Eagles Free Agency Preview: Class of 2011 a Cautionary Tale

Eagles Free Agency Preview: Class of 2011 a Cautionary Tale

One of the most common complaints levied against the Eagles
during the Donovan McNabb years was aimed at owner Jeffrey Lurie, who was often
accused of operating his franchise on the cheap. Folks watched as one prominent
veteran after another was cast aside rather than re-signed, all while the front
office would seldom target the sexiest names in free agency.

Perception wasn’t always reality in this case. We know now
that the fan favorites the team left walk away were typically on the verge of
being washed up, with few notable exceptions. And while the Eagles were usually
game to test the free agent waters, former president Joe Banner thought extending the club’s own
young talent a better use of Lurie’s checkbook.

With good reason it turns out. If anybody still questions
the organization’s guiding philosophy during that time period, look no
further than what happened with the free-agent class of 2011.

Due to a rare set of circumstances, the Birds were able to
treat free agency like they were on Supermarket Sweep. A number of players had
their unrestricted status delayed for a full year as a result of the lockout, causing
the market to become inundated with talent as soon as that drama was finally
sorted out. And the Eagles themselves were in prime position to make it rain,
having just purged their roster of most of its expensive veterans one offseason
prior.

Plenty of folks had already come to grow suspicious of the
harpy song that is free agency. Philadelphia endured Stacy Andrews, Darren
Howard, and Jevon Kearse as big-money signings over the past 10 years, along with
the likes of Dhani Jones and Kevin Curtis to a lesser extent.

It was practically impossible not to get excited about the
Eagles’ summer though, viewed almost universally as a major coup for Banner, Howie Roseman, and everybody involved. Depth on offense was supposed to be solidified by Pro
Bowlers Vince Young, Ronnie Brown, and Steve Smith. The defense should have been
overhauled by the additions of Cullen Jenkins, Jason Babin, and Nnamdi Asomugha.

They were a “Dream Team.”

Which is far from how everything worked out of course. The
only player from a class that numbered in the double digits and is a virtual lock to make the team a mere
two years later in 2013 is Evan Mathis. At the time, Mathis was not viewed
with much importance, nor even the most highly-regarded offensive lineman they
signed.

By and large, free agency is not an ideal solution. What type of
players manage to become unrestricted free agents without a contract extension
or getting slapped with the franchise tag in the first place? Besides the
broken, under-utilized, or plain ol’ bad: aging players, players who excelled
in a certain scheme, and very-good-to-elite players who a) also fit one of the first
two descriptions, or b) are asking for way too much money.

That’s not to say free agency can’t be a helpful tool in
team building. However, it’s often best when used to supplement the existing
talent, rather than as a key part of an organization’s infrastructure like it
became for the Birds.

Then again, according to EaglesCap.com the Eagles have an
estimated $33 million to play with this offseason. That figure will only
grow once the front office comes to a decision on Nnamdi Asomugha.

Looks like the team is back in prime position to go on
another spending spree should they so desire.

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NHL Playoffs: Penguins beat Senators in 2OT of Game 7 to reach Stanley Cup Final

NHL Playoffs: Penguins beat Senators in 2OT of Game 7 to reach Stanley Cup Final

BOX SCORE

PITTSBURGH -- The Pittsburgh Penguins are heading back to the Stanley Cup Final.

Chris Kunitz beat Craig Anderson 5:09 into the second overtime to give the defending champions a 3-2 victory over the Ottawa Senators in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference final Thursday night.

Kunitz scored twice, his first two of the playoffs. Justin Schultz added the other in his return from an upper-body injury, and Matt Murray stopped 28 shots on his 23rd birthday.

The Penguins are trying to become the first team since the Detroit Red Wings in 1998 to win back-to-back titles. They will host Western Conference champion Nashville in Game 1 on Monday night.

Mark Stone and Ryan Dzingel scored for Ottawa. The Senators rallied twice to tie it, with Dzingel making it 2-2 with 5:19 left in regulation.

