Ten Biggest Questions for the Sixers' Off-Season: #5. What Free Agents Should We Go After?

Ten Biggest Questions for the Sixers' Off-Season: #5. What Free Agents Should We Go After?

For the first time in what feels like decades (and what is actually a half-decade), the Sixers are going to have cap space the summer. Finally free of the inhibiting contracts of Andre Iguodala (traded) and Elton Brand (amnestied + expired), the Sixers can finally be players in free agency once again. Now, just because we'll be subtracting the gargantuan salaries of those two players, that doesn't mean we'll have their weight in cap space to spend this summer--most estimates have the Sixers ending up with about $12 mil in cap space, once their own free agents are renounced--but there'll be enough to add a couple small pieces, or perhaps even one big-ish piece.

[10 Biggest Questions: 10. What are we now and where are we going? | 9. Is Thad Young untouchable? | 8. Is Spencer Hawes good enough for our starting Center? | 7. Are any of our mid-level FAs worth re-signing? | 6. What players are worth trading for?]

Which free agents might we haul in with our newfound pocket change? Well, you could argue that the best strategy would be not to sign anyone at all, but to use that space to facilitate another blockbuster deal (like the Bynum one last year, but with hopefully less depressing results), or to roll it over for future years and even bigger free-agent targets. But assuming they're going for it this year--and assuming re-signing the Funny-Looking Kid with the Big Hair doesn't pan out--here's some of the dudes I'd be looking at, breaking it into the Sixers' three biggest areas of needs (Backup Point Guard/Third Guard, Wing Scorer/Shooter, and Big Man.

Backup Point Guard / Third Guard:

Practical:

Will Bynum (Detroit Pistons). Sixer fans may be familiar with Bynum, the Pistons' pint-sized backup point, for some of the fine games he's had against Philly, including a 22-point, six-assist outing he had in the second-to-last Sixers game of the season, a Pistons win. That's not every game for Bynum--there are plenty of 2-6, five point-type outings for him--but he can take over a game like that, and had pretty good averages on the season for Detrtoit (about ten points and four assists off the bench on 47% shooting, and a fine 16.6 PER). He's not a great defender, but he'd instantly slot in as our best bench creator, and would probably only cost us three or four million a year, given his low national profile and veterang age (30).

Aaron Brooks (Houston Rockets). Brooks has had a weird career, going from being named Most Improved Player for the Rockets in 2010 (a year where he averaged nearly 20 points a game and led the league with 209 threes made) to spending the lockout year in China and signing with the Kings last off-season, to getting cut and ending up back with the Rockets, filling in minutes after the injury to starting point Jeremy Lin. Brooks has a team option this year which very well may be declined, given that the Rockets already have two point guards (Lin and backup Patrick Beverly--Brooks only played 67 total minutes during the regular season) and are looking to keep their cap space clear for a max free agent.

Brooks showed during the playoffs that he could at least still get to the basket, and though his numbers weren't great (five points a game on 38% shooting), he'd be a cheap upside play for the Sixers this off-season, only costing them a million or two for a guy who was a borderline All-Star just a couple seasons ago and is still just 28 years old.

Swing For the Fences:

Nate Robinson (Chicago Bulls). A veteran's minimum signee with the Bulls for this season, KryptoNate has most likely made himself a lot of money this post-season, where he's been by far the best scorer (over 17 ppg, nearly 50% shooting) for a super-undermanned Bulls team that upset a much more talented Nets team in the first round, and has stolen at least one game from the juggernaut Miami Heat in the second round. (If you missed his Game Four performance from that Nets series, you missed a true classic.) Now that you know he can do it for a winning team, you look at Nate's numbers for the year--13 points a game and four assists a game, over 40% shooting from three, a 17.4 PER--and think there's no reason why he can't be one of the league's most valuable sixth men.

The Sixers could certainly use a guy like that--not to mention to fill in the Swag department, which will undoubtedly be hurting with the loss of Nick Young--and it might be worth five or six million, if we could get Nate on just a one-or-two-year deal, and had a defensive-minded enough roster to cover for his obvious deficiencies on the other end of the court.

