Thad Young's Big Night Not Enough to Beat Carmelo and the Knicks

Thad Young's Big Night Not Enough to Beat Carmelo and the Knicks

There's nothing quite like watching your team
come back from a 19-point defecit to take the lead. Except maybe
watching your team come back from a 19-point defect to take the lead and
keep it. The Sixers put together a remarkable fourth quarter on
Wednesday night had the Knicks on their heels late. The mixed crowd of
18,000+ at the Wells Fargo Center was literally on its feet with every
possession down the stretch. Then Carmelo Anthony hit a dagger three
ball with under a minute to play, and the wretched showing of the first
three quarters came rushing back to the front of your memory.

"The fourth quarter, that's the way we play 'D,'" Elton Brand said of
the final frame. "That's our team right there. We had two or three
24-second violations by them. We got after it, we got stops, and we got
on the break. That's our team."

That's the Sixers team when they're clicking. Unfortunately, it took 36 minutes before the Sixers found their juice.

Thad Young was a huge part of the turnaround, doing it on both ends, bringing some much needed energy.

"Coach looked to me and said that he needed some energy out of me,"
Thad said after the game. "I said 'Okay, I got you.' That's pretty much
what I did. I tried to be active, try to be all over the place, try to
force turnovers, and try to be out on the break."

Young finished with a team high 25 points off the bench, but also did
an impressive job defending Amar'e Stoudemire, keeping him out of the
paint and forcing him to beat the Sixers with his jumper.

"Thad is a wonder to play with," Elton Brand said of Thad's
remarkable evolution. "He scores. He played defense great on A'mare and
took that challenge straight up. When he plays like that, we're gonna be
hard to beat."

Thad and Elton certainly carried them tonight. Brand's big 11 for 16
shooting was good for 24 points, but aside from him and Thad, the rest
of the team couldn't get the ball to go down.

They shot an ugly 2-18 from three point range, and as Coach Collins
said after the game, you hit a couple more of those and you win.

"You're up one and toilet bowl a three to put you up four late in the
game," Coach Collins said of a huge would-be three by Jodie Meeks that
could have had the Knicks packing it in and hopping on the bus back to
New York.

It didn't drop, and Carmelo hit a well-defended three ball at the
other end that you simply can't help but shake your head at. New York
hit tough threes while the Sixers missed some open looks from behind the
arc. Ballgame.

The Knicks took this battle, and their throngs of spray-tanned,
spikey-haired fans that showed up enjoyed every minute of it. The Sixers
learned they can't simply play one quarter of balls-to-the-wall
basketball to win against good teams. Especially in games with
playoff-like intensity.

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Wentz had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”