Caps Fans Litter the Ice, Take Aim at Players After Flyers Win

Caps Fans Litter the Ice, Take Aim at Players After Flyers Win


In today's installment of Fans Behaving Badly, we bring you the Washington Capitals' faithful, who last night put a black eye on an otherwise great series by raining trash onto the ice after the game. While the Flyers were celebrating, Joffrey Lupul was hit by a small pizza box, and during an interview with Steve Coates, Jeff Carter was hit with a plastic beer bottle.

Now, Caps fans aren't alone in their transgressions, not by any stretch
of the imagination. Phillies fans did the same thing after the second
game
of the season, Flyers fans dumped beer on the Caps owner Ted Leonsis's son, and we all know what happens when the Mets fans are
let out of their cages
. But can the national media please stop perpetuating the stereotype that Philadelphia fans are classless, when clearly this stuff is happening everywhere?

Video of Carter getting a bottle to the head, and responding appropriately, after the jump.

Takes a real man to throw something at a guy with his back turned to him. It's a shame, because the Caps fans had taken the opportunity in this series to announce their presence to the league, filling the seats with red bodies, a trend we honestly hope continues from the start of the season next year, not just the end. The Caps are an exciting team led by the best player in the world, and an energized DC fanbase will be great for the league.

Here's a clip of the ice surface after the game, with some choice language audible.

For Shayne Gostisbehere, Dave Hakstol, Stadium Series brings back cherished memories

For Shayne Gostisbehere, Dave Hakstol, Stadium Series brings back cherished memories

PITTSBURGH -- For Flyers coach Dave Hakstol and defenseman Shayne Gostisbehere, tonight’s Stadium Series game between the Flyers and Penguins brings back memories.
 
Hakstol coached North Dakota in an outdoor hockey in college, while Gostisbehere participated in one as a freshman at Union College.
 
For Hakstol, however, this whole idea of outdoor hockey began when he was growing up in central Alberta in the small town of Drayton Valley.
 
“I think everybody’s got great memories of growing up outdoors,” Hakstol said. “We had a back creek that we could shovel off. I’m sure everybody could sit back and tell you stories of playing on the outdoor rinks.
 
“For me, most recently, I’ve got two kids growing up playing on outdoor rinks, backyard rinks. It’s pretty cool. It takes you right back to the heart of the game.”
 
Hakstol’s outdoor coaching experience came during a game between Nebraska-Omaha and his North Dakota squad in 2013 at the “Mutual of Omaha Battles on Ice.”
 
“I don’t know how to describe it,” Hakstol said of the event. “It’s just a different feel. It’s an ideal scenario.”
 
He said while tonight's game is special, it’s still about the points, first and foremost.
 
“You are cognizant of everything that surrounds the event and the game,” Hakstol said. “Yet for us, it’s two points. We’re fighting for every point here. That is going to paramount.”

Gostisbehere played at Fenway Park in 2012 for Union in a game against Harvard. That night, Union won, 2-0, to become the first ECAC club to ever win outdoors.
 
“I played at Fenway Park against Harvard and it was fun,” Gostisbehere said. “That was my freshman year and the only one I ever played in.
 
“Good crowd. It wasn’t packed obviously, but it was a night game. The ice was really good. It was really cold, too. It was pretty cool.”
 
As warm as it was Friday here -- a historic 78 degrees -- temperatures will begin in the 40s tonight at Heinz Field and then drop. It rained this morning but has since ceased.
 
“The biggest thing for me was to take a second, look around,” Gostisbehere said, admitting he failed to do that in college and won’t make that mistake again.
 
“Just cherish it a little bit. You are so focused on the game, it’s tough. That was biggest thing for me. It was such a blur. Just being in college and having the opportunity to play at Fenway Park was pretty awesome.”

This will the Flyers first-ever outdoor affair in Pittsburgh.
 
“It’s pretty exciting and I’m glad to be part of it,” Gostisbehere said.

What do Justin Anderson, Tiago Splitter bring to Sixers?

What do Justin Anderson, Tiago Splitter bring to Sixers?

Justin Anderson and Tiago Splitter arrived in Philadelphia on Friday for their first game with the team. Anderson, in fact, got there just a few hours before tipoff Friday after missing the bag check-in window on his first flight and experiencing a delay on his second one.

The Sixers' project them have very different roles -- one as a veteran voice and the other as a versatile contributor. Both explained what they will bring to the Sixers.

Justin Anderson
Anderson was just getting over the departure of his veteran teammate, Deron Williams, when he was informed he, too, was leaving the Mavs. Anderson had met with the Sixers during the pre-draft process and made a memorable mark on Brett Brown.

"When I interviewed him a few years ago, he was polished, he was articulate, he was Virginia, he was tough," Brown said.

Anderson was impressed by Brown mentioning parts of their meeting when the coach called him after the trade.  

"When I found it was here, I was very excited because it's a young organization that wants to get out and play hard, play fast and try to make change and try to turn things around," Anderson said. "I want to blend right in like a chameleon."

The 6-foot-6 Anderson played point guard through power forward on the Mavericks. Brown envisions him sliding into a backup four spot behind Dario Saric at times. Brown said Anderson will need to work on his shot, but considers him to be "developable."

"Just tough, hard play," Anderson said of his game. "Offensively, being able to shoot the ball, space the floor. Being able to use my athleticism, get to the rim, get fouled. Defensively, just being able to rotate, block shots, guard best player, take on challenges and do whatever I can."

Tiago Splitter
Splitter has been sidelined all season after undergoing hip surgery one year ago Saturday. He still is dealing with what he describes as "muscle imbalance" including his calves. Splitter had been participating in full practices with the Hawks prior to the trade and would like to return this season.

In the meantime, Splitter can share his title-winning experience with the younger Sixers. He captured a title with the Spurs while Brown was on the coaching staff.

"I know what a team needs to be championship caliber," Splitter said. "I'm not saying I'm going to come here and change anything now; I'm just going to see what I see and help the young guys to develop into great players. There are a lot of great players here already. You guys have seen how the team is playing some nights here, it’s unbelievable. They just have to do that every night on a consistent basis. I hope I can help them, they can help me also get back on the court."

Splitter could share some of his fundamentals with the bigs.

"He's just a blue collar work house that is an elite screener, an elite roller," Brown said. "I know in my Spurs days with him, he was as good as we had coached on the assist from the roll."

Splitter’s time with the Sixers most likely will be brief. His contract expires this and the Sixers will try to help him get healthy to approach the free agent market.

"As far as long term, him fitting in and being part of something, I don’t see that at this date," president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said. "But once again, it's certainly something that we'll look at if he happens to fit. I think his anticipation, though, is just landing somewhere, getting the chance to finish out the season, showing that he's healthy and then setting himself up for an opportunity to play somewhere next year."

What about Bogut?
Andrew Bogut was included in the trade from the Mavericks with Anderson. The veteran center will not be with the Sixers for at least a week, according to Colangelo, and may not come to Philadelphia at all.

"He's got some personal things that he's dealing with at home, family-related," Colangelo said. "There's a possibility that he'll want to go play somewhere in the playoffs. In order to accomplish that, that would take some sort of a buyout."