Bernard Pierce's Temple Career in Numbers

Bernard Pierce's Temple Career in Numbers

Running back Bernard Pierce's decision late last evening to leave Temple University for the NFL Draft after his junior season came as virtually no surprise. In fact, it would have been a surprise had he chosen to stay. 
Temple fans, Owls beat writers and university officials themselves knew there was a substantial chance that the New Mexico Bowl would be Bernard's last game in a Temple uniform. As we wrote over a month ago, the next time you see Pierce at Lincoln Financial Field, it'll be on a Sunday (unless, of course, he's a part of future Saturday Wild Card Weekend games...or Monday Night games...or, as commenter "TU11" reminded just reminded us, Thursday Night games — just covering our bases here).
Anyway, with Bernard's career at Temple now behind him, we thought, better than writing some long-winded retrospective about existence and meaning and whatever else I usually do when I feel the urge to wax philosophic about Temple football, to provide you with the full slate of Pierce's record-breaking accomplishments, and to weigh those against the feats of some of the best runners in the nation.
Bernard Pierce in numerals and an analysis of his draft stock after the jump...
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Temple University Single Season Records Set by Pierce:

— Most rushing touchdowns (27)
— Most total touchdowns (27)
— Most points scored (162)
— Most 100-yard games (9)

Temple Owl Single Game Records Set by Pierce:

— Most rushing touchdowns (5)
— Most points scored (30)

Temple University Career Records Set by Pierce:

— Most rushing touchdowns (53)
— Most total touchdowns (54)
— Most points scored (324)
— Second-most rushing yards (3,470 — Trails only Paul Palmer's 4,895)
— Second-most 100-yard games (18 — Trails only Paul Palmer's 21)

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For much of the early season, especially after his five touchdown outburst in the Maryland game, Pierce was leading the nation in rushing touchdowns, ahead of even Wisconsin's Montee Ball who would ultimately challenge Barry Sander's all-time record for rushing scores in a season. By season's end, Pierce's 27 running touchdowns would trail only Ball's 33, putting the Temple back second in the nation in that category. He would fall just out of the top 10—12th and 13th—in yards per attempt and attempts per game.
Critics will argue that Pierce's success was inflated thanks the lesser status of the MAC conference and that his numbers, both nationally and in the school's all-time record books, are consequently misleading. Such an argument is really quite amusing to anyone who has actually seen him play football. As Temple head coach Steve Addazio puts it, "He's got speed. He's got size. He's got make you miss." Really, Bernard has absolutely every tool to succeed in the NFL, except for maybe just one: durability.
If there's a knock against Pierce, its been his troubles staying healthy. Not once in his three-year college career did he manage to play in every game in a season. His sophomore campaign was so riddled with injury issues that one wondered whether Bernard could ever reach his true potential. Thankfully for him, his junior season was a welcome return to form. Staying mostly healthy in 2011 allowed him to break some of the school records he had already set when he was also mostly healthy as a freshman in 2009.
For the most part, Bernard's astonishing success when on the field and his increased time actually on that field over this past season has worked to quell some of those durability concerns. Nonetheless, there is no way Pierce's prior injury issues did not play a substantial part in his decision to leave school. Projected in private by a coach as a third-round pick, the same as Ball before he ultimately decided to return to school, Bernard obviously had that same option to come back to school, set some more records, and further improve his draft stock. That said, yet another injury, especially a serious one, would only have decreased, rather than increased, his draft value. 
In the meantime, he will obviously have the opportunity to move himself up the board with strong performances at the combine and in pre-draft workouts. Should ultimately wind up a third-rounder as projected, he will be of a high value for the team who ultimately takes him.
As for the school he's leaving, replacing one of the program's all-time greats will be added to the list of issues facing the Temple program in the coming years. Without Pierce, it will be up to Steve Addazio and the Temple staff to build on this program's momentum, momentum generated with great help from Bernard himself. 

Flyers skate update: Matt Read's 400th game; Andrew MacDonald scratched

Flyers skate update: Matt Read's 400th game; Andrew MacDonald scratched

VANCOUVER, British Columbia – Matt Read did not have to worry about being an NHL draft bust.

He did not impress scouts enough to be drafted at all while playing collegiate hockey at Bemidji State in Minnesota. Instead, the Flyers' winger had to make the NHL the hard way — as a free agent.

