Some Quick Stats About Jrue's Shooting Night for the Ages in Last Night's Miserable Sixers Loss

Some Quick Stats About Jrue's Shooting Night for the Ages in Last Night's Miserable Sixers Loss

You could be mad at me for promising in my pre-game column that you
could flip from tonight's potentially very depressing Phillies game (and
it was) to a Sixers game that would be no worse than slightly
depressing, since the Ballers did end up losing 88-83 to the NBA's worst
team in a basketball game after which everyone involved will spend
days, possibly weeks huddled in the corner of the shower crying out of
irreparable trauma. But I'd argue that tonight's game was far more funny
than depressing. I mean, really, when Jrue Holiday has a night where he
goes 2-24 from the field, it has to get funny at some point, right?


Oh, and that's not a typo, and it's definitely not an exaggeration.
Jrue Holiday made two baskets out of 24 attempts last night, for a grand
total of five points.

Sometime in the first quarter, Jrue
banked in a layup for an and-one, which he coverted. A whole lot of
minutes later, in the fourth quarter, he got his own rebound off a layup
attempt that sailed comically high off the backboard, putting it back
in.


In between, there were misses. Oh, were there misses.

There
were misses off the front iron. There were misses off the back iron.
There were misses that rolled around and dropped off. There were misses
that were halfway down and popped back out. There were clanked threes,
blown layups, and sprawling lane heaves that landed nowhere even close.
There were so many misses that two-thirds of the way through the
quarter, Collins brought in Evan Turner like a relief pitcher to run the
offense (which was very briefly productive but ultimately proved
unsustainable). Jrue must really, really be freaked out to be playing
with his brother—though it wasn't like Senior Holiday put much of a
hurting on the Bobcats either, going 1-5 for two points in his Sixer
debut.


Jrue would probably very much like to sweep this game under the rug
and let it never be spoken of again. We'll oblige him soon enough, but
before we do, some arguably fun stats about Jrue's night of two makes in
two dozen attempts.

 - Jrue's shooting percentage for the night was an incredible 7.7%, the lowest he's posted since he put up an 0-9 against the Mavs February of last year. His previous low for the season was the 12.5% (1-8 FG) he shot against the Clippers last week.

 - The shooting night lowers Jrue's season average from 44.1% from the field to 43.4%. Might not sound like a big drop, but when you've taken nearly 1200 shots for the season (as the Damaja has), it's really hard to cost your field goal average almost a whole percentage point in just one night's work.

 - Jrue's 22 missed shots last night was equal to the number of shots made by the entire Sixers starting lineup.

 - Jrue missed 22 of his 24 attempts last night. In his last four games combined, LeBron James has missed just 23 shots, in 67 attempts (279% more).

 - Jrue's 22 misses is easily the most missed field goals by a player who only made two field goals in a game this season—the next-closest being Raptors center Andrea Bargnani's 2-19 night against the Spurs. According to Basketball-Reference's Game Finder, no player since 1986 (where their records begin) has made exactly two field goals and missed as many times as Jrue did against the Bobcats, the closest thing being Sixer great Allen Iverson's 2-21 night against the Knicks back in 2004.

 -  Six players have posted a worse field goal percentage in a game this season in which they made at least one shot, however—the worst of which being Portland's Damien Lillard, who went 1-16 against the Magic in February.

 -  Only one other player this year has missed 22 field goals in a game, and he's done it three times. And if you needed more than two chances to guess that it was Kobe Bryant, you need to watch more NBA.

Good times!

Not to single out Jrue unnecessarily—everyone
has a bad game now and then, he's still young and learning, he was
probably still smarting from that barrage of make-up noogies Justin gave
him before the game, etc.—and it's not like anyone else on Philly was
that much better anyway, Thad going 2-9, Evan shooting 6-15 with five
turnovers, and so on. But man, if Jrue's performance last night doesn't
signify just how futile this Sixers season is getting...I don't think I
could take much more symbolism here.

Phils lose LHP in Rule 5 draft, exit winter meetings balancing present with future

Phils lose LHP in Rule 5 draft, exit winter meetings balancing present with future

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – The winter meetings ended Thursday morning with the Phillies sitting out the Rule 5 draft. The Phillies’ roster was at the 40-man limit and that prohibited the team from making a pick.

The Phils did lose one player in the draft as reliever Hoby Milner was selected by the Cleveland Indians. 

Milner, who turns 26 in January, is a left-hander who recently switched to a side-arm delivery. He had a 2.49 ERA in 49 games at Double A and Triple A in 2016.

