The Philadelphia 76ers Won a Professional Basketball Game Last Night

The Philadelphia 76ers Won a Professional Basketball Game Last Night

We needed this one. Not in terms of the standings or the "playoff race"
that doesn't really exist at this point, no matter how you try to
pretend in your post-game interview Molly Sullivan, but just in terms of
the Sixers fanbase needing to watch this Sixers team play 48 minutes of
basketball without wanting to go suck on an exhaust pipe. After seven
straight losses, after a Coach Collins meltdown, after the Funny-Looking
Kid With the Big Hair giving us yet another round of further
discouraging news, we needed a reason to continue to give a shit about
this team, for this season and the ones to follow. Tankfest '13 could
hold for one game—we needed to see some good basketball, dammit.

Well,
last night against the Golden State Warriors, we finally got it. The
Warriors took a 16 point lead in the second quarter, and it looked like
it was gonna be another one of those games where a playoff team just
runs over the 76ers at home. But the Sixers actually managed to fight
back to make it a game at the half—thanks, unexpectedly, to some good
outside shooting, particularly from Dorell Wright and a red hot Royal
Ivey—and then Evan Turner and Jrue Holiday took over in the second half,
outplaying Golden State's own star tandem of young perimeter players,
Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, down the stretch. (Klay and Steph still
finished with a combined 59 points and ten made threes, but no matter.)


It was the type of game we haven't seen from the Sixers in
forever—one where they win because their good young players all play
well. Jrue was extremely sloppy with the ball early, with five TOs in
the first half alone (eight on the game), but his shot was falling all
night, and he made some big buckets (a couple on strong drives to the
basket) in the final minutes to put the game out of reach for Golden
State. The Damaja's shooting in general has just been incredible
lately—over his last five games, he's averaging nearly 22 points on
about 53% shooting, 46% from deep, upping his season averages to 46% and
36%, respectively, excellent numbers for such a high-usage player as
Jrue.

The guy who won this game for us, though, was Evan Turner.
It's been a while since Evan had one of those games that made you go
"As frustrating as he is, we just can't give up on this guy yet,"
but he certainly had one last night, putting up 22 points (on 10-15
shooting!) to go with ten rebounds, nine assists and just two turnovers,
very possibly his best game of the season. He did everything, even
connecting on a pair of threes—his first made bombs since the month of
January, sadly—and coming one rolled-out Thad layup away from posting
the first triple-double of his career. In the third quarter, he
absolutely changed the game with his aggressiveness, and as is sometimes
the case with Evan, you could feel him getting stronger and more
confident with each made jumper, each inspired pass. (His alley-oop to
Arnett Moultrie in the third was a sight for sore eyes for any number of
reasons.)

It's been a while since Jrue and Evan had games this
good simultaneously—the two haven't scored 20 points in the same game
since January 26th against the Knicks, and have only done it four times
total all season. But getting games like this from the two guys that
were supposed to be the foundation of the team's future—plus a very
strong 14-point, 16-rebounds game from Thaddeus Young, even if he did
blow the layup to give Turner the trip-dub—reminds us that amidst all
the tanking, there is still something worth saving within this team,
something vaguely resembling hope for the future. It's enough to keep us
going, at least for a little while.

After the win, Dougie
embraced some of his players with such emotion and relief, you'd think
they just won a grueling seven-game playoff series together. Not quite,
but perhaps they themselves were reminded with the win tonight that
there was something worth fighting for with the Philadelphia 76ers. The
road up ahead is a long one–they play four of their next five on the
road, three against playoff teams—and they're still probably better off
losing more of those games than they win. But without a game like last
night's, they might not have even been able to play out the string in
the City of Brotherly Love without turning on each other, causing
irreparable damage to the team's future.

It still might happen.
But at least last night, they put the bad vibes on hold for one game,
and reminded us that Philadelphia professional basketball isn't totally
beyond redemption, Funny-Looking Kid or no. Thanks for that, dudes.

Instant Replay: Nationals 5, Phillies 1

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Instant Replay: Nationals 5, Phillies 1

BOX SCORE

The Phillies' late-May slide continued in a 5-1 loss to the Washington Nationals at Citizens Bank Park on Tuesday night.
 