“Out of college, I signed with the Flyers and was just doing everything I could to get an opportunity to make the team,” Read, 30, recalled after the team’s morning skate before the Flyers take on the Vancouver Canucks.

His hard work and determination were rewarded here as he drew into the Flyers lineup for his 400th NHL career game.

“If you told me as a 12-year-old self I was playing 400 games in the NHL, I’d be pretty happy, obviously,” Read said. “I don’t have enough words to describe (what the accomplishment means.) Every day in the NHL is a blessing, I guess. You show up every day, work hard and have fun. As a kid, I wanted to be a professional hockey player, and I get to live it out everyday, which is amazing.”

Read originally signed as a free agent with the Flyers in 2011. Unlike many other NHLers, he has played his entire career with the same organization.

“The opportunity to play for the same team for six years is almost unheard of in the National Hockey League these days, so (I) take advantage of it and enjoy it,” Read said.

What has enabled him to stick?

“I don’t know,” he said. “I’m just showing up at the rink every day to work hard, have fun, be a team guy and do as much as I can to make this team better.”

Flyers coach Dave Hakstol said he has a “solid level of trust” in Read.

“There’s a lot of different pathways towards the NHL,” Hakstol said. “I think what you see in that guys that are able to hit a milestone like 400 is, there’s a level of dedication and consistency in terms of work habits to get there. Obviously, Matt has demonstrated those. It’s a hell of a milestone. (But) probably first and foremost on his mind, I would think, tonight is playing a good hockey game and helping our team.”

MacDonald gets night off
Flyers defenseman Andrew MacDonald received the night off as Hakstol made him a healthy scratch. The move was somewhat surprising, because MacDonald has played every game since he was scratched Nov. 19 against Tampa Bay.

Hakstol said MacDonald needed a rest. As a result, Brandon Manning was shifted to the right side from the left and paired with Ivan Provorov.

According to the coach, Manning has not had trouble switching sides this season.

“He’s done a pretty good job,” Hakstol said. “If you look at it, particularly this year, he’s been pretty efficient in making that transition. Is it easy? No.”

Neuvy gets the nod again
Hakstol did not think goaltender Michal Neuvirth needed a rest. He got the nod for his fourth straight start and sixth in the last seven games overall.

“He’s been the guy that’s been in a rhythm for us and he’s done a pretty good job and he’ll go back tonight,” Hakstol said.

Neuvirth was not complaining about the heavy workload.

“It’s good to be playing,” Neuvirth said. “The more I play, the more comfortable I feel. It’s been good.”

He also prepared to be comfortable with the risk of added fatigue.

“It is what it is — you’ve gotta be ready anytime, any day,” Neuvirth said. “It’s a good opportunity for me and it’s gonna be a good challenge.”

Former Flyers coach enshrined
Late former Flyers coach Pat Quinn has been honored with a life-sized statue outside the home of the Canucks. The monument, funded by a group of Quinn’s friends and business partners, was unveiled over the weekend.

Quinn began his coaching career with the Flyers in 1977-78 before holding coaching and managing positions with the AHL Phantoms and four other NHL clubs, including the Canucks. He guided the Flyers to a 35-game unbeaten streak — a record for North American sports — in 1979-80, when they reached the Stanley Cup finals.

Loose pucks
• The Flyers’ .667 winning percentage in Vancouver ranks as their best in any current NHL city. 

• Despite outshooting their opponents in 15 of 20 games dating to Jan. 1, the Flyers are 5-8-2 in the 15 contests.

Scratches: Defensemen Andrew MacDonald and Nick Schultz

Lineup
F: Schenn-Giroux-Simmonds

Weise-Couturier-Voracek

Raffl-Cousins-Read

VandeVelde-Bellemare-Lyubimov

D: Provorov-Manning

Gostisbehere-Streit

Del  Zotto-Gudas

G: Neuvirth

Phillies prospect Andrew Knapp is determined to win a job in the majors

Phillies prospect Andrew Knapp is determined to win a job in the majors

CLEARWATER, Fla. — The dew on the infield grass had barely dried when Andrew Knapp was marched out to the firing squad at Phillies camp early Sunday morning.
 
