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Chris Pronger Reacts to Flyers Blockbusters, Likes Fishing

Chris Pronger Reacts to Flyers Blockbusters, Likes Fishing

We polled you earlier on whether you thought the Flyers were closer to winning a Stanley Cup after Jeff Carter and Mike Richards were traded away and Ilya Bryzgalov was locked up long-term. During his conference call this afternoon, Chris Pronger was asked the same question.

Is the team closer to winning a Cup now?
 
“I don’t know.  I haven’t really thought about that too much.  I just heard about the trades last night so I haven’t really put a whole lot of thought to it, I’m up in the bush with my kids, fishing.  I haven’t put the Xs and Os together – I’m sure you guys have looked at it seven ways from Sunday and tried to figure out who wins or loses.  At the end of the day, as I said before, having been traded a number of times, it’s always difficult.  They both played their hearts out in Philly, but sometimes as I said, you’ve got to make tough decisions and you’ve got to make moves, and sometimes it may hurt and may feel like you’re making your team worse to make it better," Pronger said. [full transcript below]

What was your reaction to yesterday’s events? 

“I think when you make a move like that to get a goalie and you’ve got to pay him, you’ve got to get the money somewhere.  Time and again in the salary cap era, you’ve got to give to get.  Unfortunately for us, those two guys were traded.  It sucks as a teammate.  You hate to see guys go.  They were for all intents and purposes the face of the franchise for four of those six years, if not for the six years they were here.  I’m sure it’s tough for them.  The Philadelphia Flyers, it’s all they really know.  I’ve gone through it a number of times, and sometimes a move is healthy for you.” 

Were you able to reach out to Jeff or Mike? 

“I’m going to give them a call today.  Having gone through it a number of times, you kind of need a day to gather your thoughts and kind of get your wits about you.  It’s certainly not an easy thing.  I think it makes it a little bit easier that they’re both single and don’t have to lug around kids and logistically and that stuff, but it’s still very tough to be traded and I’m sure both of them have mixed emotions.” 

Is the team closer to winning a Cup now? 

 “I don’t know.  I haven’t really thought about that too much.  I just heard about the trades last night so I haven’t really put a whole lot of thought to it, I’m up in the bush with my kids, fishing.  I haven’t put the Xs and Os together – I’m sure you guys have looked at it seven ways from Sunday and tried to figure out who wins or loses.  At the end of the day, as I said before, having been traded a number of times, it’s always difficult.  They both played their hearts out in Philly, but sometimes as I said, you’ve got to make tough decisions and you’ve got to make moves, and sometimes it may hurt and may feel like you’re making your team worse to make it better.”  

Does this team have a better locker room today? 

“I don’t know.  I don’t really know those other guys they brought in.  I played against Wayne Simmonds for one or two years when I was in Anaheim, but other than that, when you play on the East Coast, you don’t really play the West very often, and vice-versa.  When I was coming out here I didn’t really know many of the guys here, because I’d played in the West pretty much my whole career.  I can’t really speak to that right now, having no luxury to know any of the three guys we picked up.” 

Did you think there was a problem in the room? 

 “I don’t think anybody would say a year ago when we went to the Stanley Cup Final that there was a chemistry problem.  [That year] I think our play was very inconsistent, and we were trying to find ourselves as a team with a new coach and a new system.  I think the players were trying to find where they needed to be and how we needed to play to be successful as a group.  Last year, you’re coming off a tough defeat in the Stanley Cup Final in overtime, we got off to a good start, and nobody seemed to think we had a problem then.  As the season wore on, for whatever reason, we just didn’t turn that corner and continue to get better and peak at the right time.  That’s disappointing, and it’s tough.  I don’t think there was necessarily a rift, I think we just needed more life in the locker room.  It all has to do with your play on the ice.  If you’re playing well on the ice, there’s never any questions as to who’s doing what or is there a rift, does this guy like that guy, and all of the rest of the stuff that gets thrown out.  If you play well on the ice, nobody wants to write about that because everything’s going good.” 

Do you want to be the captain? 

 “You know what, I haven’t put much thought in it to be honest with you.  This is all very, very fresh to a lot of us.  Obviously I’d have to talk to Homer and Lavi and see what their thoughts are, and kind of go from there.  You don’t nominate yourself.  I’ve never been part of a team where somebody nominates himself.  I think that may be a little bit premature to start talking about stuff like that.  It’s one day after two huge trades on our team and in the history of the Flyers, so I don’t think that’s in anybody’s minds right now.”