Jerryd Bayless (Memphis Grizzlies). Bayless has a team option with the Grizzlies for $3 mil next year, but like Robinson, he's probably made himself enough coin with his post-season play--just nine points on 38% shooting for the Grizz, but some big shots on a team that could very well make it all the way to the finals--that he might see what his value is on the open market instead. With enough size to play some minutes at the two as well, Bayless would be just an about an ideal third guard for the Sixers, and at just 25 years old next year, he might even have some remaining untapped upside.

He might get a Lou Williams-type deal for some team this off-season, and if so, that shouldn't be the Sixers. But again, for five or six a year over a one/two-year contract, he could be a steal.

Also Worth Considering:

Rodrigue Beaubois (Mavericks), CJ Watson (Nets), Eric Maynor (Blazers)

Wing Scorer / Shooter:

Practical:

Chase Budinger (Minnesota Timberwolves). Perhaps best known as the last white Slam Dunk Contest participant of recent years, Chase Budinger has also been a reliable three-point threat from the wing for the Houston Rockets (40% from deep two seasons ago) since being drafted in the second round in 2009. He started off having a fine year for the Timberwolves in '12-'13, but like just about everybody else on that team, quickly got hurt, missing most of the season and ending with mediocre numbers for the year. He could be a nice fit on the Sixers, though, still young (25 next year) and potentially a solid weapon for Jrue both in transition and in the half-court, likely for just $3 or 4 mil a year.

Chris Copeland (New York Knicks). A 28-year-old rookie with the Knicks this year, Copeland absolutely exploded in the second half of the season, scoring 30 points in back-to-back games for the 'Bockers in their final contests of the year. Cope's exceedingly limited minutes this post-season show that perhaps Coach Woodson trusts him a lot more in garbage time than in playoff action, but I watched a lot of those Knick games and was very impressed with the rookie's scoring ability, both in the post and from the wing, and think he could really help a team like ours that really struggles to score the ball in the half-court. For the couple mil a year he'd cost as an unproven rookie of veteran age, he'd be an interesting signing for the Ballers.

Swing for the Fences:

OJ Mayo (Dallas Mavericks). Mayo's obvious talent and inability to put it all together tantalized and frustrated the Grizzlies for four years, and just as it seemed he'd finally taken that next step with the Mavericks last season, starting the season as the league's deadliest three-point shooter and averaging over 20 a game for a couple months, he started regressing again, and ended with numbers close to his career averages. But he still averaged 15 a game and shot 41% from three, and he's still just 25, so if he opts out of his Dallas deal, you can bet some team is gonna make O.J. Mayo their big off-season signing.

I still believe in Juice, and think he'd be a hell of a back-court compliment to Jrue Holiday, so if we could get him for anything close to the $4 mil that the Mavs got him for last year, I'd be very intrigued. Less so if it takes $8-10 a year, though.

J.J. Redick (Milwaukee Bucks). Though he disappeared a little after getting traded to the Bucks mid-season, Redick had a career year as the best scorer on the rebuilding Magic, averaging 15 a game on 45% shooting and 39% from deep. He'll make a good deal of money as some team's Poor Man's Ray Allen this off-season, and that could be the Sixers, considering he fills a rather desperate outside-shooting need for them, though his upside at age 28 is likely tapped, and as the Bucks discovered this season, his acquisition doesn't exactly put your team over the top in terms of playoff contention.

Also Worth Considering:

Wesley Johnson (Phoenix Suns), Matt Barnes (L.A. Clippers)

Big Man:

Practical:

Brandan Wright (Dallas Mavericks). Wright is a classic high-efficiency, low-volume big man, posting an incredible 21.0+ PER for the Mavericks each of the last two seasons (higher than 20 is usually considered All-Star-caliber), but only playing 18 minutes a game, since his slight frame at 6'9", 205, has left him vulnerable against more bruising post players. Still, that efficiency is intriguing, and he posted the best scoring numbers of his career last year (about eight a game on near-60% shooting), and for a team so badly lacking in post offense of any kind, the long, talented Wright would be a low-risk--probably also in the four/five-mil range--high-reward venture.

