Dom Brown Delivers With Ninth-Inning Walkoff, Makes Jonathan Papelbon Very Happy

Dom Brown Delivers With Ninth-Inning Walkoff, Makes Jonathan Papelbon Very Happy

This one had "bummer" written all over it. The Phillies scrapped to a 4-2 lead through five, and Antonio Bastardo cleaned up a Mike Adams-induced eighth inning jam to get the ball to Jonathan Papelbon in the 9th with a one-run lead still in tact. Pap's perfect season looked to remain in tact with an easy first two outs and an 0-2 count on Nats pinch-hitter Chad Tracy, a .141 hitter to that point. But wouldn't you know it? That darned Tracy clocked a fly ball just over the wall in right, and Pap had his first blown save of the season, another back-breaker in a recent stretch of tough baseball for the Philly Phaithful.

However, a leadoff hit from Ben Revere in the bottom of the ninth, and a well-executed hit-and-run on a Jimmy Rollins single, and suddenly the Phils had a chance to let Papelbon off the hook. Domonic Brown would do just that, delivering a base knock up the middle with two outs to score Revere, and getting Pap his first W--his first decision of any kind, actually--on the season. Final score: Phils 5, Nats 4.

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Though the shaky bullpen work robbed him of his first win in a Phillies uniform, John Lannan overcame a shaky start to give the Phils five solid innings of work, allowing just two runs on six innings and a walk--about as good an outing as we could expect from our fifth (sixth?) starter against his old ballclub in his first game since going down with a knee injury. Michael Stutes held down the fort with two innings of spotless work, before Adams and Papelbon gummed up the works late.

The real heroics of the night came on the other side of the ball, particularly from the aforementioned Revere and the forever-streaky Ryan Howard. Ben Revere is in the midst of easily the best stretch of his thusfar shaky debut season for the Phils, going 2-5 tonight with a steal and the game-winning run, stretching his hit streak to eight games, double the length of any other such streak he's had as a Phillie. As a leadoff guy who doesn't walk much and basically hits for zero power, Revere has to at least hit near .300 to be any kind of useful to the club, so it's encouraging to see him at least get up into the mid-.270s after spending much of the season struggling to even get to the quarter mark.

Howard was undoubtedly player of the game, however, going 3-3 with a walk and a homer--his first for the month of June, somewhat depressingly. Though Howard's power has been disturbingly sapped of late, he's still seeing the ball remarkably well, hitting .346 for the month with nine walks, after hitting just .254 with ten walks total for the season before June. He may not ever be the home-run masher that he was in the late '00s again, but as long as he's squaring up the ball this consistently, drawing walks and not striking out too much (under one K a game for the month, no small feat for Ryno), he can still be a net positive for the team offensively.

And while you might not say Dom busted out of his mini-slump this game--any game where he doesn't homer is still something of a subconscious disappointment at this point--he certainly had his most productive outing in a while. After going seven games without collecting multiple hits, Dom went 2-4 tonight with another walk--his ninth this month, after going all of May without a BB--including the game-winning hit. He did have a rough bases-loaded punchout in the third inning, which ended in the ugliest swing-and-miss third strike we've seen from the Domonator since his hot streak commenced last month, but it's still mostly good swings for Dom, and hey, any night at the plate that ends with you being tackled by Jon Papelbon and whip-creamed by Freddy Galvis is a pretty good night.

One final note on this one: Charlie Manuel again substituted Michael Martinez for Ryan Howard on the basepaths late in this one, with Howard on second with no outs and a 4-3 lead, and it again came back to bite the Phils as Martinez was left stranded at second, and Howard's batting spot came up in a critical moment in the ninth, with Charlie forced to go with the super-sparingly-used reserve Steve Lerud at the plate, rather than the guy who went 3-3 with a homer and a walk in his first four PAs. Lerud quickly whiffed, failing to cash in Ben Revere from third, and Dom was left to save the day with two outs. I understand why Charlie goes with those late-game substitutions, but I never like it, and hopefully another night like tonight will convince him that the risk really outweighs the reward when it comes to pinch-running for your big bats late in the game.

