Sixers Host Toronto: Got Got to Get It

Sixers Host Toronto: Got Got to Get It

With the Sixers trailing the Celtics by 1.5 games in the Atlantic, they absolutely must win games like tonight's matchup with the Toronto Raptors if they want to have any shot at earning top honors in the division. Allow us to go on a couple of Toronto-related tangents for a minute here.

I'll say this about the FBI-relocated former Sixers' mascot Hip-Hop: if there was one thing I enjoyed about him it was when he sling-shotted himself into a bunch of trashcans or whatever they were and try to knock as many of them over like bowling pins. There was always the believability that he could actually hurt himself.

Alas, the Philadelphia 76ers are currently sans mascot, but the Toronto Raptors still have some monstrosity of a dinosaur that likes to try and rollerblade down steps while wearing an inflatable costume -- likely an even more laughable endeavor than using yourself as a bowling ball.

You've probably seen the infamous .GIF of him wiping out in tremendous fashion. The National Post uncovered the story behind this famous fall and it's wonderful. The Canadiens over at TBJ have my favorite take, "From the very first 'So he wanted to rollerblade down the stairs in the
inflatable costume' clause (WHY???), this is great. It puts everything
in perspective and finally answers the question of why the Raptor’s head
is so chompy. I had previously assumed it’s just because he is a hungry
dinosaur, but the deflation really makes sense."

...bear with me for a second on this transition here...

You know what doesn't make sense though? If Lou Williams can score so damn easily, why can't he defend at all? He knows what it takes to stop himself on the offensive end, so why can't he just do that to others at the defensive end?

Again via the Canucks at TBJ, from a Sports Illustrated piece on the Sixers' team-first style and their non-superstar star, Andre Iguodala.

“I learned from being a go-to guy what I didn’t like,”
Iguodala says. “Coaches tell you, ‘Get to the hole. Don’t settle for
jump shots.’ So when I guard somebody, I want them to settle for
jumpers—outside the paint but inside the three-point line—and then use
my length to contest late.” [...]

“It makes no sense to me why so many good scorers can’t defend,”
Iguodala says. “Like Lou Williams. He’s one of the toughest guys to
guard in the league, but he can’t guard anybody. I don’t get that.”

What's the deal with Lou Williams' defense?

7:00 pm tip from the Wells Fargo Center. Reaaally need to beat the Raptors or we're going to start to worry even more. Andre Iguodala, who was poked pretty harshly in the eye last night, is expected to start and wear goggles. Stylin' Dre.

Is Eagles' Carson Wentz the 'holy grail' of modern NFL QB prospects?

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Is Eagles' Carson Wentz the 'holy grail' of modern NFL QB prospects?

The NFL is constantly evolving, but pro offenses, their very design, and the types of athletes who can run those offenses are changing, rapidly beyond recognition.

That is precisely one of the reasons behind the Eagles' bold decision to trade three years worth of draft picks in April for the opportunity to get Carson Wentz out of North Dakota State. Because Wentz didn't represent merely another quarterback prospect coming out of college — some feel as though this 23-year-old kid might be the future of the position in the NFL.

Don't take my word for it. Take that of Brad Childress, former Eagles offensive coordinator who eventually wound up following long-time head coach Andy Reid to Kansas City. It's there where Childress was tasked with a unique role: "spread game analyst."

For more on that, what the spread offense is and how its prevalence in the college game is altering the landscape of the NFL, you'll have to read Kevin Clark's piece over at The Ringer. Trust us, it's worth it. Long-time Eagles executive Joe Banner hails the piece as, "One of the best, smartest, most correct articles I have read in a long time," and it's hard to argue. Chances are you'll learn something.

But for our purposes, the aspect of the piece we'll focus on is how the growth of the spread offense is tied to the selection of Wentz. NFL coaches like Childress or front-office types such as Eagles vice president of football operations Howie Roseman see in Wentz a rare hybrid of the the spread and pro-style quarterback, which as it turns out, may be ideally suited to succeed in a league that increasingly uses both types of offense.

Childress, meanwhile, believes the current holy grail is the prospect who ran spread plays at the college level that can be easily imported to the pro level. He mentioned Eagles rookie quarterback Carson Wentz, who at North Dakota State played in a multiple-style offense that incorporated spread concepts. Childress was impressed that Wentz played under center sometimes and in the shotgun at other times, and that regardless of the formation, he was adept at making various throws. He said some of the sweep plays Wentz ran were particularly impressive, and that he wants to incorporate what he saw into the Chiefs’ game plan.