Milner was eligible for the draft because he was not protected on the 40-man roster last month. The Indians selected him for $50,000. He must stay in the big leagues all season or be offered back to the Phillies for $25,000.

Andrew Pullin was a player the Phillies feared losing, but they hung on to the lefty-hitting outfielder. Pullin, 23, hit .322 with a .885 OPS between Single A and Double A in 2016. A late-season elbow injury prevented Pullin from playing in the Arizona Fall League and factored into the Phillies’ decision to leave him unprotected.

The Phillies selected one player, infielder Jorge Flores, in the minor-league phase of the draft. Flores had been in the Toronto system.

The Phils lost one player, 25-year-old pitcher Jairo Munoz, to Tampa Bay in the minor-league phase. Munoz pitched in the low minors in 2016.

With the winter meetings behind them, Phillies officials will head back to Citizens Bank Park to complete the construction of their 2017 roster. So far this winter, the Phils have re-signed starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson and added outfielder Howie Kendrick and relievers Joaquin Benoit, Pat Neshek and David Rollins.

Remaining on the Phillies’ to-do list is adding a backup infielder – Andres Blanco could return – and deciding whether to pursue a veteran hitter to play a corner outfield spot or give an opportunity to a young tandem such as Roman Quinn and Aaron Altherr. 

General manager Matt Klentak spoke often during the week about that balance he is trying to strike between improving the 2017 club while keeping intact long-range goals.

“Successfully balancing the present and the future is the single greatest challenge that a baseball operations department faces,” Klentak said. “We’ve talked about it all offseason. The decisions that we are making right now about giving playing time to a young player that has cut his teeth in Triple A and needs that opportunity to take the next step as opposed to a shorter-term solution from the outside – that’s one of the main challenges that we’ve run into this offseason.”

Time will tell which way the Phillies go on this matter. 

Even with Jordan Matthews' return, Paul Turner still in Eagles' plans

Even with Jordan Matthews' return, Paul Turner still in Eagles' plans

There were just two things on Paul Turner’s mind as he sprinted across the field early during the third quarter on Sunday, anticipating his first career NFL catch. 

Turner relayed them on Wednesday: 

1. “Make sure you get in [Carson Wentz’s] vision.” 

2. “You better catch this ball.” 

He did both. 

Turner, the 23-year-old undrafted receiver from Louisiana Tech, who has become a fan favorite since his stellar training camp and preseason, caught his first NFL pass during Sunday’s loss to the Bengals and it went for a big gain of 41 yards. 

On his first catch, the Eagles used the play-action to tilt the defense and Wentz threw a dart into a small window to hit Turner on an over route. Then, the rookie turned upfield with a ton of space in front of him. 

By the end of the afternoon, he caught six balls for 80 yards. It was the best receiving day for an Eagles rookie since Jordan Matthews in 2014 and was a better day than last year’s first-round pick, Nelson Agholor, has ever had. 

“It's always good to catch a few balls,” said Turner, who has been on the 53-man roster and active for just the past two games. “It gets your motor going and gets your confidence going. It just gets you more into the game and gets you excited. I think it does a lot for a person's confidence.”

Turner played 41 snaps against the Bengals in large part because Matthews was out with an ankle injury. Matthews predominantly plays in the slot, which is where head coach Doug Pederson and his coaching staff like Turner. 

“Honestly, that wasn't really my mindset going into the game,” Turner said when asked if he knew how much opportunity he’d have with Matthews out. “My mindset was to go in there and if my number was called, just go out there and make a play. Even if my number was called, just take care of my assignment and take care of the little details and I knew everything else would just take care of itself. I knew that if I got the ball, I'd be excited. But even if I didn't, just to go out there and just block, and give up myself for my teammates. That was my goal coming into the game and just try to stay focused on that.” 

It appears as though Turner has done enough to warrant keeping his playing time. As Matthews returned to practice on Wednesday — as a limited participant — Pederson said there will still be opportunities for Turner. 

“There are, there are,” Pederson said. “And these are things we talked about the last couple of days as a staff — getting Paul in there, even with Jordan coming back. I think it can be a benefit to the offense to have both of those guys ready to go.”

The Eagles still haven’t had more than four receivers active for any game this season. During the last two weeks when Turner has played, either Agholor or Matthews were out. 

“It means a lot that the coaching staff has confidence in me,” Turner said. “My biggest thing is just to come in here and just work each and every day in practice and just prepare in practice so I'm prepared when I go out there in the game.”