Thad Out For 'A While:' What Do We Do Now?

Thad Out For 'A While:' What Do We Do Now?

night's game against the Magic was about as unenjoyable as a 17-point
win can be—not only was the game an unwatchable affair against a crappy
team's JV squad (any win by less than 40 would've felt at least a little
underwhelming), but the Sixers lost Thaddeus Young in the second
quarter with what has since been identified as a left hamstring sprain.
No specific timetable has been given on Thad's return—coach Doug Collins
says he'll be out "a while"—but based on the returns of players like
Manu Ginobili and Luol Deng from similar recent injuries, it'll probably
be at least ten days, maybe about two weeks until we see Thad suiting
up again. (Unless it's a full tear of the hamstring, in which case the prognostication becomes a lot more dramatic.)

Regardless, this is a tough loss for a team ostensibly in the playoff
hunt—with their win against the Magic, the Sixers again move to three
back of the eighth-place Celtics, though those guys have won four in a
row and look poised to continue surging, even with a couple
season-ending injuries to key players. Thad has been the Sixers'
second-most valuable player this season and probably their best
all-around contributor, leading the team in rebounds, steals and field
goal percentage—an extremely odd package of stat-stuffing that speaks to
Thad's versatility as a player. By the all-encompassing but extremely
imprecise "Win Shares" statistic, Thad is easily tops on the team, his
4.4 Wins Added a full 1.5 wins better than Jrue Holiday, second on the
team with 2.9. He will be missed, whatever time he's out.

In a way, though, this is probably the best time of the year for
Thad to go down, especially if it is gonna be just a two-week injury.
That period should overlap the All-Star Break, a period where the Sixers
go a full week without playing, and even Thad misses two weeks, that's
just four games total that he'll have to sit out. If he comes back
shortly after that, his return should also come in time to be present
for the Funny Looking Kid With the Big Hair's Sixers debut, whenever
that is—the latest update now has him coming back in "February," a
typically FLKWB-esque update that's simultaneously encouraging and
discouraging—and at that point, of course, it will be critical for the
frontcourt pair to get as much time playing together, and with Evan and
Jrue in the back, as possible, to see what kind of potential this team's
young core has together.

If this is a full tear, though, and Thad is out for two months (as Howard Eskin predicts he would be),
that's bad. Even if our long-promised All-Star center comes back after
the Break as once anticipated, making a playoff push without Young would
be a tremendous challenge, and one I imagine the team probably isn't up
for. Thad has replaced Iguodala as the Liberty Baller who does all the
little things and whose contributions you can't even fully appreciate
until he's out, and then you realize "Oh yeah, it was nice how he dove
for all those loose balls, finished on the fast break, bodied up that
opposing power forward, and such." He'll get an MRI today, which should
tell us how bleak the outlook is for young Thad.

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The Philly fan who gave Russell Westbrook double bird said he was called fat

The Philly fan who gave Russell Westbrook double bird said he was called fat

Philly fans have a bad reputation. This isn't going to change anytime soon.

Regardless of which side of the Philly fan debate you fall, you'd probably agree fans shouldn't give the double bird mere feet from the athletes who are playing in front of them.

You've almost assuredly seen it by now, the image and footage of a Sixers fan flipping off Russell Westbrook last night in the highly-anticipated season debut. He was subsequently removed from his seats by security.

The New York Post got to the bottom of it all and even tracked down the fan's response on Facebook:

Dr. Richard Harkaway, a Philadelphia urologist who is originally from Long Island, wrote that it was Westbrook who initiated the confrontation, which ended with Harkaway being tossed from the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia during the 76ers’ season-opening loss.

“To all my FB friends who are seeing a picture of me on the Internet giving the finger to Russell Westbrook. Actually two fingers,’’ Harkaway wrote in a private post. “Not as simple as it seems. I love to scream at the players and anyone who has been to a game with me knows this. Part of my charm. What you may not have seen on any of the video clips is what started the whole thing, which was Russell Westbrook saying ‘sit down f—ing fat boy’ when I stood up to boo.”

Do two wrongs make a right? Probably not. Being rude is being rude.

Do you think this fan's actions were justified after reading his response on Facebook?

Freddy Galvis, Odubel Herrera Gold Glove finalists at SS, CF

Freddy Galvis, Odubel Herrera Gold Glove finalists at SS, CF

Two Phillies are in the running for a 2016 Rawlings Gold Glove.

Shortstop Freddy Galvis and centerfielder Odubel Herrera were named National League finalists at their position on Thursday. Winners will be announced on Nov. 9. Galvis and Herrera are both finalists for the first time.

Galvis joins San Francisco’s Brandon Crawford, a Gold Glove winner in 2015, and the Chicago Cubs’ Addison Russell as finalists at shortstop.

Herrera is a finalist in center field along with Cincinnati’s Billy Hamilton and Atlanta’s Ender Inciarte.

Galvis, who turns 27 in November, committed himself to improving his defense after making 17 errors in 2015 and he did that with a career season in the field in 2016. He led all NL shortstops with a .987 fielding percentage and made just eight errors in 625 total chances while earning praise from Phillies’ infield guru Larry Bowa.

Galvis led the NL with 153 starts at shortstop and had errorless streaks of 51 and 44 games. At the plate, he reached career highs in doubles (26), homers (20), extra-base hits (49) and RBIs (67). On the down side, Galvis hit just .241 and his .274 on-base percentage was the worst in the majors.

Herrera, who turns 25 in December, began his career as an infielder in the Texas system and completed just his second season in the outfield in 2016. His credentials for a Gold Glove are not nearly as good as Galvis’. Herrera’s nine errors were the second-most among major-league outfielders, but he had 11 assists, fourth-most among NL outfielders.

The Phillies selected Herrera in the Rule 5 draft in 2014. They selected Inciarte in the Rule 5 draft in 2012 and he opened the 2013 season on the Phils’ roster, but was shipped back to his original club, Arizona, during the first week of that season.