Idea: State of the LOUnion Address

Idea: State of the LOUnion Address

For fans who suffered through the post-Brown to Pre-Collins era (alternate names considered for this era included "The Chris Ford Era," "The Randy Ayers Era," and "The Eddie Jordan Era" just to name a few), Lou Williams isn't just one of the longest tenured Sixers, he's the emotional link from the fans to the organization.

Whereas Evan Turner and Jrue Holiday are still building their relationships with the city, and whereas Andre Iguodala's contract has previously been an obstacle to a full embrace from the fans, Lou has really become "the guy."

Once an under-sized high schooler named "Louis," Philadelphia has done what it does best for its athletes -- shortened his name as a sign of affection. Sure, I remember "Louis Williams," but I feel like I have a history with "Lou Williams."

Sixers fans were treated to a whole lot of hype prior to this season's home opener in regard to just how elaborate the festivities would be. There was the mascot vote (that has yet to materialize in a mascot), the makeover of the Sixers dance team (which has been just fine with us), and even the hiring of Broadway light designers (where actually, the improvement has been noticeable).

All of these things are "nice," but, as we've so often made the point over the past year, mostly unnecessary. For basketball fans, the real fun is in the product on the floor. And so, ironically enough for the new owners who had just sunk some cash into some new bells and whistles, I suppose it wasn't any surprise that the most exciting part of that evening's introductions was also the cheapest.

When Lou Williams addressed the crowd following the player introductions, it lasted no longer than six seconds. Still, those six seconds totally trumped, in every way, everything else that had come before or would come after. For six seconds, Lou thanked us for our support, informed us that he had and his teammates had been working extremely hard and promised that the team wouldn't let us down.

Read that sentence again. Watch those six seconds again. Really -- what more could you ask for from an athlete or his team?

Unfortunately for the ongoing events of that night's pregame ceremonies, the indescribable hype I felt after hearing Lou address the crowd was squashed by poor scheduling. It wasn't that I didn't want to hear from Sixers legends like Doc, Moses, Bobby and World or even from the team's new owners in Josh Harris and Adam Aron; I just wanted Lou's words to be the last thing I heard before the the 76ers went out and pummeled the Detroit Pistons. I was amazed how little it took to get me from "excited" to "out of my seat." And, just to clarify, that was from my seat at home; I wasn't even in the building.

So when I did make it down to the Wells Fargo Center for the team's MLK matinee against the Mikwaukee Bucks just a few weeks later, I was looking forward to finally seeing what all the fuss was about with the Broadway lights and everything else. But I sure as hell wasn't expecting another pregame address from Lou.

Astonishingly, I got it. In honor of the memory of Martin Luther King, Jr., Lou Williams was handed a microphone shortly before tip-off to thank the fans for coming to the game in memory of King. Again, this took anywhere from 5-10 seconds and I went from wanting to watch a basketball game to screaming for Lou to drop 40 on Brandon Jennings and possibly break one of Jennings' ankles on a crossover.

Sometimes, it's the littlest touches that make the biggest difference. In the end, we don't need elaborate lights or a new dance team or free Big Mac vouchers. All we need is Andrew Toney to be welcomed back to the organization and for Lou Williams to tell us that he and his teammates won't let us down.

Given how The Flyers' "God Bless America" routine has become unfortunately over-exposed in recent years, I suggest that the Sixers develop a little tradition of their own, but only for special occasions. Call it the Lou Williams pregame monologue -- or, for you political junkies who are really revved up for tonight, The State of the LOUnion Address.

Potential topics for Lou's unexpected pregame monologues include (but are not limited to): "No one thinks we have a shot in hell to win the NBA Title, but we do. Thanks for your support," "This is a big one tonight, so we're gonna need y'all to get loud. Thanks for your support," and "There's just something about Nick Young's face that makes me want to go for 50 tonight. Thanks for your support."

Really, if Lou Williams can talk his way out of a mugging, imagine what he can talk you into just moments before a game.

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz's Rookie of the Year odds took a hit, the Eagles' Super Bowl odds shortened and the Vikings' lengthened after Sunday's 21-10 win.

The Eagles are 33/1 to win it all, a week after being listed by Bovada at 50/1. The Vikings, meanwhile, went from 7/1 to 9/1. They still have the third-shortest Super Bowl odds in the NFL and are two spots ahead of the Cowboys (14/1). 

Wentz, who had his worst statistical game against Minnesota, is now 9/1 to win NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, according to Bovada. Last Wednesday, he was 6/1.

Wentz trails Cowboys studs Ezekiel Elliott (2/5) and Dak Prescott (11/5) on that leaderboard.

As far as this week, Wentz is favored to throw for more yards than Prescott. Wentz is 5/7 to outgain Prescott through the air in Week 8, while Prescott is 1/1 to outgain Wentz.

Elliott's over/under rushing total against the Eagles is 99.5. He's rushed for 130-plus yards in each of his last four games, and the odds are 3/1 that he'll reach that number again this week. 

The Eagles have allowed just one 100-yard rusher this season, Washington's Matt Jones (16 for 135).

Elliott is also now on pace to break Eric Dickerson's rookie rushing record. Dickerson had 1,808 in 1983; Elliott is on pace for 1,875. Will Elliott break that 33-year-old mark? A "yes" bet pays 2/1; a "no" bet pays 1/3.

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Many, though not all hockey games, have a tipping point or pivotal moment that factors into the outcome.
Sometimes it’s obvious what it was and when the moment occurred. Other times, it’s overshadowed by something else on the ice.
Ask the Flyers which moment would define their come-from-behind 4-3 shootout victory over Buffalo on Tuesday and the response will be virtually unanimous: when Dmitry Kulikov leveled Jakub Voracek with a high hit that made contact to the head in the third period.
Voracek was forced off the ice under the NHL’s concussion protocol.
That hit incensed the Flyers, who went on to score two power-play goals and tie the game, 3-3. The comeback was on.
Yet there was a less obvious but significant point that happened late in the second period, and it concerned goalie Steve Mason.
Matt Moulson had given Buffalo a 3-0 lead on Michal Neuvirth at 15:43, when Flyers coach Dave Hakstol elected to make a goalie switch.
Rather than call a simple timeout to buy Mason some warm-up time and allow his team to collect itself on the bench, Hakstol challenged the goal, claiming “goalie interference.”
Replays won’t show any direct interference on the shot itself. Neuvirth was speared several seconds before the play developed.
Hakstol knew the goal would likely not be overturned, but his strategy was to buy time for Mason and his team. By using a challenge, he knew the review process would take a lot longer than the 60-second timeout.
Either way, he was going to use his only timeout.
“You know what, I think we needed a timeout at that time, anyway,” Hakstol said coyly. “Pretty low probability of it being successful. Everything worked out well in the end.”
Mason appreciated what his coach did, too. Buying extra time for you?
“Yeah, probably,” Mason replied. “Regardless of the situation, you’re sitting on the bench, you know? You’re not really gauged as much as when you’re playing, obviously. So, you just try and ramp things up as quickly as possible.”
Mason had two saves in that shortened period, five in the third period and one in the overtime to register his second victory.
“There’s a never-quit attitude in this room,” he said. “We showed in Chicago — we were just talking about that. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to close that one out.
“But guys have a belief that you get one [moment] and it comes. [Travis Konecny] got us going with his first NHL goal, which is great. The guys really pushed to capitalize on their chances.” ​