Tyler Hansbrough (Indiana Pacers). Tyler's not a center by any stretch of the imagination, but he would be our best bench rebounder, foul-drawer and general opponent-irritant since Reggie Evans was traded to Toronto four years ago. He's been just about the entire bench offense for the Pacers the last season or two, and though that's not saying a ton given how crappy their bench is, it shows how valuable he can be, and given that the Sixers haven't had an energy guy like that in so long, he'd be a valuable (and likely fan-beloved, though rival-hated) addition to our rotation.

Swing for the Fences:

Al Jefferson (Utah Jazz). The most frequently mentioned big fish for the Sixers to land this off-season is probably Jefferson, an exceedingly reliable post scorer for the Utah Jazz. A 50% shooter who averages in the high teens per game, Jefferson would instantly be our best big-man scorer in decades, and our best rebounder for some time as well, traditionally grabbing nine-to-ten a contest. He'll be 29 next season, and he's already fairly plodding on defense, so he's not the young, two-way star the Sixers really need, but he'll probably only cost in the $10-12 mil-a-year range, and for All-Star-caliber production in an area of desperate need for Philly, that's not too bad.

Andray Blatche (Brooklyn Nets). Like Wright, Blatche has proven himself an unexpectedly high-efficiency big man, scoring ten a game on over 50% shooting with a sky-high 21.9 PER for the Nets this season, his first on a winning ballclub. Like Wright, Blatche doesn't get a ton of minutes--just 19 a game off the bench for the Nets--and unlike Wright, Blatche comes with serious maturity red flags from his days of questionable behavior with the Washington Wizards. But Blatche has proven to be one of the league's most gifted big-man scorers, and hit some huge shots in the playoffs for Brooklyn, though with some huge defensive lapses in that Game Seven to go along with them. An intriguing proposition, if he can be got for $6 or 7 mil a year.

Also Worth Considering: DeJuan Blair, Tiago Splitter (San Antonio Spurs)

Conclusion:

I'm still down on the Al Jefferson move, since that would take up all our cap space and likely leave the Sixers in no better a spot than they were two or three years ago. As two young guys still getting at least a little bit better, I would like to see the team at least feel out the market on Bayless and Mayo, and if they're not picking up anything but scraps, I do think that Budinger, Bynum (the other one), Hansbrough and possibly even Wright could really help this team. But again, sing it with me now: It all depends on what happens with Andrew Bynum, who might re-sign a max or near-max deal for Philly this summer and make all this moot. Another discussion for another day, however.

MLB Notes: Rangers' Rougned Odor's suspension reduced to 7 games

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MLB Notes: Rangers' Rougned Odor's suspension reduced to 7 games

ARLINGTON, Texas -- Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor started serving his suspension Friday for punching Toronto's Jose Bautista after the penalty was reduced from eight to seven games.

Odor was out of the lineup for the series opener against Pittsburgh. He will be eligible to return June 4 when Texas is home against Seattle.

Bautista was suspended one game, and he was serving that Friday, when the penalty was upheld a day after his appeal was heard.

The Rangers promoted former top prospect Jurickson Profar from Triple-A Round Rock, and he was in the lineup against the Pirates as the leadoff hitter playing second base. Odor had been leading off.

Odor's penalty was cut by Major League Baseball special assistant John McHale Jr. The appeal over Odor's role in a May 15 brawl between the Rangers and Blue Jays was heard Tuesday. The league disciplined 14 players and staff over the melee in Arlington (see full story).

Red Sox: Struggling RHP Clay Buchholz to bullpen
TORONTO -- Struggling Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz is being moved to the bullpen and left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez will take Buchholz's spot in the rotation, starting Tuesday at Baltimore.

Buchholz is 2-5 with a 6.35 ERA in 10 starts and has allowed five earned runs or more six times. He gave up season-highs of six runs and three home runs in Thursday's 8-2 loss to Colorado.