Eagles executive vice president of football operations Howie Roseman, who took Wentz second overall in the draft, called his college system “a pro-style concept that hints at where the sport is going.” Roseman, like Spielman, said that changes in the college game have forced him to alter how he evaluates passers: Because the college game is so different from the NFL game, Roseman is forced to put less emphasis on tape and more emphasis on test scores and smarts.

It's an extremely interesting perspective. It also jives with another line of thinking many believe led the Eagles to jump all over Wentz: There may not be another college signal-caller with this type of makeup to come around for a long time, as more and more programs go to entirely spread-based systems.

Yes, concepts of the spread have made their way to the NFL, and they're likely there to stay. However, whether it will become an offense that's fully embraced around the league is a bit trickier, which is why it's probably best to have somebody who can do it all. That partially explains why Wentz became so attractive to the Eagles.

It's also not at all surprising that Childress, Reid, Roseman and current Eagles coach Doug Pederson would all share similar mindsets on the direction the NFL is headed. There are too many ties here for it to be purely a coincidence, and Clark's piece about the spread offense would seem to shed some light on some of the back story about how Wentz became an Eagle.

Experience a day in the life of Temple football's training camp

Experience a day in the life of Temple football's training camp

Before their classmates even stepped foot on campus, Temple football was going through what was possibly their toughest test of the season—three weeks of training camp.

Coach Matt Rhule and the Owls gave us a behind-the-scenes look at what the players and coaches go through during a day of camp in the video above. We were there through the meetings, meals and walk-thrus before the team eventually departed for the Phillies game. It was a 12 + hour day for the players, but with walk-thrus replacing actual practice, this particular day was considered a “light” one.

This Temple squad still have veteran leadership returning from last season, but they have to replace multiple NFL draft picks on defense. Everyone from seniors to freshmen will be looked upon to keep up the Owls' strong defense going (see story)

Rhule is in his fourth season as the Owls' head coach. After going 2-10 in his first season, Rhule has brought Temple to a 10-4 record a year ago, highlighted by an appearance in the AAC Championship Game and the Boca Raton Bowl. However, the Owls are already moving past their strong 2015 (see story).

For a look at Temple's training camp, check out the video above.

Charles Barkley weighs in on Zeke Elliott: 'all marijuana made me want to do was eat potato chips'

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Charles Barkley weighs in on Zeke Elliott: 'all marijuana made me want to do was eat potato chips'

Charles Barkley may have recently had his hip replaced but he hasn't let a little procedure slow him down. Well, slow his mouth down at least.

Sir Charles joined the 94 WIP morning show on Friday to chat with his old pal Howard Eskin.

The worst part about the hip replacement and need to use a walker for about six weeks?

“I can’t put my foot up your [butt] like I want to," Barkley told Eskin.

Their conversation was wide ranging: Olympics basketball, Cowboys RB Zeke Elliott being photographed in a marijuana shop in Seattle, his new show on TNT show "The Race Card," and anything else that came into his head.

They started off talking about Team USA and their gold medal in Rio. Sir Charles thinks they need more role players on that type of team.

"I thought they had too many ball-dominant guys. You need role players for that team to flow freely," Barkley said, pointing to DeAndre Jordan as one of the few guys on the team who played his role nicely without needing the ball.

Barkley would also love to see young players like Ben Simmons or even Nerlens Noel in the Olympics to make them more watchable.

Perhaps the funniest line of the interview came up when talking about Zeke Elliot being in a marijuana shop in Seattle where such a store is legal.

“That’s just stupid,” Barkley said.

“Come on, man. You gotta be smarter than that. I’m not a marijuana guy. I smoked pot like five times in my life. All it made me want to do was eat potato chips. It was like a waste of my time. I didn’t feel no euphoria it didn’t take me to no special place. I just said, ‘do we have any more potato chips in the state of Alabama or Pennsylvania.’”

The two briefly mentioned Barkley's new show on TNT which will focus a lot on race relations.

“Cops have made some mistakes but we need the cops," Charles said. "We as black people need to do a much better job at policing ourselves. It’s not like it’s a right or wrong answer, there are a lot of layers.”

It's interesting to hear Barkley talk about a nuanced issue. You don't typically hear Sir Charles consider things with more than an instant response.

And, finally, the interview ended with Chuck saying something we can all agree on after learning Eskin was flying out to Indiana for an Eagles preseason football game.

“Preseason football may be the greatest scam in the world today. What a waste of time.”

Yep.

Check out the podcast of Barkley's interview here.