He took his position at first base and looked across the diamond where Phillies instructors Doug Mansolino, Chris Truby and Larry Bowa were lined up at third base, shortstop and second base, respectively. Armed with fungo bats and a dozens baseballs each, the trio of sharpshooters proceeded to smash bullet one- and two-hoppers at Knapp, who was tasked with pulling them out of the dirt to complete the putout.
 
“Good job,” shouted Bowa, a tough grader when it comes to infield work, as Knapp finished up the hellacious early-morning drill.
 
Knapp is a catcher by trade, but he will continue these intense individual sessions at first base throughout the spring — in addition to his regular defensive work behind the plate.
 
A 25-year-old switch-hitter, Knapp was the Phillies’ second-round selection in the 2013 draft. He’s getting a lot attention in this camp because he has a shot to make the club as a reserve player. The Phils are in need of a backup catcher and a backup first baseman and Knapp, in big-league camp for the second time, is trying to show he can handle both assignments in one package.
 
“Last year it was more of a happy-to-be-here thing,” he said. “I was just trying to pick as many brains as I could and take in as much knowledge as I could.
 
“But this year it’s more of a let’s-go-win-a-job kind of deal.”
 
General manager Matt Klentak and manager Pete Mackanin first floated the idea of carrying Knapp as a two-position reserve at the winter meetings.
 
Of course, it came with a lot of qualifiers. Knapp is still considered a developing player and team decision-makers would have to consider what impact a reserve role would have on his development. Also, the prototypical backup catcher in the majors is a plus defender who has experience handling a big-league pitching staff. Knapp has never played in the majors and his defense is considered a work in progress. Later in the winter, the Phillies signed two big-league veteran catchers (Bryan Holaday and Ryan Hanigan) to minor-league deals and they are very much in the mix for the job.
 
“I kind of understand there’s a definite value in having a veteran guy as a backup, but I think I can do the job on the field,” Knapp said.
 
A potential separator for Knapp could be his bat and his versatility if he can continue to develop it. He is not a novice at first base. He played there as a sophomore at the University of California. Knapp also has this going for him: He’s on the 40-man roster and with so many young prospects on it and the probable need to add an outfielder like Chris Coughlan later in camp, that could work in Knapp’s favor.
 
Another factor that could held Knapp’s chances: The Phillies’ development blueprint calls for Rhys Hoskins and Jorge Alfaro to get the bulk of the playing time at first base and catcher, respectively, at Triple A.
 
“You’d like to see him get 500 at-bats, but it’s not a perfect world,” Bowa said. “Our Triple A team is loaded. He might find himself in the same role at Triple A. if that’s the case, it might be best if he came here if he swings the bat like he can and he can provide versatility.
 
“A guy like him can give you some options and flexibility. When you face the Mets and they have three stud right-handers throwing 95, it might be nice to have a guy like that to give (first baseman) Tommy Joseph a blow.”
 
Knapp had a brilliant season with the bat at Double A in 2015. He hit .360 with 11 homers, 56 RBIs and a 1.050 OPS in 55 games, earning him the franchise’s Paul Owens Award as minor-league player of the year.
 
Knapp tapered off at Triple A last season. He hit .266 with eight homers, 46 RBIs and a .719 OPS over a full season. Knapp’s day last summer typically started with defensive work at 1:30 in the afternoon.
 
“I would get my hitting in, but I don’t think there was as much of a focus on it as there was the year before,” he said. “I do think last year I took a real step forward defensively, especially in the second half of the year. I kind of had a tough first half, but the second half I really honed in on the defensive part, blocking and throwing mostly, just kind of keeping everything in front and shutting down the running game.”

A lot of eyes will be on Knapp when the exhibition games start next week.
 
“We need to find out if he’s capable of doing it,” Mackanin said. “Catching is a defensive-oriented position. We need good defense. We need good game calling, a catcher who can handle pitchers, and that’s what we’re going to be looking at from a guy like Knapp as well as the other guys. We’re going to take a good long look at that.
 
“He’s definitely in the mix. I want to play him a lot to see him. We all want to see what he can do offensively and defensively. From what I’ve been told he’s shown a lot of improvement and we’re going to look for that. We’re looking for the 25 best men. There’s a good chance he might be one of them.”
 
Knapp is determined to show that he is.
 
“It’s open for someone to go take it and I want to be that guy,” he said.