Rodriguez (right knee) is on the 15-day DL has not pitched for the Red Sox this season. He's 0-3 with a 3.54 ERA in five rehab starts at Triple-A Pawtucket. He went 10-6 with a 3.85 ERA as a rookie in 2015.

Buchholz has made two career relief appearances, one in his rookie season in 2007 and another in 2008.

Manager John Farrell said Buchholz will make multi-inning appearances in order to remain stretched out and could return to the rotation later in the season.

NBA Playoffs: Cavs blow out Raptors for second straight Finals appearance

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NBA Playoffs: Cavs blow out Raptors for second straight Finals appearance

BOX SCORE

TORONTO -- LeBron James scored 33 points, Kevin Love had 20 points and 12 rebounds, and the Cleveland Cavaliers advanced to their second straight NBA Finals by beating the Toronto Raptors 113-87 in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals Friday night.

It's the third finals appearance in team history for the Cavaliers. Cleveland lost to Golden State in six games last year and got swept by San Antonio in 2007.

For James, it's his sixth straight trip to the finals, including four with Miami. He broke the 30-point barrier for the first time this postseason and finished with 11 rebounds and six assists.

"We needed LeBron to set the tone for us early and I thought he did that," coach Tyronn Lue said.

James will be the eighth player in NBA history to appear in six consecutive finals and the first who didn't play for the Boston Celtics.

"He's just a great player," Lue said. "He's a proven winner. He's always won over the course of his career. To go to six straight finals is unbelievable."

James got there by taking down a Toronto team that set a franchise record with 56 wins and reached the conference finals for the first time in 21 seasons.

After a second-quarter dunk, James shared some verbal barbs with rapper Drake, the Raptors' global ambassador and the man who popularized the nickname `6ix' for Toronto.

Kyrie Irving had 30 points and J.R. Smith added 15 for the Cavaliers, who will face the winner of the Golden State-Oklahoma City series on Thursday.

Cleveland would open at home against the Thunder but would be on the road against the 73-win Warriors, who trail 3-2 against Oklahoma City heading into Saturday's Game 6.

The Cavs will be seeking to end Cleveland's 52-year championship drought, the longest by any city with at least three professional teams. No Cleveland team has won it all since the Browns blanked Baltimore 27-0 to win the NFL championship in 1964.

"This city has been craving a championship," Lue said. "We have the right team and we have the right talent."

Kyle Lowry scored 35 points and DeMar DeRozan had 20 as the deepest playoff run in Raptors team history ended, much to the disappointment of a sellout crowd of 20,605 dressed in red and white T-shirts that formed a maple leaf pattern on either side of the court. Fans stood and cheered "Let's go, Raptors! Let's go, Raptors!" throughout most of the final three minutes.

Raptors coach Dwane Casey said reaching the conference finals was "a tremendous learning experience" for his young team, one that's "a step ahead" in its process of becoming a championship contender.

"We're learning," Casey said. "We're not where (the Cavaliers) are right now. We're going to be."

A dejected Lowry said it was hard to see the positive side of Toronto's best season ever.

"Of course you're going to look back at some point but right now I'm disappointed," he said. "Simple as that, I'm disappointed."

Toronto prolonged the series with back-to-back home wins in Games 3 and 4 but never mounted much of a challenge to the conference champions in Game 6, falling behind by 21 in the third quarter.

The Cavaliers came in 0-4 at Air Canada Centre counting the regular season and playoffs, but looked much more like the team that handed the Raptors a trio of lopsided losses in Cleveland this series.

The Raptors trailed 88-78 on a jumper by DeRozan with 10:23 remaining but James scored six points in a 14-3 run that gave the Cavs a 102-81 lead with about 6 minutes left.

James scored 14 in the first and five of Cleveland's nine field goals were from long range as the Cavaliers led 31-25 after one.

After video review, the officials waved off a basket by Biyombo with 3:18 left in the period and gave him a flagrant foul for knocking down Love.