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

A closer look at Nick Williams' surprising, impressive rookie season

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A closer look at Nick Williams' surprising, impressive rookie season

With less than two weeks to go before baseball season ends, now's a good time to begin looking back at the most surprising developments, stats and trends for the Phillies in 2017.

In no particular order, we'll run these throughout the fall, starting today with Nick Williams' success against left-handed pitching.

• • •

Williams has had an impressive rookie season overall but his success against same-handed pitching has been the biggest surprise in Year 1.

In the upper minor leagues in 2015 and 2016, Williams hit .223 with a .583 OPS.

As a major-leaguer, Williams has hit .282 against lefties with a .774 OPS, a double, two triples and two homers.

Makes me think back to a conversation with Williams in the summer of 2016, when things started to click for him vs. lefties.

"I've been seeing lefties a lot better lately," Williams said then. "A lot of them kind of do the same thing to me and that helps. I just want to master, really figure out what I'm trying to do and what they're trying to do to me. I didn't like when [managers] thought I couldn't hit a lefty and they would call a guy in from the bullpen just to pitch to me. It bothered me, I didn't like that, them thinking it could just take a lefty to get me out. I worked on it, worked on it, and I got better at it.

"Breaking balls away, sometimes they try to come in, but usually if they throw me a breaking ball that's a strike, it's a good pitch to hit. There's a couple times you can tip your hat to them for hitting a certain spot, but really, when lefties throw me a breaking ball for a strike, it's a good pitch to hit. Just staying patient and the one that's an inch off, two inches off, just bite your lip and take."

Williams won't place high in NL Rookie of the Year voting because it's been an impressive class with Cody Bellinger (the lock), Rhys Hoskins, Paul DeJong, Josh Bell and Kyle Freeland. (I think the Padres' Dinelson Lamet will be the third-best player among that group next year.) In other years, he'd be more of a top-five consideration.

Consistency over 300 PAs

Williams' strong summer has been overshadowed by Hoskins-mania but his production has been consistent.

Through 298 plate appearances with the Phillies, Williams has hit .287/.339/.478 with 14 doubles, four triples, 10 homers and 48 RBIs. 

Project that over 162 games and you get 32 doubles, 9 triples, 23 homers and 109 RBIs.

That doesn't mean that if Williams plays 162 next season he'll absolutely hit all of those marks but it's an idea of what a full, healthy season from him might look like.

"Nick Williams looks like the Phillies' rightfielder of the next six years" couldn't have been said with nearly as much certitude just six months ago.

Still think the Phillies waited too long?

I'd argue this is more indicative of the Phils' front office moving Williams along the right way.

They wanted him to show more plate selection before bringing up to the majors and he obliged, walking 8 times in his final 13 games at Triple after walking 8 times in his previous 65 games.

(Since this is the internet and at least a few will be inclined to label me a Phillies apologist for those previous two paragraphs, I do think they waited at least two months too long with Hoskins, maybe more.)

Williams just turned 24 on Sept. 8. He celebrated with a three-run homer off of Max Scherzer and a 4-for-5 night at Nationals Park. 

He's shown power to all fields, and though he's never been much of a base stealer, his speed stands out.

Finding a decent comp

So Williams has hit .287/.339/.478 in his first 300 plate appearances. 

Before this season, Justin Upton hit .268/.347/.472 over a decade (wow, does time fly).

Pretty similar, right?

Back to that 162-game projection for Williams of 32 doubles, 9 triples, 23 homers and 109 RBIs.

From 2007-16, Upton averaged 32 doubles, 5 triples, 27 homers and 86 RBIs per 162 games.

Williams' 300 plate appearances are far, far different from Upton's 6,000. But if Williams can start hot next season and remain consistent throughout 2018, a left-handed hitting Justin Upton with a skill set to bat second through sixth ain't bad.

So, is this sustainable?

Williams has a .376 batting average on balls in play. The league average is .300, so some will be quick to holler out that Williams will regress.

But keep in mind that just because the league average BABIP is .300 doesn't mean all players end up there. From 2014-17 in the minors, William's batting average on balls in play fell in the .355 to .365 range.

And this season, there are 33 players with a BABIP of at least .350. So it's not necessarily a major fluke that Williams has hit the way he has to this point. 

When putting the ball in play, fast players like Williams get on base more often than those with average speed. Williams already has 10 infield hits.

Next April and May are going to be really important for Williams. He'll start facing pitchers for the second, third and fourth times, and the rest of the league will have a better idea of how to get him out. These early returns are promising, though.