A Breakdown Of The Sixers Game One Win

A Breakdown Of The Sixers Game One Win


As you know by now, the Sixers stole one from the Pistons in game one of the seven game series. Haven't caught Sixers fever just yet? No worries, our buddy Goot wrote up a nice quarter-by-quarter breakdown of the game.

1st Quarter
Thaddeus Young got the start and made Mo look good, with an early steal, dunk, and a couple of nice put backs.  Rasheed Wallace heated up and scored 8 of the Piston's first 12 points.  The Sixers shooting went cold and they didn't hit a shot in the last 4:28 of the quarter allowing the Pistons to take a 27-22 lead after 1.

2nd Quarter
The Sixers playoff inexperience showed in the 2nd quarter, they had too many turnovers, poor shot selection, and the Pistons owned the glass.  After a 'Sheed 3 to put the Pistons up 11, Mo realized he need Reggie Evans and Dalembert in to defend against 'Sheed and bench player Jason Maxiell(who ended with 10pts and 9reb. at the half).  The refs wanted to make sure 'Sheeds stat line was full and T'ed him up for arguing a foul called against Prince.  The Sixers entered the locker room down 13, 31-58.

3rd Quarter
The Sixers were determined to make this a game and came out hot, going
on an 8-0 run to start the half.  After a Pistons' timeout, they
answered with a 9-0 run of their own.  After trading a few shots, the
Sixers went on another 10-0 run and eventually ended the quarter down
70-63.

4th Quarter
Andre Miller came out like a man possessed and stole the ball from
Hamilton and hit a layup to set the tone.  Miller went on to score 12
of his 20 points in the first 6 minutes of the quarter and the Sixers
took their first lead since the 1st, 78-77.  Reggie Evans hit a
turnaround at the top of circle as the shot clock expired to keep the
Sixers ahead.  92% free throw shooter Chancey Billups missed 3 of 4
foul shots and Lou Williams hit a 19-footer, and the Sixers held a
84-80 lead with 2 minutes to play. The Sixers came out of a timeout and
Iguodala booted the ball driving to the net, the Pistons scored on
their next possession down the floor to pull within 2.  Andre Miller
missed a running jumper and Reggie Evans was there to tip in to put the
Sixers up 86-82.  'Sheed takes off his headband to show he means
business and draws a foul at the other end and knocks down his foul
shots.  Iguodala got fouled, made his first, missed his second, and
Maxiell got called for a lane violation, but Iguodala missed again.
Billups regained his form and sunk 2 foul shots to pull within 1.  The
Sixers got the ball out of a timeout and Iguodala made a pass to Sammy,
who then got called for an offensive foul (personally, I think it was a
bad call;  Maxiell got to the spot after Sammy was already in the
air).  With 26 seconds left on the clock, the Sixers were up 1 and the
Pistons had the ball.  The Sixers defense clamped down, Tayshaun Prince
missed a 19 footer, and Iguodala collected the rebound and got fouled
at 11 seconds.  With Iguodala at the line, he missed his first...
NOOoooo.. but hit his second to put the Sixers up 2.  Pistons took
their last timeout.  Right before play was about to start, 'Sheed leans
in on the Sixers huddle. He had a smile on his face, but that's messed
up... you don't pull that crap in the playoffs.  The Pistons run their
play and it's to 'Sheed, Karma pays him back and he misses it .
Iguodala secures the rebound, gets fouled, and thankfully makes both
shots to end the game.

Notes
If the Sixers are going to stay in this series, Reggie Evans (11-14)
needs remain a factor down low, Rasheed Wallace (24-9, 7 blocks) and
Maxiell (11-12, 6 off) were eating them up in the second quarter.  The
Sixers really stepped up the defense in the second half, when they held
to Pistons to 35 points on top of 39% shooting for the game.  Andre
Miller took the game over to begin the 4th and was the primary reason
the Sixers pulled out a win.  The Sixers need to make their free
throws, and they were lucky to win after shooting 19 of 27 at the line.
It's not often Chauncey Billups is going to miss 3 free throws in the
4th quarter.  Game 2 is set Wednesday night 7:30pm.