Tempers flared again early in the second when Richard Jefferson reacted angrily to catching an elbow from Jonas Valanciunas as the two battled for a rebound. Patrick Patterson came over and shoved Jefferson out of the way. Both Patterson and Jefferson were given technical fouls.

Cleveland made five more 3-pointers in the second and outscored Toronto 9-3 over the final 71 seconds to lead 55-41 at halftime. The Cavaliers made 10 of 15 3-point attempts in the first half, while Toronto was 2 of 12.

The Cavs led 78-57 after a 3 by Love at 3:53 of the third but Lowry scored 15 points as Toronto closed the quarter with a 17-8 run, cutting it to 86-74.

Tip-ins
Cavaliers: Shot 17 for 31 from 3-point range. ... Outscored Toronto 17-5 in fast break points.

Raptors: Finished their playoff run by playing every other day from April 29 onward, a 15-game run that started with Game 6 of the first round against Indiana.

NFL Notes: Jets' offer to QB Ryan Fitzpatrick stands at 3 years

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NFL Notes: Jets' offer to QB Ryan Fitzpatrick stands at 3 years

NEW YORK -- A person familiar with the negotiations says the New York Jets made a three-year offer to quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick in March that includes $12 million guaranteed in the first year.

That offer has remained on the table for Fitzpatrick, according to the person who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because neither side is commenting publicly on the negotiations.

The New York Post first reported the terms of the offer Friday.

Fitzpatrick and the Jets have been locked in a contract stalemate. The 33-year-old quarterback is a free agent and coming off a season in which he threw a Jets-record 31 touchdown passes and led New York within a victory of the playoffs.

Both the Jets and Fitzpatrick have said they would like a reunion, but have unable to agree on a deal.

Bears: First-round pick Leonard Floyd agrees to deal
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- The Chicago Bears and first-round draft pick Leonard Floyd have agreed to a four-year contract with an option for a fifth year.

The Bears drafted the outside linebacker from Georgia with the ninth pick after trading up two spots in a deal with Tampa Bay. Chicago hopes he will add some athleticism to a team trying to build on a 6-10 season. The 6-foot-6, 244-pound Floyd led the Bulldogs in sacks for the third straight year with 4 , and tied for the team lead with 10 1/2 tackles for loss last season.

With the announcement Friday, the Bears have agreed to contracts with eight of their nine picks. Defensive end Jonathan Bullard, a third-rounder, is the exception.

NFL: Navy's Reynolds, Carter can defer military service
ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- Keenan Reynolds will get his chance to play in the NFL this season.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Friday that the record-setting Navy quarterback Reynolds and fullback Chris Swain can defer their military service to play in the NFL.

Carter made the announcement during his graduation speech to the academy in Annapolis. As students cheered the news about their graduating classmates, Carter said: "Go get 'em."

Reynolds was drafted in the sixth round by the Baltimore Ravens. He is the NCAA's career leader in touchdowns with 88. He had 31 touchdown passes while leading Navy's triple-option offense. The Ravens plan to use him as a running back, receiver and kick returner.

Swain has signed with the San Diego Chargers (see full story).

Redskins: Activists criticize poll on team name
WASHINGTON -- Native American leaders and activists have criticized a recent US national poll that found nine of 10 Native Americans aren't offended by the Washington Redskins' name.

On a conference call held Friday by the National Congress of American Indians and "Change the Mascot" campaign, panelists voiced opposition to a Washington Post poll that surveyed 504 Native Americans, 90 percent of whom said the name doesn't bother them.

James Fenelon, a California State San Bernardino sociology professor, called the poll "immoral," adding it was not representative of Native American communities. Amanda Blackhorse, lead plaintiff in the trademark case against the Redskins, said the "misguided" poll will not affect attempts to change the name.

National Congress of American Indians Executive Director Jackie Pata said: "This issue is not about polling. This issue is about human rights."

D.C. council member David Grosso said he hadn't been swayed and that the government would not support the team moving back into the District unless the name was changed.

The team currently plays its home games in Maryland, with its headquarters and training facility in Virginia.