Anyway, a good early blow for the Phils in this NL East three-gamer, bringing the Phils back within a game of Washington for second in the division. Cliff Lee takes the hill tomorrow night against Ross Detwiler with a chance to pull the Phils to even--though I doubt many would have guessed at season's start that the two teams would be vying for second in the East with a couple of sub-.500 records. We'd take it for now, anyway.

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Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

In late December, I was invited to play in a pick-up hockey game with some other members of the local sports media community. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I was one of only two women there that day. Even now, female ice hockey players aren’t exactly common.

After the game, a reporter I’ve known a while — a guy I like a lot — said to me: “Don’t take this the wrong way, but you skate like a man.” I didn’t take it wrong, of course; he meant it as a compliment. The reporter wanted nothing more than to tell me I’d impressed him.

I thought about this exchange a lot in the days that followed. Had someone told me I played hockey like a boy when I was 15, I would have worn that description like a badge. Hell yeah, 15-year-old Sarah would have thought, I do play like a boy. I’m as tough as a boy. I’m as fierce and competitive as any boy on my team. I would have reveled in it, just as I reveled in a similar label I’d received even earlier in my adolescence: tomboy.

Yeah, I was a tomboy. I hung around with the neighborhood boys, riding bikes between each other’s houses or catching salamanders in the creek that ran through town. I loved sports, and my bedroom walls — papered with newspaper clippings and photos of Flyers players — were a far cry from the pink-tinged rooms that belonged to the girls at school. 

As much as I could, I dressed like a boy too, even once cutting the sleeves off of an oversized T-shirt before I went out to rollerblade with our next-door neighbors. My grandmother, who was visiting at the time, pulled me aside to tell me I really ought to dress more appropriately. I rolled my eyes.

I was a tomboy, and I loved the word and everything it stood for. I felt pride in my tomboyishness, believing that the things I liked — the things boys liked — were clearly better than the things stereotypically left to the girls.

I’m almost embarrassed to admit it was a conversation with a 15-year-old that changed my perspective, just a few days after my reporter friend had compared my hockey skills to those of a man. I sat down with Mo’ne Davis, the female Little League pitching phenom, for this very project. I asked her if she identified as a tomboy, and she shrugged. Not really, she said. Maybe other people wanted to define her that way, she suggested, but that wasn’t how she viewed things.

You know that record scratch sound effect they play on TV or in the movies? The one that denotes a sort of “wait … what?!” moment? That’s what happened in my head. Mo’ne Davis, the girl who played on the boys’ team and excelled, didn’t consider herself a tomboy?

Something clicked in my head after that. I’ve long identified as a feminist, and I’ve been a big supporter of girls in sports for as long as I can remember. I coach girls hockey, I’ve spoken at schools and camps about playing and working in sports as a woman. For some reason, though, it took a 15-year-old shrugging her shoulders at the label “tomboy” to take the power out of the word for me. Why does one have to be a tomboy, when one can simply be a girl who kicks ass? How had I never considered this before?

In many ways (and especially in sports) if something is male, it’s considered superior. It goes beyond just the things kids like to do, and it’s all old news. It’s also something I’m ashamed to admit I’ve bought into for practically all of my life. But no longer. How can I help change the narrative if I’m too busy playing along with it?

And if I could do it over, when that reporter approached me after our hockey game to tell me I skated like a man, I would have smiled, shook my head and said: Nah. But I skate like a darn good woman.

Flyers-Capitals 5 things: Washington on ridiculous roll into Wells Fargo Center

Flyers-Capitals 5 things: Washington on ridiculous roll into Wells Fargo Center

Flyers (28-24-7) vs. Capitals (39-12-7)
8 p.m. on NBCSN, CSNPhilly.com and the NBC Sports App

After finding some offense to finish up a 1-2-0 road trip, the Flyers return home for a not-so-glorious welcome when they host the NHL-leading Washington Capitals on Wednesday night at the Wells Fargo Center.

