This Grantland profile on Andre Iguodala is probably the best thing you'll read today

This Grantland profile on Andre Iguodala is probably the best thing you'll read today

Well, the best thing not on this website, anyway. Master profiler Jonathan Abrams has taken on longtime NBA enigma (and Philadelphia 76er of nearly a decade) Andre Iguodala with his latest opus, and the article paints a typically complete, compelling and complex portrait of the oft-misunderstood baller.

You should really go to Grantland and read the whole thing yourself, but in case you're on a schedule at the moment, here's some highlights before you can get a full lunch break's worth of reading in:

  • 'Dre always wanted to be Pippen. "Llike every basketball-dribbling Illinois kid growing up in the 1990s, he practiced his fadeaway like MJ. But Iguodala really wanted to be like Scottie. And the more he watched, the more he realized that Jordan's teammate Scottie Pippen influenced the game in profound ways, often without scoring...Iguodala studied how Pippen defended Indiana's point guard, Mark Jackson, in the 1998 conference finals. Guarding the shorter Jackson, Pippen almost single-handedly denied ball movement on his side of the court."
  • Even in high school, he was a second banana. "[Richard] McBride leapfrogged Iguodala and everyone else, starting on the team's varsity squad from the moment he arrived on campus. 'We've had a lot of great players, but Rich McBride coming out his eighth-grade year was the best player I've ever seen in Springfield, by far,' said Pat McGuire, a former Lanphier assistant. 'Talentwise, he was ahead of the game. Andre was in his shadow.'"
  • He never considered the NBA until the year before he was drafted. "One day, [teammate Hassan] Adams presented Iguodala with a printout of an online mock draft. An analyst had projected Iguodala as a first-round selection. Iguodala said he hadn't considered himself an NBA prospect before reading the mock draft. It changed him. 'I wasn't a college student [anymore],' Iguodala said. 'Everything was basketball. It was all about 'How do I get to a place I hadn't even dreamed about?' I didn't have fun in college because I was so focused on basketball.'"
  • He might not have had fun in college, but at least he had a potentially Three's Company-esque living situation. "Iguodala moved in with two female soccer players, and their crisscrossed schedules worked to perfection. They were hardly home when Iguodala was. He was hardly home when they were. His solitary life paid off."
  • Elton Brand and company used to call him "Malcolm X". "'He loves his friends,' Brand continued. 'But if you're not — we used to call him Malcolm X. He'd just give you his attitude if you were against him. It's a positive thing — if you're his friend or you're on his team, he'll do anything for you.'"
  • He still smarts over the timing of his trade from Philly. "'I spoke to Doug damn near every day throughout the Olympics. The day before the trade, he was like, 'Great job with the game last night.' I think we beat Nigeria by 80 or something crazy like that. He was like, 'Can't wait to take the energy from the Olympics and take it to the season'....I wasn't upset about the trade, it was the timing. It was like, 'I'm in the Olympics, I'm playing some meaningful minutes, and you're trading me in the medal round.''"
  • He still doesn't get why Philadelphia didn't appreciate his Sixers teams. "'They're saying the team hasn't had much success since Iverson's team went to the Finals,' Iguodala said. 'We only missed the playoffs twice. They were talking like we were just this bum squad the whole time I was there.'"
  • He gets Jerry West's seal of approval. "[West] then told Iguodala, 'You would have loved playing with me. And I would have loved playing with you. 'Compliments like that from the Logo don't come often. 'Don't let it go to your head,' he said before departing."

Penn falls to hot-shooting George Mason

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Penn Athletics

Penn falls to hot-shooting George Mason

PHILADELPHIA -- Jalen Jenkins scored 22 points and grabbed six rebounds to help lead George Mason over Penn 79-60 on Saturday.

Jenkins was 9 of 11 from the field and hit all four of his free throws for the Patriots (8-3), who have won seven straight. Marquise Moore added 17 points and led the team with 16 rebounds -- his eighth double-double this season -- along with 10 assists. Otis Livingston II had 13 points.

Jenkins sank two jumpers and a layup and Jaire Grayer hit a 3-pointer as part of a 13-0 run late in the second period that gave the Patriots a 70-55 lead with 3:18 remaining.

George Mason trailed 44-40 early in the second. Livingston and Karmari Newman sank 3-pointers and Moore drained a layup midway that put the Patriots back on top, 55-48, with 10:39 to play.

Matt Howard scored 15 points with seven rebounds for the Quakers (3-5).

La Salle keeps things close, ultimately falls to Georgetown

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USA Today Images

La Salle keeps things close, ultimately falls to Georgetown

MIAMI -- L.J. Peak scored 24 points, Rodney Pryor added 19 and Georgetown closed with a flourish to beat La Salle 93-78 on Saturday in the Hoophall Miami Invitational.

It was tied at 67 with 8:44 left, before the Hoyas finished on a 26-11 run.

Jessie Govan scored 19 points and Jagan Mosely had 14 for the Hoyas (6-4), who won their fourth straight. Georgetown shot 53 percent for the game and 58 percent from 3-point range.

Jordan Price scored 23 points for La Salle (4-4), which got 19 more from B.J. Johnson and 10 from Pookie Powell. The Explorers were outscored 36-22 from the line, getting there 10 fewer times than Georgetown.

It was a homecoming for Hoyas reserve center Trey Mourning, whose father Alonzo Mourning is one of two players -- soon to be three, when Shaquille O'Neal gets added to the list this month -- to have his number retired by the Miami Heat.

The younger Mourning wears No. 33, just like his dad did at Georgetown and for the Heat, and used to work at the arena as a Heat ballboy. He got into the game for the final 23.2 seconds, as the Hoyas ran out the clock.