How much did Kwame Brown make per game? Per minute? Per point?

How much did Kwame Brown make per game? Per minute? Per point?

Kwame Brown's tenure as a Philadelphia 76er came to an end Wednesday night around 5 p.m.

The Sixers waived Brown and Darius Morris prior to their loss to the Raptors to sign guards Lorenzo Brown and Elliot Williams.

Explaining the moves, Brett Brown cited Tony Wroten's play as what pushed Morris out the door, and Kwame ... Kwame "was never able to get on a court."

Specifically:

Is there anyone who can't believe Kwame didn't make it to the end of an unnecessary two-year deal?

The guy played nine games the season prior and some combination of Doug Collins, Tony DiLeo and Rod Thron decided it best to give him a player-option.

From most of what's been reported, it seems as if Kwame, less so than having actual injuries, lacked any real desire to play. John Finger sums it up this way:

In addition to the 30 consecutive DNP-CDs, Brown struggled with injuries during training camp and never got it going. He struggled with a litany of injuries, aches, pains and, perhaps most importantly, motivation. Brown left the team briefly to tend to “personal issues.” When he returned to the team, he missed another practice with more “personal issues” and then was scratched from a game with a sinus infection. A source said Brown often visited the training room and skipped practices complaining of injuries that didn’t exist.

So -- as I baited you with in the headline -- how much did Kwame actually make as a Sixer? Well, once he exercised his player-option this summer, his contract became a two-year deal worth just shy of $6 million. To keep the math nice and neat, we're just calling it $6 million.

If we use this 2011 figure from Grantland as a jumping-on point, that means Brown, the former No. 1 overall pick of the 2001 draft, has now made $64.4 million playing for eight different teams -- even though he never actually appeared in a game as a Milwaukee Buck.

Just pertaining to his Sixers career, Brown played 22 games, 269 total minutes and recorded 41 points, 74 rebounds, 9 assists, 10 blocks and 17 made field goals.

If we break down his contract by each of those numbers independently, then, as a Sixer, Kwame made ...

  • $272,727.27 per game
  • $146,341.46 per point
  • $81,081.08 per rebound
  • $666,666.67 per assist (seems apropos)
  • $600,000.00 per block
  • $352,941.18 per field goal
  • $22,304.83 per minute

If you think any one of those numbers are horrifying, consider that Brown has made $13 million in his last two contracts over the last three seasons playing 31 games for three different teams -- even though, again, he never actually appeared in a game as a Milwaukee Buck.

If you think about it that way, then Kwame, in the last three seasons, has made:

  • $419,354.84 per game

Lest no one forget the report from John Mitchell last year that Doug Collins actually wanted give Kwame five years and $30 million. Who knows how true that is or was. Let's just end it with these:

The timeless question: Who's stealing money in the NBA?

Previously:
>>Photos: Kwame Brown is huge in Spain
>>Video: That One Time Kwame Brown Swatted Dwight Howard
>>Kobe: ‘What was I supposed to do? Pass it to … Kwame Brown?’

Union want to send off Tranquillo Barnetta with MLS Cup win

usa-tranquillo-barnetta.jpg
USA Today Images

Union want to send off Tranquillo Barnetta with MLS Cup win

CHESTER, Pa. — Union head coach Jim Curtin knows it may seem like a weird situation to some.

Early on Tuesday morning, as soccer fans around the area were just waking up, the Union issued a press release that stated that Tranquillo Barnetta would be leaving the team at the end of the 2016 season (see story)

There was no trade. No sale. No contract dispute. No off-the-field issues. 

It was simply a case of a player — a really good player — deciding before the end of the season that he wanted to say goodbye to MLS and finish his pro career with his hometown club in St. Gallen, Switzerland. 

“I think it’s unique maybe to the American public and fan bases that a guy announces it and there’s still [part of] a season left to play,” Curtin said during his weekly press conference. “I think it’s strange for everyone to hear it that way. But in Europe that’s kind of the norm. To get out ahead of it shows what kind of man and leader he is. He addressed the team and didn’t want it to be a situation where something leaked out. He’s a true pro. I’m honored to have coached him and I want to prolong it as long as I possibly can.”

In other American leagues, of course, a talented but aging player with Barnetta’s pedigree might drum up a bidding war to try to get one more good contract in free agency before he retires, perhaps using a strong playoff performance to do so. But, as Curtin alluded to, global soccer is a whole different animal. And Barnetta never planned to use his 2016 performance as a launching pad to a new deal with Philly or something bigger on a different MLS team.

