Donovan McNabb Is Too Cool for School

Donovan McNabb Is Too Cool for School

Ordinarily, I don't weigh in too heavy on our old friend Donovan anymore. As some readers have astutely pointed out, he's gone, out of our lives forever. However, this story from last week was a little too juicy to simply ignore, and just maybe serves as a glimpse into what's gone wrong for the former Eagles quarterback.

Per PFT, a talk radio show in D.C. citing unnamed sources claimed last Thursday that McNabb refused to wear a wristband with the plays on it, allegedly because he was afraid it would hurt his image. As incredibly ridiculous as that may sound (or not I guess), Donovan has yet to deny the story, and Rex Grossman has since all but confirmed it.

“Obviously Donovan didn’t like it.  He didn’t want to do it,” Grossman said.  “I’m not sure that was a major issue.  I’m not sure that was a big problem between him and the coaching staff.”
Wristbands are a fairly common device for quarterbacks. Through a little independent research, I noticed Mike Vick wearing one last season. So did Kevin Kolb. Hell, Tom Brady wears one. And while Donovan has not worn one for much of, or any of his NFL career, he certainly had them at Syracuse before the Eagles made him the second overall pick in the draft.

Whatever the reason is for not wearing one now, it's stupid. The wristband is only there to help, so there really is no excuse for making a big deal over it. If it's a way to show displeasure with the coaching staff, there are other ways he could demonstrate that. If it's about his image, well, I'm pretty sure his play this past year did enough damage in that department.

And Donovan better get with the program soon, that is if he intends to play again in 2011. The idea has been floated that we may have seen the last of McNabb. He'll likely demand a contract that far exceeds his value at this stage of his career, which is one of a temporary solution under center. Forget image, he'll have to swallow his pride the next time he puts his name on the dotted line.

Even then, the fact of the matter is once he gets to Minnesota, or wherever the coaches want to bring their franchise QB along slowly, the expectation would likely be--get ready for it--he wear a friggin wristband. McNabb is not the offensive wizard he seems to think he is, and with a shortened off-season to get up to speed in another new offense, the wristband may become a necessity.

Honestly, I never thought I'd feel this way, but thankfully he's not our problem anymore. McNabb was a very good quarterback here for a long time, and he helped carry this fanbase to some awesome highs. Nobody is dismissing his accomplishments.

What's sadly become apparent though, and more than ever since his departure, is this attitude as if he feels he's better than he really is. But Donovan McNabb is not above being traded, not above ending his career as a journeyman, and he's not above wearing a damn wrist band. At least he shouldn't be if he wants to still be taken seriously.

>> Report: McNabb refused to wear a wristband with plays [PFT]
>> Grossman says, what else, he should be starter [Washington Examiner]
>> Mosher: All signs pointing to end of McNabb's career [News Journal]

Doug Pederson: Dak Prescott knew he didn't have to win by himself

Doug Pederson: Dak Prescott knew he didn't have to win by himself

For the most part, Carson Wentz had a pretty successful rookie season. 

Sure, the Eagles finished with a 7-9 record, but Wentz did enough to continue the franchise's belief that he is indeed the quarterback of the future. 

Another guy in Dallas did the same thing with the Cowboys. Actually, Dak Prescott had an even more impressive rookie season, leading the Cowboys to 13 wins, while winning the Offensive Rookie of the Year award. 

Prescott, a fourth-round pick, had a great year, but didn't try to do too much. And that's what impressed Eagles head coach Doug Pederson the most. 

"[Prescott] understood this right away, that he didn't have to win the game for them," Pederson said on The Doomsday Podcast, hosted by Matt Mosley and Ed Werder. (Pederson also talked about running the Rocky steps). "He knew that he had a good defense, a tremendous offensive line, a great runner, he had some veteran players that he could rely on and he learned that early. As soon as he had the opportunity to play and that was early, from Day 1. 

"That's something that a young quarterback, sometimes it takes them a while to figure out the game that way. That's the impressive thing, that he learned how to handle that business that well, utilize the people around him and understand that he didn't have to go win the game."

While Prescott had plenty of help during his rookie season, it was pretty evident Wentz was lacking in that area. 

Prescott had a great offensive line, Dez Bryant, Ezekiel Elliott and others. Wentz had an offensive line that was missing Lane Johnson, an often-injured Ryan Mathews and receivers like Nelson Agholor and Dorial Green-Beckham playing serious snaps. 

So it made sense when the team went out this offseason and signed Alshon Jeffery, Torrey Smith, and recently LeGarrette Blount, as free agents, finally getting Wentz some real help. 

"We had opportunities to get those two guys and it was obvious last year, we were young at the wide receiver position," Peterson said. "We needed some leadership, some veteran presence there and we went out and got that with Torrey and Alshon. We still want to build through the draft, we still want to acquire young talent. 

"LeGarrette Blount now is a guy that gives us that big back, running back, that can come in and compete and hopefully he does everything he did at New England the last couple of seasons. He had 18 rushing touchdowns for over 1,000 yards and we just expect that same level of performance here."

Maybe having weapons will allow Wentz to do what made Prescott so impressive to Pederson in 2016: not too much. 

Tonight's lineup: Michael Saunders dropped to eighth in order

Tonight's lineup: Michael Saunders dropped to eighth in order

Pete Mackanin is still searching for answers to the Phillies' offensive woes following Sunday afternoon's disheartening 1-0 loss in Pittsburgh during which the Phils could only muster three hits.

The latest lineup twist as the search for an answer continues will see Michael Saunders bat in the eight-hole tonight as the Phils open a four-game series with the surging Rockies tonight at Citizens Bank Park (see game notes).

When he has started this season, Saunders has been a fixture within the middle of the Phillies' order. After all, the offseason free-agent signing was an All-Star for Toronto last season when he hit 24 homers and drove in 57 runs.

But this season hasn't gone as planned as Saunders is hitting just .232 with four homers and 15 RBI in 41 games with the Phils this season.

With Saunders' drop down the lineup, Tommy Joseph will bat fourth, Maikel Franco fifth and Odubel Herrera sixth against Rockies spot starter Jeff Hoffman.

Tonight's full lineups can be found below:

Phillies
1. Cesar Hernandez 2B
2. Freddy Galvis SS
3. Aaron Altherr LF
4. Tommy Joseph 1B
5. Maikel Franco 3B
6. Odubel Herrera CF
7. Cameron Rupp C
8. Michael Saunders RF
9. Jerad Eickhoff SP

Rockies
1. Charlie Blackmon CF
2. D.J. LeMehiau 2B
3. Nolan Arenado 3B
4. Carlos Gonzalez RF
5. Mark  Reynolds 1B
6. Gerardo Parra LF
7. Alexi Amarista SS
8. Tony Wolters C
9. Jeff Hoffman SP