Aaron Nola delivered a solid start, but got poor run support. The Phillies entered the game averaging 3.2 runs per game, lowest in the majors.
 
The Nationals scored all their runs on home runs.
 
The Phillies have lost nine of their last 11 games. They are 1-7 in their last eight and have gone from 25-19 and two games back in the NL East to 26-26 and 5½ games back.
  
Starting pitching report
Nola went six innings and allowed two runs, both on solo homers. He walked one and struck out six. He is 4-4 with a 2.88 ERA.
 
Washington right-hander Joe Ross (5-4) pitched a strong game. He gave up just three hits and a run over seven innings. He walked two and struck out five. Ross has given up just two runs over 14 innings in his last two starts.
 
Bullpen report
Jonathan Papelbon closed it out for the Nats in a non-save situation.
 
At the plate
The Phillies had just four hits. They have been held to two or fewer runs 20 times in their 52 games.

Cesar Hernandez tripled home the Phillies' only run.

Jayson Werth and Daniel Murphy accounted for the Nationals’ first two runs pair of solo homers against Nola. Danny Espinosa smacked a two-run homer off Colton Murray in the ninth and Stephen Drew followed with an inside-the-park homer.
 
Murphy also singled in the game. He had 47 hits in the month of May, tying a Washington/Montreal franchise record that had previously been shared by Al Oliver and Marquis Grissom.

Lineup stuff
Mackanin was trying to send Hernandez a message by batting him eighth (see story).
 
Bryce Harper did not play for Washington. He was hit on the right leg by a pitch in Monday night’s game.
 
Slumping Ryan Howard started at first base and went hitless in three at-bats to fall to .154. He hit .101 (7 for 69) in the month of May.
 
Howard will not start Wednesday night against Max Scherzer. He is 1 for 18 with 11 strikeouts against Scherzer. Tommy Joseph will start that game.
 
Minor matters
Cody Asche’s minor-league rehab stint expires Wednesday. He could rejoin the team at any time.
 
Up next
 The series concludes on Wednesday night. Lefty Adam Morgan (1-3, 6.67) pitches against Washington right-hander Scherzer (5-4, 4.05).

Drexel alum Ken Tribbett enjoys 'special' week for Union

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Drexel alum Ken Tribbett enjoys 'special' week for Union

CHESTER, Pa. — For more than a month, Union center back Ken Tribbett waited patiently on the sidelines, hoping to get the starting spot back that he had and then lost.

Last week, he indeed got back on the field … and then some.

After Joshua Yaro separated his shoulder in Orlando on Wednesday, Tribbett proceeded to notch his first MLS goal and assist, before playing the full 90 minutes in front of 30 family members in his home state of Colorado on Saturday.

It was quite the eventful week for someone who wasn’t expected to play at all during the road trip, let alone accomplish a couple of emotional milestones.

“It’s an unbelievable feeling,” Tribbett told reporters from Tuesday’s training session after the Union returned home following hard-fought road draws vs. Orlando City SC and the Colorado Rapids. “For me, being out a month, mentally I had to make sure I stayed tuned in. And when I got my chance, I stepped in and was ready to go.”

Even if you are mentally prepared, it’s still not an easy thing to step in at center back in the middle of a game, considering that’s a position that rarely gets changed. Making things even more difficult was the fact that Yaro, who took over starting duties after Tribbett rolled his ankle in April, had been looking every bit like the No. 2 pick in this year’s draft.

“Josh was playing a great game in Orlando,” Union head coach Jim Curtin said. “If you go back and watch the tape, he was one of our top performers. Ken stepped in at the end of the first half, which is challenging at center back — not a position you like to sub at all. But Ken came in pretty seamlessly and got the goal, which is a bonus, obviously.”

You can call it a really big bonus.

Tribbett was never expected to even be in MLS this year after failing to get much notice following a standout career at Drexel.

And he certainly wasn’t expected to log much playing time this season with the Union, who added Yaro and Anderson, a Brazilian, to a position that already featured a rising star in Richie Marquez.

So surprises are nothing new for Tribbett, who started the first five games of the year after soaring up the depth chart in the preseason and now has a goal to add to his unlikely MLS resume.