We’ll get into that and more with five things to know:

1. Capping things off
What’s the Flyers’ reward for salvaging the final game of a road swing through Canada? A date with the Capitals, who are the NHL’s hottest team since New Year’s Eve, and by a landslide.

Just how dominant has Washington been?

Dating back to Dec. 31, the Capitals are 19-3-2 and have scored an incomprehensible 104 goals in those 24 games. That’s 4.33 goals per game, while yielding only 50 markers over that stretch.

Meanwhile, the Flyers have scored an NHL-low 40 goals since New Year’s Eve and allowed 62 for an Eastern Conference-worst goal differential of minus-22.

Washington, coming off its first back-to-back defeats since Dec. 27-29, has lost three straight games only once this season.

2. A Ghost sighting
On Sunday, for the first time in close to four months, we saw the Shayne Gostisbehere from the Calder Memorial Trophy (top rookie) runner-up season last year.

The sophomore blueliner delivered his first three-point game of his career to ignite the Flyers to a 3-2 win over the Canucks.

Although Gostisbehere has made it clear he’s focused on his defensive game, the Flyers are a different animal when he’s generating offensive chances at 5-on-5 and the power play.

“He had his confidence and a little bit of swagger,” Wayne Simmonds said of Gostisbehere’s performance Sunday.

“Ghost has had his ups and downs this year, but he's a heck of a player and has unbelievable skill. He can be a catalyst offensively for us, that’s for sure.”

3. Good cage match
This one makes for an intriguing goalie matchup between Michal Neuvirth and Braden Holtby, who were once battling for the net in Washington.

Holtby is having another stud season after winning the 2015-16 Vezina Trophy (top goalie). Among all netminders, he is tied for first in goals-against average (2.01) and shutouts (seven), while he hasn’t been beaten in regulation since Dec. 27.

The 27-year-old blanked the Flyers twice in the 2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs and stopped 149 of 154 shots over the first-round series that the Capitals won in six games.

Neuvirth hasn’t been too shabby himself, starting eight of the Flyers’ last 10 games. Aside from a bad showing in a 6-3 loss to the Oilers, Neuvirth has not surrendered more than two goals in any other outing during that span.

A 2006 second-round pick of Washington, Neuvirth was brilliant last postseason against his former club, making 103 saves on 105 shots faced to get the Flyers two victories.

4. Keep an eye on ...
Flyers: Pierre-Edouard Bellemare can be crucial in these types of games. The fourth-line forward often sees work against the opposition’s top offensive threats and is the Flyers’ most important piece to the penalty kill. Bellemare has played 16-plus minutes in both meetings with the Capitals this season, while the PK is 15 for 17 in February and tied for the NHL’s third-fewest goals against this month.

Capitals: T.J. Oshie is such an underrated asset for Washington. The right winger, who played his college hockey at North Dakota under Flyers coach Dave Hakstol, leads the NHL with a 22.8 shooting percentage, a big reason why the Capitals are scoring 3.34 goals per game, good for second most in hockey. Oshie has 26 points (13 goals, 13 assists) in his past 22 games and is a plus-24 on the season.

5. This and that
• Neuvirth has just two career regular-season matchups against the Capitals, going 1-0-0 with a 2.44 goals-against average and .914 save percentage.

• Holtby is 6-4-7 with a 2.71 goals-against average and .911 save percentage in 18 lifetime matchups with the Flyers.

• The Flyers are three points out of the Eastern Conference’s second wild-card spot, trailing the Panthers, Bruins and Islanders, all of whom have 66 points.

• Simmonds has four goals in his last five games.

• Claude Giroux has two points (one goal, one assist) in his previous 10 games.

• Washington ranks first in the NHL with a plus-69 goal differential.

• Jordan Weal (upper-body injury) is expected to miss his second straight game.