We Thumped 'Em: Sixers Get Easiest of Wins Against Detroit

We Thumped 'Em: Sixers Get Easiest of Wins Against Detroit

Pity poor Greg Monroe. The Pistons' big man was dominant against the Sixers tonight, as he has been for much of the season, going for 20, 8 and 3 in just 31 minutes against Lavoy Allen, Nik Vucevic and Elton Brand. But as it turned out, it couldn't have made less of a difference. The Pistons shot just 32% from the field for the game and turned the ball over 22 times, as the Sixers pulled out to a 16 point lead at half-time and never looked back. The entire fourth quarter was garbage time as the Sixers cruised to the 97-68 victory.

Not too much to talk about on the Sixers' end—they won the way they were winning earlier in the season, including in the two times they already steamrolled Detroit—by playing stifling perimeter defense (Rodney Stuckey, Brandon Knight and Ben Gordon shot a combined 8-30 for the Pistons' backcourt), by sharing the ball (Andre Iguodala, Jrue Holiday and Lou Williams all had at least five assists) and by making sure that Andres Nocioni and Francisco Elson get as little court time as possible. (They only played a combined six minutes, but still managed a hilarious sequence where Nocioni shot a three in transition that got blocked, then Elson turned the ball over trying to make a feed from the post to a cutting Noc.)

Even though the Sixers' MVP tonight might have been Thaddeus Young—20 points and eight rebounds to match Monroe, and continuing his ridiculous season-long trend of stealing the ball more frequently than he turns it over with two swipes and one giveaway—Thad's night might end up being best remembered for the one play he didn't make. Streaking down the court on a fast break, one step behind the ball-handler Iguodala, Thad ended up taking a beautiful between-the-legs feed from 'Dre and soared towards the basket for the easy dunk. Then this happened.

If 'Dre looked a little pissed in the replay, it's hard to blame him—this should have been a season-highlight dish for 'Dre, one that would've dropped jaws even at the dunk-happy exhibition he just played in on Sunday. And young Thaddeus knew he really blew it, too, hanging his head in disbelief and grinning sheepishly for lack of a better response. It's easily the worst blown dunk the Sixers have had since 'Dre himself clanged an uncontested windmill dunk in Atlanta—though as with tonight, that game was a blowout, so it was easy to laugh about it afterwards.

Now, back to Philly for a meeting with the West-best Oklahoma City Thunder. Pretty safe bet that that one won't be as easy a W, but we'll all probably feel a lot more confident facing OKC off an authoritative one-game winning streak then an increasingly discouraging six-game slide. In any event, after the roughest couple weeks of the season, it appears it's time to enjoy Philly basketball again. WOOOOOO ELSON AND NOCIONI.

Sans Spellman, challenges face Villanova in run to repeat

Sans Spellman, challenges face Villanova in run to repeat

VILLANOVA, Pa. — Darryl Reynolds said it hurt. And he wasn’t alone. 

A month ago, Reynolds and the rest of the Villanova Wildcats found out five-star freshman big man Omari Spellman would not be eligible to play in 2016-17.

And despite Spellman — at 6-foot-9 and 260 pounds — being the biggest competition cutting into Reynolds’ playing time for his senior year, Reynolds understood the ramifications from losing what was expected to be a key cog in Villanova’s next run for glory.

“We lost a — no pun intended — big piece to the puzzle,” Reynolds said Tuesday at Villanova’s media day. “He went down, but everybody else has realized that we need that much more from everybody else.

“Me and Omari are close, in more ways than on the court. It would’ve been exciting to play with him. But it also provided that much more motivation.”

Motivation because Reynolds, a Lower Merion grad, also understands what the ramifications mean for him, too. The 6-foot-9, 240-pound senior may arguably be the most important player on the 2016-17 Wildcats. 

For three years, Reynolds has largely taken a backseat, hidden by the shadow of Daniel Ochefu. Now he’s front and center.

“He battled through that,” fellow senior Josh Hart said. “Never complained. Never had any down moments. Brought it every single day. We know he can play at this level.”

Reynolds heads a position in which Villanova was supposed to have depth. Now it has question marks. Reynolds and Spellman were going to be a 1-2 punch inside and a perfect supplement to a bevy of offensive talent around them. The question marks up front include sophomore Tim Delaney and freshman Dylan Painter. How quickly the two of them get going will be big. And so, too, will be figuring out where Fordham transfer forward Eric Paschall fits in the rotation.

Coach Jay Wright, who said Reynolds would be a starter, talked more about the other pieces behind Reynolds when asked what he’d be expecting from the senior big man.

“I think part of our challenge is Tim Delaney and Dylan Painter,” Wright said. “Which one of them, if not both of them, can step up and give us the depth that Darryl gave us last year up front when we needed size? Down the stretch in big games against big-time teams, you need that size. We’ve got to develop Tim and Dylan and see how they do with that, see how Eric Paschall can do. Can he play bigger? We definitely have our challenges.”

Those challenges also include replacing leadership roles vacated by Ryan Arcidiacono, Ochefu and a trio of walk-ons.

Insert Reynolds there, too. The Wildcats will start three seniors this year. Hart and Kris Jenkins may do most of the scoring, but they’re pretty reserved off the court and when talking to the media.

“Obviously Ryan (Arcidiacono) was a great leader for us. He was our rock,” Hart said. “When you look at this team, a lot of times we look at [Reynolds]. He calms everybody down. He vocally tries to make sure everybody’s on one accord. Basketball-wise, he’s always been good. You saw the Providence game last year when we needed him to step up and he had, what, like 19 and 11?”

Hart remembers the numbers well, even if he added an extra rebound to the ledger. Reynolds was 9 for 10 from the floor and had two blocks in 36 minutes of action to help the Wildcats earn revenge with a road win after the Friars beat them in Philadelphia two weeks prior.

That game was the last of a three-game stretch in late January into early February when Ochefu was sidelined with a concussion. Reynolds’ minutes over that stretch: 29, 31 and 36, respectively.

That experience, Reynolds says, coupled with the rest of 2015-16 — when he saw an uptick in minutes from his sophomore season’s 5.4 per game to 17.1 per game — will be easy to draw from in 2016-17.

“There’s nothing like getting out there and actually playing,” Reynolds said. “You see a lot from the sidelines. You learn a lot playing spot minutes. You get different things. But just being out there throughout entire games, playing 20-plus minutes, it teaches you things that you could never have learned from another perspective. I learned a lot from those experiences and I think it made me the player that I am in many ways. It’s the same thing with this year. I’m still going to learn a ton in a sense of being out there that much more and not having Daniel. 

“In many ways he taught me a lot. So not having him, not having that voice in my ear, not having that guy to go against in practice, it will make me grow up. 

“Nothing wrong with that,” he said with a smile.