His plan all along was to retire for the hometown club he cheered for as a kid — and he made sure he’d have the freedom to do so when he signed with the Union last summer.

“We offered several years but he was very content and adamant about taking an 18-month deal,” Curtin said. “A lot of people say they’re not about the money but Tranquillo truly means when he says it. He came here at a very big discount to what his value was in the European market. And he had a goal of playing for his hometown club, which I respect at the end of the day.”

If there’s any knock against Barnetta, it’s that he essentially treated MLS as a short-term project, a way to try something new after an illustrious career in Switzerland and Germany, to live in a different part of the world and see different cities throughout the United States.

But make no mistake, he earned that right and he never tried to hire his future ambitions. And even if his tenure with the Union will be a short one, it’s been very beneficial for both sides.

Barnetta, for instance, learned about the grueling travel demands in MLS and the more physical nature of the league compared to ones in Europe, all while showing the sublime skill that made him a three-time World Cup veteran for Switzerland.

And the Union leaned on his talent and leadership at the end of their disappointing 2015 season and throughout the entire 2016 campaign with Curtin calling him “the best player that ever wore a Philadelphia Union jersey.”

“He’s a great example for our young guys,” the Union coach added. “He’s got a close relationship with a lot of the veteran guys. And he’s just a pleasure to have in the locker room. He comes to work with a smile on his face but when it’s time to work, he’s the hardest worker there is. A true professional. And the pedigree is the highest we’ve ever had in this club.”

You can make the case that acquiring players with great pedigrees hasn’t always worked to the Union’s benefit (see: Mbolhi, Rais), but it’s hard to find any fault in the Barnetta deal, especially when you consider Philadelphia got him at a discount and that Curtin and technical director Chris Albright orchestrated the signing at a time when the franchise was in a state of flux and sporting director Earnie Stewart had yet to join the fold. 

For someone that’s played in three World Cups, the Champions League and one of the top leagues in Europe, Barnetta may not be the biggest name out there. But getting him when they did was still something of a coup for Philadelphia. And the benefits will likely be reaped for a long time to come as the Union followed last year’s Barnetta signing with a couple of big moves in the offseason and this summer’s long-term acquisition of U.S. national team starter Alejandro Bedoya — the combination of which has them thinking about the playoffs and a whole lot more even as Barnetta’s departure looms.

“It’s something we want to celebrate rather than pity and feel bad,” Curtin said. “We’re happy for the time we’ve had him here. And now we’re gonna make it last as long as we possibly can. The rest of the games out, in the pregame talk, we’ll say, ‘Let’s extend this thing as long as possible and use it as a rallying cry.’ You don’t want it to come to an end. And when it does come to an end, you want it to be a special moment.”

What kind of special moment?

“We want his last game with the Philadelphia Union to be an MLS Cup.”

Another award: Carson Wentz named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Month

Another award: Carson Wentz named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Month

Three games into his NFL career, Carson Wentz might need a bigger trophy case.

The 23-year-old, who picked up his first NFC Offensive Player of the Week award for his performance against Pittsburgh, has been named the NFL's Offensive Rookie of the Month for September.

Yes, Wentz's first NFL month was a special one.

The No. 2 pick from North Dakota State has completed 64.7 percent of his passes for 769 yards, five touchdowns and zero interceptions. He's the first rookie in NFL history to put up those numbers in the first three games of a career. And his 102 straight passing attempts without an interception is also a rookie record.

It's hard to believe that a little over a week before the season began, Wentz was scheduled to be the Eagles' third-string quarterback and have a redshirt year. That all changed when de facto GM Howie Roseman traded away starter Sam Bradford and the team decided to start the rookie.

While many thought the decision to start Wentz was the beginning of a long rebuilding year, the rookie has the Eagles off to a fast 3-0 start. Wentz has played very well, but has also been aided by a stout defense, led by NFC Defensive Player of the Month Fletcher Cox.

This week, Wentz is spending some time hunting while the Eagles are on their bye week. He bagged another trophy on Thursday.

The team will be back in action on Oct. 9 in Detroit to face the Lions.

Visit TicketIQ to discover the lowest prices on Eagles tickets anywhere, zone-level ticket data and seat views from fans just like you!