-Goot

(Inquirer Image)

Now on Phillies' bench, Ty Kelly looks back fondly on Team Israel experience

Now on Phillies' bench, Ty Kelly looks back fondly on Team Israel experience

Ty Kelly is currently the 25th man on the Phillies' roster, a utliity man who has all of two starts with the club this year.

But two and a half months ago, he was one of the headlining players on the Cinderella squad of the 2017 World Baseball Classic.

Kelly was the starting third baseman for Team Israel, which made a surprising run to the second round with a perfect run through Pool A. The team began the WBC with an upset over host South Korea before wins over Chinese Taipei and the Netherlands. Israel beat Cuba in the next round in Japan, but fell to Japan and the Netherlands handily.

Unlike most MLB players who spent their spring in Florida, Kelly got to experience two major Asian cities -- Seoul and Tokyo -- while getting his preseason at-bats.

"It was a great experience, trying the food and all that and seeing all the sights," Kelly said.

However, he wasn't too adventurous with trying the local cuisine compared to his teammates.

"Some of the guys were really trying to seek out the native food," Kelly said. "I wanted to do that as much as I could, but at the same time, you're still trying to get ready for baseball games in a tournament, so you've got to do what's best for your body.

"Chicken sandwiches for me were the way to go for the most part," he added with a laugh.

Kelly's participation with the squad began in the middle of 2016, when Peter Kurz, the President of the Israel Association of Baseball, emailed him and asked if he had a Jewish grandparent. Kelly's mother's side of the family is Jewish, making Kelly eligible.

Last year was also the end of Kelly's long road to the major leagues. Drafted by the Orioles in 2009 out of UC Davis, Kelly was traded multiple times, once straight up for current Brewers slugger Eric Thames before Thames went to Korea and back. Kelly wound up with the Mets and finally made his MLB debut two months shy of his 28th birthday. He played 39 games for the Mets at six different positions and got a hit in his only postseason at-bat, which came vs. Madison Bumgarner no less.

Kelly still had to make the Mets this spring, which could have made joining the WBC a tough decision. However, the organization was on board with Kelly playing in the tournament.

"It made it difficult, but I talked to the Mets about it and they were all for me going over there and still playing and getting experience," he said. "People were still watching, so once I got the go-ahead from them, it was an easy decision."

Kelly made the Mets out of the spring but had just one at-bat before he put on waivers and was claimed by the Blue Jays. Eight days later, he was traded to the Phillies. He has four hits (three doubles) in 19 at-bats with the Phillies and had the game-winning RBI single two weeks ago in the front end of the Phils' doubleheader with the Nationals.

He's the only player from Team Israel to have played in the majors this season. Ryan Lavarnway and former Mets 1B Ike Davis are in AAA while the roster also included former MLBers Nate Freiman, Sam Fuld and Jason Marquis.

While none of his WBC teammates have parlayed Team Israel's run into MLB time, Kelly still thinks the team caught the eye of people in the game.

"There was definitely a lot of fandom around our team," Kelly said. "A lot of people rallied around us, including people in front offices I think. Of Jewish descent or not, I think a lot of people liked what we did.

"Being a part of that definitely looks good for me, which is just an added bonus."

A healthy Nolan Patrick to Flyers? 'He won't let anybody down,' Brandon GM says

A healthy Nolan Patrick to Flyers? 'He won't let anybody down,' Brandon GM says

As he met with general manager Grant Armstrong, Nolan Patrick had just finished an injury-marred junior season.

The 18-year-old missed the WHL playoffs and was limited to 33 games because of two separate injuries. He underwent sports hernia surgery the offseason prior, a major impediment to his summer training. He never quite "caught up to the year," as Armstrong put it.

"I don't think he really ever got himself into a situation where he was 100 percent," the Brandon Wheat Kings GM said in a phone interview last week with CSNPhilly.com.

But none of that was about to crack Patrick's confidence.

"When we had our exit meetings, he told me he was going to play in the NHL," Armstrong said. "I wished him the best of luck and I expect that's where he'll be next year."