Craig Anderson made 39 saves, but couldn't get a handle on Kunitz's shot from just outside the left circle. The Senators are 0-6 in Game 7s in franchise history.

The Senators forced a return trip to Pittsburgh -- where they lost 7-0 loss in Game 5 on Sunday -- by leaning heavily on Anderson in a 2-1 Game 6 victory, putting both teams at odds with history.

Ottawa came in 0-for-25 years in winner-take-all games, while the Penguins were 0-7 in Game 7s at home in series in which they also dropped Game 6.

Ottawa coach Guy Boucher told his resilient team to not get caught up in the big picture but instead focus on the small ones, a recipe that carried the Senators throughout a bumpy transition under their first-year head coach to the brink of the franchise's second Cup appearance.

The Penguins, trying to become the first defending champion to return to the finals since Detroit in 2009, came in confident they would advance if they could replicate their dominant Game 6, when they were undone only by Anderson's brilliance.

Pittsburgh has been nearly unflappable in the face of adversity under Mike Sullivan, going 12-2 in playoff games following a loss over the last two springs. He encouraged his team to "just play," code for fighting through Ottawa's neutral zone-clogging style and the bumping, grabbing and pulling that comes along with it.

A chance to play for their sport's ultimate prize on the line, the sheets of open ice the Penguins found so easily in Games 4-6 closed up. For most of the first 30 minutes, loose pucks hopped over sticks to spoil some scoring opportunities while Anderson and Murray gobbled up the rest.

Kunitz, relegated to the fourth line since returning from injury in the second round, picked up his first postseason goal in a calendar year when he completed a two-on-one with Conor Sheary -- a healthy scratch in Games 5 and 6 -- by slipping the puck by Anderson 9:55 into the second period.

The momentum lasted all of 20 seconds. Ottawa responded immediately with Stone -- who stretched his left skate to stay onside -- fired a wrist shot that handcuffed Murray.

Pittsburgh kept coming. Schultz, returning after missing four games with an upper-body injury, zipped a shot from the point through Kunitz's screen and into the net with 8:16 left in the third.

Once again, the Penguins could not hold the lead. Dzingel set up at the right post and banged home a rebound off Erik Karlsson's shot that hit the left post and caromed off Murray's back right to Dzingel's stick.

Notes
The home team is 21-20 in overtime Game 7s in NHL playoff history. ... Pittsburgh F Patric Hornqvist skated during warmups, but was held out of the lineup for a sixth straight game with an upper-body injury. ... Karlsson had 16 assists in the playoffs to set a team record. ... The Penguins are 10-7 in Game 7s. ... It was the fifth one-goal game of the series.

Howie Kendrick hit by pitch twice, removed from rehab start at Triple A

Howie Kendrick hit by pitch twice, removed from rehab start at Triple A

Howie Kendrick experienced a painful rehab start on Thursday night.

Rehabbing with Triple A Lehigh Valley, Kendrick was hit by a pitch twice before being removed after the sixth inning of the IronPigs' 8-4 loss to Indianapolis at Coca-Cola Park.

Both times Kendrick was plunked in the upper left arm, according to Tom Housenick of the Morning Call.

There was no update on if Kendrick was injured or taken out for precautionary reasons. Thursday marked Kendrick's second rehab start as he recovers from an oblique strain that has sidelined him since April 15.

The Phillies' leftfielder started at third base Thursday. At the beginning of his rehab assignment, Kendrick was expected to play four games and see time at third and first base, as well as in left field.

Kendrick made a throwing error at third on Thursday and finished 0 for 1 with a run scored. In his two games, he's 0 for 3 with two strikeouts.

Kendrick hit .333 with four doubles, a triple and five RBIs in 10 games with the Phillies prior to landing on the DL.

When he returns, he could see time at third base instead of left field if Maikel Franco continues to struggle (see story).