So Glad Jrue Made the All-Star Game Instead of Those Other Dudes on Good Teams

So Glad Jrue Made the All-Star Game Instead of Those Other Dudes on Good Teams

When Golden State's David Lee was interviewed after a recent Warriors
win about the possibility of being honored with an All-Star nod, he said
that what would make the nomination so special was that it would come
because his team had played well, reflecting better on him by
comparison. Needless to say, this was not the case with our own Jrue
Holiday, but if I were him, I would find the honor of being chose in
spite of my team far more flattering and special than being honored
because of my team. If you're chosen as an All-Star when your team has a
16-24 record and hasn't won consecutive games since November, you must
have been really, really good this season.

Jrue Holiday has been really, really good this season. Better
than we would have thought, better than we could have expected, better
than we might've even hoped. He was put in just about every possible
position to flounder—given far more responsibility than he had in
previous years, but with far fewer weapons to work with—and still
managed to put up not just career numbers, but numbers nobody else in
the league is putting up. (The list of players averaging 19 points and
nine assists starts and ends with Jrue.) When watching him put in a
signature takeover performance during that game against the Raptors, I
posed the question (to myself) "Has watching Jrue this year been worth
having to watch the rest of the team?" I concluded that indeed, it had.

Jrue's numbers (and he's not just a numbers guy, he's damn
impressive to watch as well) have been good enough this year that his
All-Star candidacy should've been a no-brainer. But certain
coaches—let's call one of them D. Collins, for example—insist that when
choosing All-Stars, you work from the top of the standings down, and if
you come up with enough plausible candidates before you get to the 9th
and 10th seeds, tough luck for the guys on those lottery-bound teams.

And so candidates like Brooklyn's Deron Williams, Milwaukee's
Brandon Jennings, and especially New York's J.R. Smith were given
protracted consideration for All-Star status, with three of the four TNT
analysts choosing Smith to just one (Barkley, duh) going to bat for The
Damaja. No matter that all three's stats were easily inferior to
Holiday, that D-Will was so bad at the start of the year that his coach
basically got fired for it, and that Milwaukee and New York would gladly
trade either Jennings or Smith for Holiday in a heartbeat—these guys
were on teams with winning records, therefore they must have been
worthier than Holiday.

Thankfully, Jrue was the one who got the nod—along with the
Cavaliers' Kyrie Irving, who had an even worse record (but arguably an
even more impressive season) than Holiday. As happy as I was that Jrue
had been selected, it's nothing compared to how angry I would've been if
we were deprived of the One Good Thing that could've come out of the
Bynumless era of the 2012-13 76ers because coaches decided that other
dudes should be awarded for having better teammates. The TNT bros still
waxed infuriantingly rhapsodic about Smith's snub—et tu, Ernie
Johnson?—but whatever. Justice was done.

So for the second straight year, the Sixers have a first-time
All-Star. But more than Iguodala's selection last year—which, while not
undeserved, was certainly helped dramatically by the Liberty Ballers'
excellent first half to the season—this one really feels earned. The
Sixers have been awful to watch this year, but at least we have Jrue,
one of the best guys in the East, representing for us, making sure we
don't fade into total national anonymity as we wait for Bynum's legs to
grow back. We can't wait to see him running the fast break with Paul
George and getting backdoor feeds from Joakim Noah in Houston a couple
weeks from now.

Speedy WR Bryce Treggs getting reps with Eagles' starters, could debut soon

Speedy WR Bryce Treggs getting reps with Eagles' starters, could debut soon

Speedy Eagles receiver Bryce Treggs, who hasn’t yet been active for a game, could be soon.

Treggs said after practice Thursday he got more reps with the first-team offense this week than he has all year.

“Way more,” Treggs said. “I feel like they’re comfortable with me now, where they don’t have to tell me what to do. I know the plays and I know where to be.”

Does that mean Treggs will make his NFL debut against the Vikings Sunday? Not necessarily. But it does mean he’s at least on the Eagles’ radar.

Treggs began his rookie preseason with Chip Kelly and the 49ers but didn’t play during the preseason because of a preexisting knee injury.

When the 49ers released him as part of final cuts, the Eagles claimed him. He was cleared medically last month and has been gradually learning the Eagles’ offense since. He’s been on the 53-man roster all year but inactive for all five games.

Treggs has 4.31 speed and ranked eighth in NCAA Division I last year with 21.2 yards per catch as a senior at Cal.

Treggs potentially could give the Eagles something they’ve lacked all year: a deep threat.

The Eagles have connected on just eight pass plays of 25 yards or more this year, and only five NFL teams have fewer.

Jordan Matthews has four of those, and running back Darren Sproles has two, which leaves just two for the rest of the Eagles’ other wideouts — one for Nelson Agholor, one for Dorial Green-Beckham and none for Josh Huff.

The Eagles have been using Green-Beckham more and more each week — he played a season-high 42 snaps in the loss to the Redskins Sunday.

Agholor has been a disappointment, with just 16 catches for 181 yards this year, no catches over 35 yards and no catches of 20 yards since opening day. In 18 NFL games, the former first-round pick has never had 65 yards in a game.

Treggs said he feels comfortable with both outside spots and the slot and has gotten practice reps at all three spots this week.

Eagles Injury Update: Bennie Logan (groin) misses second straight practice

Eagles Injury Update: Bennie Logan (groin) misses second straight practice

Every injured Eagles player returned on Thursday except for one.

Defensive tackle Bennie Logan (left groin strain) missed practice for the second straight day on Thursday and it doesn't seem likely he'll be able to play on Sunday against the Vikings.

If Logan can't play on Sunday, backup Beau Allen will get the start.

"Bennie was playing well [against Washington]," defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz said on Thursday. "He was one of the few guys in this game that was playing well. You know, it will be more reps for guys like Beau [DT Beau Allen], and maybe even a little bit more for a guy like Fletch [DT Fletcher Cox]. We'd like to rotate those guys as much [as we can], but sometimes you're not able to. And then a guy like Destiny [DT Destiny Vaeao], who has been a part-time player and made a couple plays, but also he's given up a couple. He needs to be more consistent. We've also used some defensive ends inside the rush on third down. That helps alleviate a little bit."

While Logan was still out, several other key Eagles returned to practice after missing Wednesday: Jason Kelce (foot), Ron Brooks (calf) and Marcus Smith (groin). Brooks was the only limited participant in Thursday's practice.

Kelce missed Wednesday's practice because he got a cortisone shot on Monday.

Furthermore, several Eagles who were limited on Wednesday -- Jordan Matthews (knee), Allen Barbre (ankle), Mychal Kendricks (ribs) -- were full participants on Thursday.