Where he could be is Philadelphia sporting Flyers orange. Patrick and Nico Hischier are the consensus top two picks for the June 23-24 NHL entry draft. The Flyers, of course, thanks to a stroke of good luck, will be happily sitting at No. 2 overall. The Devils will make Ron Hextall's decision much easier when they pick at No. 1.

The Canadian Patrick and Swiss-born Hischier are both centers. Coming into the season, Patrick was viewed as the draft's top dog, but his health and Hischier's rise have tightened the race.

Will the injuries cause apprehension?

"I think there's no concern at all," Armstrong said. "Injuries are a part of the game and I don't see it being an issue for Nolan at all. He trains well, he works hard at it and rehabs properly. I don't see it being an issue and currently, I think he's at 100 percent."

Despite the hampered summer and shortened season, Patrick showed why he's so heralded, compiling 46 points in 33 games for the Wheat Kings, his third year with the junior club. He scored 20 goals and collected 26 assists. Why that might not be mind-blowing is because Patrick had 102 points in 2015-16 on 41 goals and 61 assists for an astounding plus-51 rating. He went on to record 30 points (13 goals, 17 assists) in 21 playoff games, leading Brandon to its first WHL title in 20 years alongside current Flyers defenseman Ivan Provorov.

Similar to Provorov, Patrick's hockey smarts belie his age.

"His presence on the ice, he just thinks the game, he puts himself in positions to be successful all the time," Armstrong said. "He's almost above the ice in his thinking aspect. He sees the game so well, he's a student of the game, he understands and puts himself in positions of success. That hasn't changed, it's only getting better for him.

"He's a difference-maker."

Armstrong joined the Wheat Kings last summer but had scouted and seen plenty of Patrick as Armstrong worked the previous four seasons for the WHL's Victoria Royals.

"He's a very elite player with a tremendous hockey sense," Armstrong said. "I think that's his biggest attribute is he thinks the game so well, he thinks it ahead of what's really happening on the ice a lot of the times. He's a player that's really starting to come into his own. 

"This next season will be a real opportunity for him to showcase his elite hockey sense and his athleticism and all the things that combine to make him a great player."

It appears Patrick, who has great size at 6-foot-3, 198 pounds, is ready to showcase those traits at the NHL level. His future club will ultimately decide that in training camp.

"We would like to think we know that, but until the kid comes in and shows you what he can do," Hextall said earlier this month. "You make an educated judgment and then you go from there. A player has to come in and prove that he's ready and at this age not many are, so we'll wait and see which way [the player] goes from there."

Armstrong said there's constant communication between Brandon and NHL teams throughout a season and that it escalates this time of year as the draft nears.

What about with the Flyers?

"The Flyers are a great organization and obviously we have ties to their GM," Armstrong said. "It's a good fit and they know what's going on.

"They're dialed into what's going on and they have all kinds of ways to communicate with people."

While Patrick may not jump off the charts with Connor McDavid-like scoring ability, he prides himself on being complete. Armstrong said Patrick models his game after Kings center Anze Kopitar, a two-time Stanley Cup champion and 2015-16 Selke Trophy winner as the NHL's top defensive forward.

It's the do-it-all mentality Armstrong believes was special, night in and night out.

"Just the way he makes small plays in a game that would set up a teammate," he said. "He plays a 200-foot game, he's coming back hard and supporting the D in the defensive zone. Switching to offense, he's quick and he does things that make him such a great player.

"I think everybody thinks that a No. 1 or 2 centerman is going to be completely focused on the offensive side, but no, he's very committed to the defensive side of the puck — I think that's one thing that's a little bit misunderstood about him. He's got such an ability to play in any situation — killing penalties, late in the game, taking big faceoffs, that's his game."

Armstrong extolled Patrick for making everyone around him better on the Wheat Kings.

If that's with the Flyers next, Armstrong believes you won't be disappointed.

"I think they just have to be patient and allow the player to grow. He won't let anybody down," Armstrong said. "I just think he's an elite talent with an elite sense for the game. At some point, he'll be a great two-way centerman in the league. He'll put up offensive numbers. They won't be in the elite category, but he'll be a guy that'll chip away at his game, he'll produce. You just have to take your time and be patient."