Battling ALS, Kevin Turner Stays Positive, Agrees With Rule Changes

Battling ALS, Kevin Turner Stays Positive, Agrees With Rule Changes

Back in 2010, we learned former Eagles fullback Kevin Turner had been diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. FoxSports.com's Lisa Horne caught up with Turner at his home in Alabama, where he admits his body's deterioration has been frustrating, though he remains surprisingly upbeat.

The story paints a uneasy portrait of a 42-year-old man who was once a world-class athlete, but now needs help with some everyday tasks. However, it's not without its revelations. Turner discusses the possibility he has CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease that is caused by repeated trauma to the brain over a long period of time -- and that it could even be the root cause of his ALS symptoms.

Turner was a punishing blocker and ball carrier for eight seasons in the NFL, five of those with Philadelphia, but he defends the league's recent rule changes aimed at protecting players from serious, long-term injuries. The new kickoff and defenseless receiver rules may irritate some fans, and coaches may not appreciate new rules limiting contact during practice, but Turner insists these changes are for the best.

"There's no way to go through practice and halfway do it playing fullback when you're blocking at full speed," Turner sayd.

Turner realizes a lot of football fans aren't happy with some rules designed to safeguard the players.

"It's nothing like flag football," Turner said. "They don't get it. I would think they would want to watch their favorite players or teams for years to come. You can hit someone who isn't looking and practically decapitate them. It's entertainment to them.

"There are big-time collisions. Let's not take a step back to the Roman era where we're putting football players up there with gladiators. It's a game. It's entertainment. It's a dream of theirs, like it was of mine, but it's not worth their living that last 20 years of their lives with dementia, Alzheimer's or ALS."

It's hard to argue with his stance. As awareness of the lasting impacts of these collisions increases, we've seen far too many examples of athletes whose quality of life became sub-standard much sooner than it has any right to be. The preeminent example in Philadelphia is former Eagles safety Andre Waters, who killed himself in 2006 -- apparently while suffering from CTE.

Thankfully, Turner doesn't sound like a man who will be taking his own life. The silver lining is he manages to remain positive.

"(I'm) grateful for the Alabama fans that have supported me throughout this ordeal — they've just been incredible to me," Turner says. "I feel blessed. I'm able to walk, talk and breathe."

Go read the story and catch up with a classic Eagles fullback.

>> ALS or victim of violent sport? [FOX Sports]
>> Did Andre Waters Die for Our Entertainment? [T7L]

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.