But it’s no surprise to him.

“I don’t think shock is the right word because I expect a lot of myself and I expect to score a couple of goals this year,” Tribbett said. “So it was just more relief to get the first one out of the way. Any time you score, it’s jubilation, so that was awesome. And to tie the game in Orlando after going down 2-1 was really good for the team, so everything about it was just a special moment.”

Tribbett, who also had a secondary assist in Orlando, enjoyed another “special moment” just three days later when he got to play in the Denver area where he grew up. That was not something he could have imagined after his circuitous journey took him from Colorado to Drexel to the USL’s Harrisburg City Islanders and now to the Union.

“That was probably a moment I won’t ever forget,” Tribbett said. “I had about 20 or 30 family members there, and for a lot of them it was the first time they’ve seen me play professionally. So being back home in Colorado was a special feeling.”

Although the Union backline stayed organized and surrendered only a couple of shots on target in Colorado, Curtin did say it wasn’t the best performance from Tribbett. But the Union coach is ready to lean on him again for Wednesday’s game vs. the Columbus Crew at Talen Energy Stadium (7 p.m./TCN) while Yaro gets an MRI on his shoulder.

“He did fatigue at the end and I talked to him about it,” Curtin said of Tribbett. “He had a couple of little mistakes toward the end of the game. Part of that is your legs starting to fade. But it’s good for him that’s under his belt. He’ll be ready to go now [Wednesday] for the full 90 minutes.”

With the Union idle for two weeks following Wednesday’s game because of a Copa America layoff — and Tribbett’s place in the lineup uncertain from there — the Drexel alum is certainly excited to get back on the field for his first home game since April 8.

“It’s a very important game,” Tribbett said. “We want to go into the break with certain goals for ourselves. We want to be at the top of the conference, and if we win, we’ll achieve that goal. We want to keep one goal per game [allowed]. Right now, we’re one off that, so if we get a shutout tomorrow, we’ll be right back on track.”

Pete Mackanin sends Cesar Hernandez a message

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Pete Mackanin sends Cesar Hernandez a message

Pete Mackanin dropped second baseman Cesar Hernandez to eighth in the batting order for Tuesday night’s game against the Washington Nationals.

“If you want to call it a message you can call it a message,” Mackanin said.

Hernandez entered the game hitting .255 with a .616 OPS. Last year, he hit .272 with and .687 OPS.

“I expect more out of him,” Mackanin said. “I think he's a better hitter than he's shown. I think he's a .280 hitter and I think he's at .250. I want to see improvement. We need him to get back up to .280, where I think he belongs. He’s got to make adjustments. We need offense.”

Mackanin pointed to Hernandez’s double-play partner, shortstop Freddy Galvis, as an example of a player who has made improvements.

Galvis entered Tuesday night hitting .257 with a .696 OPS. But in the month of May, he was hitting .277 with a .708 OPS.

“Freddy is starting to come on,” Mackanin said. “He’s starting to make adjustments.”

Galvis has also played excellent defense.

The Phillies are a rebuilding club with a number of potential big-league contributors rounding out their development in the minors. The team’s top prospect is a shortstop – J.P. Crawford – and he’s in Triple A now. It’s not out of the question that he will be the team’s opening day shortstop next season.

Crawford’s eventual ascension impacts both Galvis and Hernandez. Galvis can also play second base. Whether Hernandez or Galvis becomes the second baseman when Crawford arrives could be determined by who hits. This is the time to make impressions.

“That's basically what it boils down to,” Mackanin said. “I've even talked to them about that — 'It's an important year for both of you because there are people who want to be in the big leagues that are in the minor leagues and want to take your job.' You have to approach it that way. You can't let down. You have to stay focused and work hard.”

While all signs point to Crawford taking over at shortstop in the future, Mackanin said Galvis’ defense should not be taken for granted.

“As well as Freddy is playing shortstop, you'd hate to move a guy like that out of that position,” Mackanin said. “It's a defensive position and he's been so good at it.”

Galvis entered Tuesday night with just two errors in 50 games. His .990 fielding percentage trailed only San Francisco’s Brandon Crawford and Detroit’s Jose Iglesias, both .995.