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Comment of the Week Sponsored By Misconduct Tavern

Comment of the Week Sponsored By Misconduct Tavern

Yo, people. Don't forget that our Thursday night Eagles Watch Party at Misconduct Tavern is now less than two weeks away. Come join us on Thursday, December 1st at 15th and Locust to enjoy $3 beer specials and watch the Iggles take on the Seahawks. It'll be a grand old time drinking with fellow Interneters.

Here's this week's winner of a $40 gift card to Misconduct Tavern. Congrats to Irish07 for ripping the Eagles:

Good article. I think you're right to point out that the offense -
particularly Vick and Jackson/Maclin - has not gotten their fair share
of criticism for their play so far this season. And the use of stats is
great and a welcome addition to the site. However, even though you
admit that the play calling has been curious at times, I don't think you
attribute enough blame on the guys calling the shots - Reid and
Mornhinwig.

Without doing the necessary research to back it up, it
seems that teams are making a concerted effort to take away the big play
and we haven't properly adjusted. Really, I can't recall any big plays
downfield to either Maclin or Jackson this year. Teams are basically
daring us to dink and dunk our way down the field and we have not shown
the patience to execute this type of offense with any sort of
regularity.

Further, by taking away quick strikes, teams are
exacerbating two chronic problem areas for Reid coached offenses - red
zone efficiency and third/fourth and short situations. I mean really,
has a team ever led the league in rushing and finishing in the bottom
quarter of teams in red zone touchdown percentage before? Of course,
when an offense struggles this much you cannot just blame the coaching
staff. Maclin and Jackson have dropped way too many balls and Vick
still takes too much time in the pocket and makes an unacceptable amount
of bad decisions. But I think we've been "figured
out" to some extent but have been reluctant to adjust.

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
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• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
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• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

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Eagles players plan to lock arms before game, ask fans to join them

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Eagles players plan to lock arms before game, ask fans to join them

Before today's home opener, the Eagles will lock arms in a showing of unity and ask that fans join them, several players tweeted.

Safety Malcolm Jenkins, who tweeted first on Sunday morning, participated in a near-season-long demonstration during the national anthem last year and has continued that demonstration into this season.

His demonstration -- raising his right fist -- is an attempt to further a conversation about racism and social injustice in the United States.

Sunday's demonstration of locking arms is a response to President Donald Trump's comments on Friday night, encouraging NFL owners to release players who protest during the national anthem.

“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired. He’s fired!' Trump said.

“You know, some owner is going to do that. He’s going to say, ‘That guy that disrespects our flag, he’s fired.’ And that owner, they don’t know it [but] they’ll be the most popular person in this country.”

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie released a statement on Saturday night to support his players' attempts to call attention to injustice (see story). While it wasn't as strong against Trump's comments as some other statements from NFL owners, Lurie has been consistent in supporting his players in this area. Jenkins, Chris Long and Torrey Smith, some of the Eagles' more outspoken players on topics of race and injustice, have said Lurie has been very supportive.

During the game in London on Sunday morning, Jaguars players and Ravens players on both sidelines locked arms during the anthem. Jaguars owner Shad Khan joined them.

Last September, when Jenkins first began his demonstration, head coach Doug Pederson said he would join in if his players held some sort of team-wide demonstration.

"If it was team-wide, if they wanted to do something team-wide, I’d definitely be for that," Pederson said last September. "I think it shows unity and there’s no division that way, and I think it sends a great message that from our standpoint, the National Football League and the platform and the individuals, we love this country and what it represents and the flag and the national anthem and everything. Listen, we’re not perfect, obviously, and for us to stand united that way, I’d go for that.”

Through the first two games of the 2017 season, Jenkins has raised his fist during the anthem, while Long and Rodney McLeod placed their arms on him in a showing of support.