, which is Doug, and I'm ready to go."

Pederson also plans to rest Peters during the season in an effort to keep the aging left tackle ready for gameday, which he admits "caught up to" him last season.

Despite his confidence level remaining high, Peters is realistic too and understands he can't play in the NFL forever. While he wouldn't go so far as to put an expiration date on his career, he knows at this point that any season could be his last.

"I'm year to year," Peters admitted. "I don't want to put a number on it. You can watch me out here, watch some of the younger guys, and you can be the judge."

Maybe that's why 2015 under Kelly was an especially tough year.

"It was frustrating," admitted Peters. "An older guy like me, I'm just trying to get that ring, and to keep losing like that, it was hurtful."

Beyond getting healthy, most of all Peters just sounds happy to put the drama of the past year behind him. And despite all of the concerns over what he has left, there's little doubt he still gives the Eagles to win on Sundays when he's in the lineup.